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Volume Editors: Nian Cai Liu, Yan Wu, and Qi Wang
The Eighth International Conference on World-Class Universities was held in October 2019. The conference theme was “World-Class Universities: Global Trends and Institutional Models”.

The theme of this volume is embedded in the context of an ever-changing and complex world. Changes are taking place constantly in social, economic, cultural and political spheres, such as technological transformation, backlash against globalization and emerging forces of nationalism in various parts of the world, as well as increasing inequality and disparity of wealth, economic and social opportunities. These challenges impact global, national and institutional higher education practices and induce mounting pressure on World-Class Universities to respond effectively to the ferocity of social change.

World-Class Universities, commonly recognized as global research universities or flagship universities, are essential in developing a nation’s potential in the knowledge economy and in seeking conceptual and practical solutions to daunting challenges. This volume sheds light on World-Class Universities’ challenges, opportunities, roles and strategies in response to the changing landscape of higher education and our society as a whole. It is composed of two parts: “Global Trends” and “Institutional Models”.
This volume is already the 50th in the book series Global Perspectives on Higher Education! In this book, the editors and authors paid special attention to this important anniversary.

The 50th volume in the book series ‘Global Perspectives on Higher Education' offers a stimulating and thoughtful assessment of higher education from a global perspective which addresses the challenges and prospects for the next decade. The challenges now faced by higher education and its likely future prospects and patterns are examined in terms of policy papers and case studies. Five broad topics are considered: the situation of academic faculty, the demand for access, the role of the university in society and its governance, funding trends, and higher education’s international dimensions.

The volume brings together as authors fourteen of the thirty participants of the Fulbright New Century Scholars 2005/2006 program, whose research addressed the topic of Higher Education in the 21st Century: Global Challenge and National Response and was published in a volume edited by the program leaders, Philip G. Altbach and Patti McGill Peterson, Higher Education in the New Century: Global Challenges and Innovative Ideas (2007). The present book not only continues the examination and assessment of current global trends in higher education, but also bears witness to the enduring power of Senator Fulbright’s vision of furthering mutual international understanding and offering collaborative study opportunities which extend the frontiers of knowledge.
Volume Editors: Maria N. Gravani and Bonnie Slade
Learner-Centred Education for Adult Migrants in Europe: A Critical Comparative Analysis contributes to the field of Adult Education by investigating the ways in which Learner-Centred Education (LCE) is being enacted, implemented or neglected in specific settings.

The book addresses the lack of research on how LCE is used in adult education as a tool for social change across different national contexts. This comparative approach is crucial for exploring the complex global, regional, national and local dynamics that account for varying implementations (or non-implementations) of LCE in different settings, for appreciating the thin or wide differences in practices of implementation, and for assessing the successes, failures and needs for improvement of diverse LCE programmes. The book’s primary focus on migration as a social process, and migrants as active citizens is useful in unravelling the convergences and divergences of different national and urban settings where migrant adult learners live as citizens, or as non-citizens, and how this intersects with their experiences as learners.

This research is contextualised in a larger political context. What emerges from the parting reflection is a European scenario marked by ambivalent and contradictory relations with migrants, and an educational intervention that is located somewhere between the assimilationist-integrationist dialectic. The four cases presented (Estonia, Malta, Scotland and Cyprus) generally respond to the learners’ needs on the ground while rarely problematising the ideological stance of the state in relation to the educational plight of migrants. The final chapter introduces and elaborates on a new concept, Emancipatory LCE, to help generate a deeper analysis.
Volume Editors: Denise Mifsud and Paolo Landri
This edited volume focuses on the cultural situatedness of educational leadership in countries in the Mediterranean basin (Malta, Israel, Spain, Algeria, Portugal, Italy, Cyprus) featuring chapters that explore the reception of the leadership concept and its enactment in education settings within one or more countries of the Mediterranean; consider how both local and global policy discourses work on education leaders who translate this in a distinct school context; focus on the interplay of leaders, followers and context as a complex and ambiguous social construction within the Mediterranean context; study leadership via a combination of a theoretical definition and a consideration of what a particular group means by ‘leadership’, with a specific openness to local meanings; explore the unfolding of education reform as either a top-down or bottom-up process; consider the various cultural, religious, social and local factors that ‘dictate’ both leadership enactment, in addition to the power flow among leaders and followers; argue how the territorial, political and religious conflicts affect educational leadership, and thus the implementation of education reform to either conform to or converge from globalized discourses.

