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Global Capitalism in Post-millennial North American Fiction
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If it is indeed impossible to think beyond capitalism, then capital has become reality. If global capitalism organizes reality through the stories it weaves, capital is (as strong as) its fictions. If capital is reality and capital is fiction, then reality as such is fiction as well. It is by reading this fiction for both patterns and inconsistencies that contemporary individuals can challenge global capital and unveil its hypocrisies; and it is by fighting fiction with fiction, i.e. projecting new realities – such as those in the post-millennial novels by William Gibson, Douglas Coupland, and Dave Eggers – that people can imagine the world anew.
The Plurality of Historical Worlds from Epicurus to Modern Science
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By digging through the stratigraphy of the history of ideas we can find within and beyond Marxism an ‘aleatory current’ that values the role of chance in history. Using this perspective, the book builds a case for a historical materialism that is stripped of all teleology. Starting in the ancient Mediterranean with Epicurus, it traces the history of conceiving history as plural up to Marxism and modern science. It shows that concrete historical ‘worlds’ such as ancient Mesoamerica and Eurasia cannot be reduced to a single template. Affirming the potentiality of a future non-capitalist ‘world’, it invalidates any ‘end of history’ thesis.
Featuring new archival research and previously unpublished photographs and architectural plans, this volume fundamentally revises our understanding of the development of modern New York, focusing on elite domestic architecture within the contexts of social history, urban planning, architecture, interior design, and adaptive re-use. Contributions from emerging and established scholars, art historians, and practitioners offer a multi-faceted analysis of major figures such as Horace Trumbauer, Julian Francis Abele, Robert Venturi, and Richard Kelly. Taking the James B. Duke House, now home to NYU’s Institute of Fine Arts, as its point of departure, this collection provides fresh perspectives on domestic spaces, urban forms, and social reforms that shaped early-twentieth century New York into the modern city we know today.
Religion and Power in the Jesuit Missions of Spanish Amazonia
Established in 1638 in a vast Amazonian territory that today encompasses border areas of Ecuador, Peru, Colombia, and Brazil, the missions of Maynas were one of the Society of Jesus’s main enterprises in Spanish America. Jesuit writings provide a unique insight into the seventeenth- and eighteenth-century encounters between Europeans and indigenous peoples. In effect, they shed light on how native Amazonians appropriated elements of Christian religiosity and Iberian urban culture. This book is not only about how indigenous populations experienced life in missions. It is above all a study of how natives actively engaged with the practices and ideas of settlement and religiosity that the Jesuits transmitted.
Historical Trajectories, Indigenous Cultures, Scholastic Thought, and Reception in History
The Transatlantic Las Casas demonstrates the vitality of Lascasian studies. An impressive ensemble of scholars spanning the fields of Latin American studies, philosophy, theology, anthropology, law, literary criticism, and ethnohistory illuminate the complex intellectual web surrounding this controversial figure.
This volume offers sophisticated explorations of colonial Latin American and early modern Iberian studies in a single volume from Laura Ammon; Thomas Eggensperger, O.P.; Natsuko Matsumori; Timothy A. McCallister; Luis Mora Rodríguez; David Thomas Orique, O.P.; María Cristina Ríos Espinosa; Rady Roldán-Figueroa; Mario Ruíz Sotelo; Frauke Sachse; Rubén A. Sánchez-Godoy; John F. Schwaller; Garry Sparks; Vanina M. Teglia; Dwight E.R. TenHuisen; Paola Uparela; Ramón Darío Valdivia Giménez; Andrew L. Wilson, and Victor Zorrilla.
This book, the first of its kind, is dedicated to different Spanish varieties spoken in the Amazonian regions of Peru, Ecuador, and Colombia. The contributions present diverse perspectives on theoretical, methodological, and descriptive characterizations of the study of Amazonian Spanish. It includes linguistic (phonological, syntactic, discourse-pragmatic), typological, ethnographic, sociolinguistic, and language contact approaches. The analyses of oral corpora include comparisons between monolingual and contact varieties of the speech of bilingual speakers who are native speakers of an indigenous Amazonian variety. This collection contributes to the fields of Hispanic and Amerindian Linguistics, and language contact.
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Early African Caribbean Newspapers as Archipelagic Media in the Emancipation Age shows how two Black-edited periodical publications in the early decades of the nineteenth century worked towards emancipation through medium-specific interventions across material and immaterial lines. More concretely, this book proposes an archipelagic framework for understanding the emancipatory struggles of the Antiguan Weekly Register in St. John’s and the Jamaica Watchman in Kingston. Complicating the prevalent narrative about the Register and the Watchman as organs of the free people of color, this book continues to explore the heterogeneity and evolution of Black newspaper print on the liberal spectrum. As such, Early African Caribbean Newspapers makes the case that the Register and the Watchman participated in shaping the contemporary communication market in the Caribbean. To do so, this study engages deeply with both the textuality and materiality of the newspaper and presents fresh visual material.
La vida de la beata Juana de Jesús (1662-1703)
La construcción de la santidad en la región andina. Resumen breve de la vida de la beata Juana de Jesús (1662-1703) es una edición comentada de la hagiografía de Juana de Jesús escrita por su confesor, Antonio Fernández Sierra durante la primera década del siglo XVIII. Este manuscrito, abandonado durante mucho tiempo en los archivos de Quito, fue muy popular entre los intelectuales del siglo XVIII e incluso sirvió de base para otras dos hagiografías, ambas escritas aproximadamente cincuenta años después. Este estudio de una de las primeras hagiografías escritas en la periferia del imperio español en América del Sur, revela la compleja relación entre los discursos religiosos y protonacionalistas que tuvieron lugar en el Quito colonial.

