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The Yearbook of International Organizations provides the most extensive coverage of non-profit international organizations currently available. Detailed profiles of international non-governmental and intergovernmental organizations (IGO), collected and documented by the Union of International Associations, can be found here. In addition to the history, aims and acitvities of international organizations, with their events, publications and contact details, the volumes of the Yearbook include networks between associations, biographies of key people involved and extensive statistical data.

Volume 2 allows users to locate organizations by the country in which secretariats or members are located.
The Center for Oceans Law and Policy series examines the most important aspects of oceans law and policy and is published under the auspices of the Center for Oceans Law and Policy at the University of Virginia. Supporting research, education, and discussion on legal and public policy issues relating to the oceans, the Center is among the leading institutes in the field and promotes interdisciplinary interaction at all levels, addressing international, national, regional, and state issues.
Illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing is a widely used designation for a broad range of fishing practices with a common theme: whether illegal or not, they cause damage to marine fish stocks and the human communities that depend on them. Yet, when subjected to thorough analysis, this pragmatic governance tool is revealed in a light that calls for caution against uncritical application. Unwrapping its uneasy relationship with international law, this study is ultimately a qualified defence of the IUU fishing paradigm, but also a practical proposal for its reform. This original book makes a genuine contribution to the international fisheries law and policy literature.
The Austrian Review of International and European Law is an annual publication that provides a scholarly forum for the discussion of issues of international and European law, with emphasis on topics of special interest for Austria. Each volume of the Review includes general articles, current developments, and the comprehensive annual digest of Austrian practice in international law, encompassing judicial decisions, executive as well as parliamentary documents relating to international law. The concluding parts of the Review contain longer book reviews and shorter book notes. Volume 24 covers 2019 and features contributions from the conference ’50 Years Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties (VCLT)’
Editor: Jan Melissen
Diplomatic Studies (DIST) is a peer-reviewed book series that encourages original work on the theory and practice, processes and outcomes of diplomacy. It aims to advance the understanding of the importance of diplomacy to international relations. The broad scope of the series reflects the interdisciplinary and inclusive nature of diplomatic studies.

Diplomatic Studies welcomes monographs and edited volumes, including contemporary, historical and future-oriented academic work. The series is receptive to a wide array of methodologies. Books in the series cover a variety of forms of diplomatic practice. We particularly welcome excellent academic work that is breaking new empirical ground or that is theoretically or methodologically innovative. Manuscripts should, however, meet a minimum length requirement of 80,000 words.

The book series is edited by The Hague Journal of Diplomacy’s co-Editor-in-Chief, Jan Melissen. In line with the journal, Diplomatic Studies publishes research that meets the highest standards of excellence on the theory, practice, and techniques of diplomacy.

Visit also our journal The Hague Journal of Diplomacy.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Debbie de Wit.
The Impact of Article 6 of the European Convention on Human Rights
Author: Cristina Teleki
In Due Process and Fair Trial in EU Competition Law, Cristina Teleki addresses the complex relationship between Articles 101 and 102 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union and Article 6 of the European Convention on Human Rights.
The book is built around the idea that big business can threaten democracy. Due process and fair trial should be central to the process of addressing bigness through competition law, by safeguarding independent decision-making and judicial review and by preventing competition authorities from growing into administrative behemoths threatening democracy from inside. To show this, the book combines a comprehensive review of the case-law of the European Court of Human Rights with insight from economics, psychology and systems theory.
Author: Huw Llewellyn
Huw Llewellyn offers a comparative institutional analysis of the five United Nations criminal tribunals (for the former Yugoslavia, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Cambodia and Lebanon), assessing the strengths and weaknesses of their institutional forms in supporting the governance, independence and impartiality of these pioneering criminal justice bodies.

Largely overlooked in the otherwise comprehensive literature on international criminal justice, this book focuses on “parenthood”, “oversight” and “ownership” by the tribunals’ governing bodies, concepts unnecessary in national jurisdictions, and traces the tension between governance and judicial independence through the different phases of the tribunals’ lifecycles: from their establishment to commencement of operations, completion of mandates and closure, and finally to the “afterlife” of their residual phase.
Author: Robert Böttner
Enhanced Cooperation allows a group of Member States to use the EU’s competences and institutions to pursue a project within the Union’s framework that is binding only on the participating States while remaining an EU act. Introduced by the Amsterdam Treaty, this tool of flexible integration was not used until 2010. In The Constitutional Framework for Enhanced Cooperation in EU Law, Robert Böttner analyses the primary-law framework of this flexibility tool. On the basis of profound literature review and against the background of recent Member State practice, the author redefines the constitutional rules of Enhanced Cooperation. He draws conclusions on this tool’s legal limits, but also its potential for European integration.
Author: Carolyn M Evans
Reform discourse about the United Nations Security Council gives every reason to believe that flaws in its legal and institutional design prevent the Council from adequately meeting its responsibility to maintain or restore international peace and security - in part by allowing the Council to act in an ad hoc and unprincipled manner. In Towards a more accountable United Nations Security Council, Carolyn Evans argues that enhanced accountability of the Council, and corresponding evolution of practice, are feasible, salutary changes towards the Council better answering its raison d'être. Discussion proceeds by probing the why, to whom, for what, and how, of Council accountability - four corners of concerns central to seeing any actor held accountable.