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Connecting Theory and Practice (4th Edition)
Authors: Wendy Patton and Mary McMahon
This fourth edition of the book represents a milestone in the history of the Systems Theory Framework that attests to its continuing influence and contemporary relevance. It emphasises changes in career development theory, practice, and research since its first edition in 1999. At that time, the publication of the STF was described by reviewers as a “groundbreaking departure from traditional counseling texts”, a “landmark work leading to the convergence of career development theories”, and as a “rare book that not only illuminates a field of study but also advances it”. Subsequent commentary attests to the strength of the metatheoretical contribution of the STF and its facilitation of links between theory, research, and practice. This book introduces systems theory and the STF, and comprehensively overviews traditional and contemporary career theory and analyses it through the metatheoretical lens of the STF. It then describes applications of the STF by applying systems thinking, systems mapping and experiential learning. Finally, the contributions and future directions of the STF are highlighted. This book provides a record of almost 30 years of contribution of the STF to the career theory, research, and practice field.
Volume Editor: JuliAnna Ávila
How would you implement Critical Digital Literacies in your own classrooms and educational programs?

You will find a valuable resource to answer that question in this volume, with a pronounced focus on social justice. Seventeen contributors advance the theories and praxis of Critical Digital Literacies. Aimed at literacy, teacher education, and English Education practitioners, this volume explores critical practices with digital tools. The chapters highlight activities and approaches which cross the boundaries of: genre; critical data literacy; materiality; critical self-reflection; preservice teacher education; gender; young adult literature; multimodal composition; assessment; gaming; podcasting; and second-language teacher education. Authors also explore the challenges of carrying out both the critical and the digital within the context and confines of traditional schooling.

Contributors are: Claire Ahn, JuliAnna Ávila, Alexander Bacalja, Lourdes Cardozo-Gaibisso, Edison Castrillón Angel, Elena Galdeano, Matthew Hall, Amber Jensen, Elisabeth Johnson, Raúl Alberto Mora, Luci Pangrazio, Ernesto Peña, Amy Piotrowski, Amanda Miller Plaizier, Holger Pötzsch, Mary Rice and Anna Smith.
A Critical Review for Educators, Librarians, Families, Researchers & Writers
This enriched reference guide offers a unique overview of more than 200 picture books published by Canadian publishing houses between 2017–2019. The authors cover key themes in contemporary Canadian titles that match broad curriculum trends in education. Response activities are included in the text, for example frameworks for critical literacy discussions, along with annotated bibliographies that specifically recognize titles by Indigenous authors and illustrators. The book also contains original interviews with a dozen rising stars in Canadian writing and book illustration. While the book is specifically geared for educators, it also supports public libraries, Education researchers, and future picture book creators, as well as families who are interested in learning more about reading development and related literacy activities for the home setting.
Engaging People, Place and Context with Big hART
Authors: Peter Wright and Barry Down
This book provides a unique insiders account of the work of Big hART, one of Australia’s leading participatory arts organisations. Founded on the values of social justice, creativity and transformation Big hART seeks to mobilise a range of community resources including young people, elders, artists, and community activists to produce high quality public performances of merit and social worth. Located in diverse geographic, social and cultural settings across Australia’s vast landscape, these creative works generate intergenerational understandings of the cultural processes of individual and collective transformation strengthening capabilities, identity, and connected belonging. This book documents a series of powerful stories that illuminate the ideological, artistic and cultural pathways and learnings gifted by the generosity of participants themselves.
This selected translation of Blue Book of Chinese Education 2016 reviews China’s education development in 2015. Chapter one offers an overview. Chapters two to four examine rural education in China, including the education of the left-behind children, compulsory education in rural areas, and the working condition of rural teachers. Chapters five to eleven cover educational services, education reform, non-governmental education, training program for teachers, teaching of traditional Chinese culture, the basic values of high-school students, and school bullying. The last three chapters are survey reports of compulsory education development in Chinese cities, math and science education for ethnic minority populations, and education authorities’ attitudes toward reform. The seven appendices provide important supplementary materials.
We live in a time of unprecedented media use, much of which can be accessed by devices that fit in our pockets. Young people, in particular, make use of media on a near-constant basis. How can this media use be better understood?

This text focuses on the scholarship and research of David Buckingham, a global leader in media literacy education and children’s and young people’s media cultures. It is not an exaggeration to state that studies and applications of media literacy education around the globe are indebted to the scholarship of Buckingham and that more nuanced understandings of how children and young people make sense of their media choices are due, in large part, to Buckingham’s work.

