Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 151 items for :

  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Just Published x
Clear All
The Image of a Ruler in the Latin Text of The Chronicle of the Priest of Duklja
The Chronicle of the Priest of Duklja is considered to be among the most important and mysterious narrative sources discussing the Slavic presence on the Adriatic coast and its hinterland. It is also one of the most controversial. This detailed study examines the Latin version of the chronicle, and it explores the deeper meanings hidden behind the history of the contrived monarchy, acknowledging the tradition regarding the fate of its leading rulers. The work focuses on four representatives of the royal family, rulers during key periods in the narrative. Each of the kings presented a different pattern of rule, and each of them, in his own way, established new rules for the functioning of the Kingdom of the Slavs.
In this volume, seventeen scholars from Estonia, Hungary, Lithuania, Poland, and Slovakia present their research on the formation and transformation of national literary canons as a practice of nation-building in Central Europe and the Baltics.The articles focus on the shaping of national identities through literature and analyze the establishment of literary canons by means of language, the role of national poets, and similar topics. Case studies of so-called minor literatures reveal common tendencies in the structure of many national canons, as well as specific responses and creative decisions in nation-building processes. This volume rethinks the relations between literature and nationalism (from the 19th century to present times) and contributes to the field of studies of historical development of nationalism.

Contributors are: Olga Bartosiewicz-Nikolaev, Renata Beličová, Ramunė Bleizgienė, Paweł Bukowiec, Anna R. Burzyńska, Judit Dobry, Gergely Fórizs, Katre Kikas, Aistė Kučinskienė, Helena Markowska-Fulara, Radosław Okulicz-Kozaryn, Jurga Sadauskienė, Vaidas Šeferis, Viktorija Šeina, Brigita Speičytė, Jagoda Wierzejska, and Krystyna Zabawa.
In Images of China in Polish and Serbian Travel Writings (1720-1949), Tomasz Ewertowski examines how Polish and Serbian travelers described China, surveys various factors which influenced their style of writing, and illustrates the social, political and intellectual context that determined their different representations of the Middle Kingdom. The corpus includes a vast array of texts written by more than 80 authors who traveled to China from the 18th to the mid-20th century, including sources that have not been published. Besides making new facts and sources accessible, the research presented in this book introduces a comparative perspective and provides a thorough literary and cultural analysis of the aforesaid travelogues.
Russian Philosophy in the Twenty-First Century: An Anthology provides the English-speaking world with access to post-Soviet philosophic thought in Russia for the first time. The Anthology presents the fundamental range of contemporary philosophical problems in the works of prominent Russian thinkers. In contrast to the “single-mindedness” of Soviet-era philosophers and the bias toward Orthodox Christianity of émigré philosophers, it offers to its readers the authors’ plurality of different positions in widely diverse texts. Here one finds strictly academic philosophical works and those in an applied, pragmatic format—secular and religious—that are dedicated to complex social and political matters, to pressing cultural topics or insights into international terrorism, as well as to contemporary science and global challenges.
In Sources of Slavic Pre-Christian Religion Juan Antonio Álvarez-Pedrosa presents the original texts as well as English translations of all known medieval sources that inform us about the religion practiced by the Slavs before their Christianization. Since the Slavs did not have a written culture before their conversion to Christianity, all the texts were authored by people who were involved in this long process or in contact with the Slavs. For this reason, the texts come from a lengthy period from the ninth to the fifteenth century. Since the texts were originally written in seven different ancient languages, the present book is the result of the work of a large team of specialists.
Figurationen des Synergos in der slavischen Moderne
Author: Tatjana Petzer
Synergismus, das Zusammenwirken des Menschen mit Gott und Natur, ist ein wesentlicher Schlüssel zur Anthropotechnik und Transformationsästhetik der Slavia orthodoxa.
Visionen des modernen Synergos verbinden christliche und säkulare Umgestaltungsprojekte, die sich angesichts neuer wissenschaftlich-technischer Möglichkeiten ihren Weg bahnten, und trennen sie zugleich. Der Synergiediskurs geht keineswegs nahtlos in zeitgenössischen Sozialutopien und den Entwürfen des neuen Menschen der sowjetischen Biopolitik auf. Vor dem Hintergrund der epistemischen Umbrüche und Synthesen um 1900, die das Verhältnis von Wissen und Glauben neu justierten, untersucht das Buch synergetische Modellbildungen insbesondere in der russischen Philosophie, Wissenschaft, Literatur und Kunst als ein Fundament der modernen slavischen Wissenskultur.
In “The Turk” in the Czech Imagination (1870s-1923), Jitka Malečková describes Czechs’ views of the Turks in the last half century of the existence of the Ottoman Empire and how they were influenced by ideas and trends in other countries, including the European fascination with the Orient, images of “the Turk,” contemporary scholarship, and racial theories. The Czechs were not free from colonial ambitions either, as their attitude to Bosnia-Herzegovina demonstrates, but their viewpoint was different from that found in imperial states and among the peoples who had experienced Ottoman rule. The book convincingly shows that the Czechs mainly viewed the Turks through the lenses of nationalism and Pan-Slavism – in solidarity with the Slavs fighting against Ottoman rule.
Author: Grzegorz Moroz
A Generic History of Travel Writing in Anglophone and Polish Literature offers a comprehensive, comparative and generic analysis of developments of travel writing in Anglophone and Polish literature from the Late Medieval Period to the twenty-first century. These developments are depicted in a wider context of travel narratives written in other European languages. Grzegorz Moroz convincingly argues that, for all the similarities and cross-cultural influences, in the course of the nineteenth and twentieth century non-fiction Anglophone and Polish travel writing have dynamically evolved different generic horizons of expectations. While the Anglophone travel book developed relatively steadily in that period, the Polish genre of the podróż was first replaced by the listy (kartki) z podróży, and then by the reportaż podróżniczy.
In her book, Gulnaz Sibgatullina examines the intricate relationship of religion, identity and language-related beliefs against the background of socio-political changes in post-Soviet Russia. Focusing on the Russian and Tatar languages, she explores how they simultaneously serve the needs of both Muslims and Christians living in the country today.

Mapping linguistic strategies of missionaries, converts and religious authorities, Sibgatullina demonstrates how sacred vocabulary in each of the languages is being contested by a variety of social actors, often with competing agendas. These linguistic collisions not only affect meanings of the religious lexicon in Tatar and Russian but also drive a gradual convergence of Russia's Islam and Christianity.
In this volume, Stanisław Rosik focuses on the meaning and significance of Old Slavic religion as presented in three German chronicles (the works of Thietmar of Merseburg, Adam of Bremen, Helmold of Bosau) written during the time of the Christianization of the Western Slavs. The source analyses show the ways the chroniclers understood, explained and represented pre-Christian beliefs and cults, which were interpreted as elements of a foreign, “barbarian”, culture and were evaluated from the perspective of Church doctrine. In this study, individual features of the three authors are discussed– including the issue of the credibility of their information on Old Slavic religion– and broader conclusions on medieval thought are also presented.