This book is targeted for post-graduate and doctoral students, as well as scholars, interested in the study of educational leadership, policy and politics of education, Mediterranean studies, and sociology of education. It is also of interest to those who feel the need to address the ‘missing-what’ of educational leadership in the Mediterranean region, an area of study that is largely dominated by Western models.
This volume addresses a gap in previous research and explores Nordic textbooks chronologically and empirically from the Protestant Reformation to our present time. The chapters are written by scholars from universities in Finland, Denmark, Sweden and Norway, countries that distinguish themselves with a rich tradition of textbook research. The authors represent different academic traditions and use a wide range of scholarly methods and perspectives. The overall objective is to highlight how textbooks reflect national cultural politics and legislation. The various chapters cast light on how textbooks are integrated in national politics and demonstrate how they have contributed to nation-building and to strengthening the nations’ core values and other major political projects.

Contributors are: Karl Christian Alvestad, Norunn Askeland, Kjell Lars Berge, Peter Bernhardsson, Kerstin Bornholdt, Mads B. Claudi, Henrik Edgren, Morten Fink-Jensen, Stig Toke Gissel, Thomas Illum Hansen, Pirjo Hiidenmaa, Marthe Hommerstad, Axel Hörstedt, Kari-Anne Jørgensen-Vittersø, Tujia Laine, Esbjörn Larsson, Ragnhild Elisabeth Lund, Christina Matthiesen, Eva Maagerø, Tuva Skjelbred Nodeland, Kari H. Nordberg, Merethe Roos, Henriette Hogga Siljan, Johan Laurits Tønnesson and Janne Varjo.
Policy and Practice in Multilingual Education Based on Non-Dominant Languages
This second volume of Language Issues in Comparative Education, following the tradition of the first, introduces the state of the field, re-establishes core terminology and concepts, and situates the chapters in terms of their contributions to multilingual education based on non-dominant languages. The first group of chapters examines language-in-education policy change, applying an innovative framework to analyze diverse contexts including Mozambique, Estonia and the Philippines. The next group of chapters describes activities designed to implement multilingual education. Using examples from Chad, Ethiopia, Kenya and Nepal, they explore progress in teacher professional development and elaboration of materials for literacy and learning through non-dominant languages. Some highlight new areas of the field, attending to speakers of non-dominant languages other than the ones chosen for instruction, and to the urgent multilingual needs of refugee learners. The final group of chapters presents strategies for research and advocacy, illustrated with examples from DR Congo, Uganda and India. Taken together, these contributions form a cohesive body of work that takes stock of advances in multilingual education and moves the field forward.

The authors and editors share a common commitment to comparativism in their methods and analysis, and aim to contribute to a more inclusive and multilingual education for all.

See inside the book.
This diverse and global collection of scholars, educators, and activists presents a panorama of perspectives on media education and democracy in a digital age. Drawing upon projects in both the formal and non-formal education spheres, the authors contribute towards conceptualizing, developing, cultivating, building and elaborating a more respectful, robust and critically-engaged democracy. Given the challenges our world faces, it may seem that small projects, programs and initiatives offer just a salve to broader social and political dynamics but these are the types of contestatory spaces, openings and initiatives that enable participatory democracy. This book provides a space for experimentation and dialogue, and a platform for projects and initiatives that challenge or supplement the learning offered by traditional forms of education. The Foreword is written by Divina Frau-Meigs (Sorbonne Nouvelle, Paris) and the Postscript by Roberto Apirici and David García Marín (UNED, Madrid).