Key Scholarship in Media Literacy: David Buckingham focuses on the key contributions of Buckingham’s work over his prolific career, illuminating the advances he made in the field of media literacy education and understandings of young people’s media cultures. Through a close look at Buckingham’s theoretical advancements, contributions to the larger field of media literacy education, and the key strains of his research – how children and young people learn, what they already know about media and pop culture before they enter classrooms, end media content about and for youth – this text delineates Buckingham’s vast bibliography and will be an invaluable resource for anyone curious to know more about children, youth, and media literacy education.

Analysis of Buckingham’s work is drawn from his robust bibliography, exploration of scholarship he has critiqued, interpretation of contemporary social concerns through the lens of his research, and formal and informal conversations with him over the course of several years.
Based on a multi-year ethnography in one Spanish-speaking community in New Jersey, this book is a meticulous account of six Mexican families that explores the relationship between siblings’ language use patterns, practices, and ideologies. Combining insights gained from language socialization and heritage language studies within the larger field of sociolinguistics, the book’s findings examine siblings’ sociolinguistic environments and the ways in which these Latino children use and view their multilingual resources in the home, school, and broader community. This study emphasizes the links between siblings’ language ideologies, agentive decision making, and linguistic patterns, and the ways in which birth order influences the different dimensions of heritage language maintenance in the U.S..
A Review of Educational Research
Preparing Indonesian Youth: A Review of Educational Research offers insights into the challenges and prospects in preparing Indonesian youth for 21st century living. The chapters feature empirically-based case studies focusing on three key aspects of education in Indonesia: teachers and teaching; school practices, programs, and innovations; and the social contexts of youth and schooling.

The case studies also represent different vantage points contributing to an enriched understanding of how larger social phenomenon—for example, education decentralisation in Indonesia, (rural-urban and transnational) migration, international benchmarking assessments, and the global feminist and women’s movement—impact and interact with enacted visions of preparing all youth educationally for work, as well as for meaningful participation in their respective communities and the Indonesian society at large.

Contributors are: Anindito Aditomo, Hasriadi Masalam, Juliana Murniati, Ahmad Bukhori Muslim, Wahyu Nurhayati, Shuki Osman, Margaretha Purwanti, Esti Rahayu, Ila Rosmilawati, Andrew Rosser, Widjajanti M. Santoso, Anne Suryani, Aries Sutantoputra, Novita W. Sutantoputri, Isabella Tirtowalujo, Nina Widyawati and David Wright.    
Advance Student-Scientist Partnerships beyond the Status Quo
Author: Pei-Ling Hsu
Working with scientists has been suggested as a powerful activity that can stimulate students’ interest and career aspirations in science. However, how to address challenges of power-over issues and communication barriers in youth-scientist partnerships? In Youths’ Cogenerative Dialogues with Scientists, the author describes a pioneering study to improve internship communications between youth and scientists through cogenerative dialogues. The findings show that cogenerative dialogues can help youth and scientists recognize, express, and manage their challenges and emotions as they arise in their internships. As a result, cogenerative dialogues help youth and scientists work productively as a team and enhance their social boding. Suggestions are also provided for science educators to design more innovative and effective projects for future youth-scientist partnerships.
Child-Parent Research Reimagined challenges the field to explore the meaning making experiences and the methodological and ethical challenges that come to the fore when researchers engage in research with their child, grandchild, or other relative. As scholars in and beyond the field of education grapple with ways that youth make meaning with digital and nondigital resources and practices, this edited volume offers insights into nuanced learning that is highly contextualized and textured while also (re)initiating important methodological and epistemological conversations about research that seeks to flatten traditional hierarchies, honor youth voices, and co-investigate facets of youth meaning making.

Contributors are (in alphabetical order): Charlotte Abrams, Sandra Schamroth Abrams, Kathleen M. Alley, Bill Cope, Mary Kalantzis, Molly Kurpis, Linda Laidlaw, Guy Merchant, Daniel Ness, Eric Ness, "E." O’Keefe, Joanne O’Mara, Anthony J. Onwuegbuzie, Sarah Prestridge, Lourdes M. Rivera, Dahlia Rivera-Larkin, Nora Rivera-Larkin, Alaina Roach O’Keefe, Mary Beth Schaefer, Cassandra R. Skrobot, and Bogum Yoon.