La construcción de la santidad en la región andina. Resumen breve de la vida de la beata Juana de Jesús (1662-1703) is an annotated edition of the hagiography of Juana de Jesús written by her confessor, Antonio Fernández Sierra, during the first decade of the eighteenth century. Long abandoned in the archives in Quito, this manuscript was well known to eighteenth century intellectuals and served as the basis for two other hagiographies, both written approximately fifty years later. One of the first hagiographies from the periphery of the Spanish empire in South America, this volume allows the contemporary reader to trace the complex interweaving of religious and proto-nationalist discourses that emerged in colonial Quito.
Imagining Latinidad examines how Latin American migrants use technology for public engagement, social activism, and to build digital, diasporic communities. Thanks to platforms like Facebook and YouTube, immigrants from Latin America can stay in contact with the culture they left behind. Members of these groups share information related to their homeland through discussions of food, music, celebrations, and other cultural elements. Despite their physical distance, these diasporic virtual communities are not far removed from the struggles in their homelands, and migrant activists play a central role in shaping politics both in their home country and in their host country.

Contributors are: Amanda Arrais, Karla Castillo Villapudua, David S. Dalton, Jason H. Dormady, Carmen Gabriela Febles, Álvaro González Alba, Yunuen Ysela Mandujano-Salazar, Anna Marta Marini, Diana Denisse Merchant Ley, Covadonga Lamar Prieto, María del Pilar Ramírez Gröbli, David Ramírez Plascencia, Jessica Retis, Nancy Rios-Contreras, and Patria Román-Velázquez.
American Moravians and their Neighbors, 1772-1822, edited by Ulrike Wiethaus and Grant McAllister, offers an interdisciplinary examination of Moravian Americanization in the Early Republic. With an eye toward the communities that surrounded Moravian settlements in the Southeast, the contributors examine cultural, social, religious, and artistic practices of exchange and imposition framed by emergent political structures that encased social privilege and marginalization.
Through their multidisciplinary approach, the authors convincingly argue that Moravians encouraged assimilation, converged with core values and political forces of the Early Republic, but also contributed uniquely Moravian innovations. Residual, newly dominant, and increasingly subjugated discourses among Moravians, other European settlers, Indigenous nations and free and enslaved communities of color established the foundations of a new Moravian American identity.

Contributors include: Craig D. Atwood, David Bergstone, David Blum, Stewart Carter, Martha B. Hartley, Geoffrey R. Hughes, Winelle Kirton-Roberts, Grant P. McAllister, Thomas J. McCullough, Paul Peucker, Charles D. Rodenbough, John Ruddiman, Jon F. Sensbach, Larry E. Tise, Riddick Weber, and Ulrike Wiethaus.