Contributors are: Roberto Aparici, Adelina Calvo Salvador, Paul R. Carr, Colin Chasi, Sandra L. Cuervo Sanchez, Laura D’Olimpio, Milena Droumeva, Elia Fernández-Diaz, Ellen Field, Michael Forsman, Divina Frau-Meigs, Aquilina Fueyo Gutiérrez, David García-Marín, Tania Goitandia Moore, José Gutiérrez-Pérez, Ignacio Haya Salmón, Bruno Salvador Hernández Levi, Michael Hoechsmann, Jennifer Jenson, Maria Korpijaakko, Sirkku Kotilainen, Emil Marmol, María Dolores Olvera-Lobo, Tania Ouariachi, Mari Pienimäki, Anna Renfors, Ylva Rodney-Gumede, Carlos Rodríguez-Hoyos, Mar Rodríguez-Romero, Tafadzwa Rugoho, Juha Suoranta, Gina Thésée, Robyn M. Tierney, Robert C. Williams and María Luisa Zorrilla Abascal.
International cooperation in higher education is not new, but gained new urgency in recent years with the expansion of the knowledge economy, the easy flow of communications and the emulation created by international rankings. In the European Union’s countries, international competition and the process of political and economic unification required national higher education institutions to give priority to international cooperation, while large countries such as Russia, China, Brazil and South Africa intensified their effort to modernise their institutions and link them to the international flow of science, technology and talent, leading similar trends in other countries in their regions. These global trends are shaped by the national culture and institutions of each country, and the existing national and international cooperation policies and instruments on all sides. In Building Higher Education Cooperation with the EU: Challenges and Opportunities from Four Continents, the authors look at how these interactions occur from the perspectives of the European Union and the countries involved and make recommendations on policies that could make international cooperation more fluid and beneficial to all parties involved.
Volume Editors: Denise Bentrovato and Johan Wassermann
Emerging from the pioneering work of the African Association for History Education (AHE-Afrika), Teaching African History in Schools offers an original Africa-centred contribution to international history education research. Edited by AHE-Afrika’s founders and directors, the volume thus addresses a notable gap in this field by showcasing otherwise marginalised scholarship from and about Africa.

Teaching African History in Schools constitutes a unique collection of nine empirical studies, interrogating curriculum and textbook contents, and teachers’ and learners’ voices and experiences as they relate to teaching and learning African history across the continent and beyond. Case studies include South Africa, Kenya, Rwanda, Zimbabwe, Malawi, Cameroon and Tanzania, as well as the UK and Canada.

Contributors are: Denise Bentrovato, Carol Bertram, Jean-Leonard Buhigiro, Annie Fatsereni Chiponda, Raymond Nkwenti Fru, Marshall Tamuka Maposa, Abdul Mohamud, Sabrina Moisan, Reville Nussey, Nancy Rushohora, Johan Wassermann, and Robin Whitburn.
The rapid social, economic and technological changes taking place in the world today have led to the rise of social and emotional learning (SEL) as an essential requirement in positive human development and meaningful education. SEL competencies such as self-awareness, emotional regulation, problem solving, collaboration, understanding and empathising with others, embracing diversity and conflict resolution, are key 21st century competences.

The turbulences taking place in the Mediterranean region such as civil strife, violence, socio-economic hardship, forced displacement, human trafficking and child abuse, have directed academics’, policy makers' and practitioners’ interest towards SEL. SEL became an innovative avenue in preventing and addressing some of the main challenges being faced by countries in the Mediterranean basin in the healthy development and quality education of children and young people.

Social and Emotional Learning in the Mediterranean: Cross Cultural Perspectives and Approaches is the first publication of this kind to explore how the Mediterranean region is seeking to address the issues and challenges in the promotion and implementation of SEL. It is an attempt to raise awareness on the SEL policies, frameworks and practices taking place in the Mediterranean region, to share and celebrate good practices, and to critically reflect on the challenges faced in the effective implementation of SEL in the region, with recommendations for policy, interventions and research.