Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 29 items for :

  • Classical Studies x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Just Published x
  • Nach Ebene eingrenzen: All x
  • Status: Published x
Clear All
Through new readings and interpretation of Cypriot inscriptions – written in Cypriot-syllabic Greek, Eteocypriot, Phoenician, and alphabetic Greek – Kypriōn Politeia, the Political and Administrative Systems of the Classical Cypriot City-Kingdoms is the first book which reconstructs in detail the political and administrative systems of the Classical city-kingdoms of Cyprus. The book investigates the bodies of government beyond the Cypriot kings and the roles played by magistrates and officials in local governments, it analyses accounts of the headquarters of the main administrative and economic activities – such as palace archives, and tax collection hubs –, and demonstrates that these systems were similar in all the city-kingdoms.
Before serving as Bishop of Constantinople and becoming known to posterity as "the Theologian", Gregory of Nazianzus was an Athens-trained professional teacher of Greek literature. Steeped in the rhetorical culture of the Second Sophistic, his orations for Christian feasts such as Christmas and Pentecost belong to a Classical tradition that privileged the performance of philosophy at festivals. Widely copied and translated, they were instrumental in Gregory becoming one of the most popular and influential authors in Byzantium. This book shows how his orations represent a crucial point in the Late Antique reception of Platonism, rhetorical theory, and ancient festival culture.
Editor: Stefan Schorn
This volume is part of the continuation of Felix Jacoby’s monumental collection of fragmentary Greek historiography. It contains new editions of the Greek paradoxographers of the Imperial Period and of uncertain date, fragmentary and non-fragmentary alike. It also includes the fragments of the related types of works On rivers and On stones. For the first time, all these texts have been provided with a comprehensive commentary. Together with volume IV E 1, this will constitute a new corpus of Greek paradoxography which will make Greek thought on the marvelous accessible to scholars of antiquity and later times.
Reception, Translation, and Comparison
Volume Editors: Thomas J. Sienkewicz and Jinyu Liu
Ovid in China offers a fresh look at an ancient Roman author in a Chinese context and often from a Chinese perspective. The seventeen essays in this volume, by a group of international scholars, examine Ovid’s interaction with China in a broad historical context, including the arrival of Christian missionaries in 1294, the depiction of Ovidian scenes on 18th-century Chinese porcelain, the growing Chinese interest in Ovid in the early 20th century, a 21st-century collaborative project to translate Ovid’s poetry into Chinese with commentary, and comparative studies on such themes as conceptualization of time, consolation, laughter, filicide, and revenge.
Qualités et vertus de l’empereur dans les inscriptions d’Auguste au début du règne de Constantin: « Miroirs au prince »?
Volume Editor: Anne Gangloff
This anthology provides valuable new insights into discussions about the virtues, qualities, and position of the emperor in the Roman world (especially with regard to the perception of imperial dominion in the eastern provinces) by systematically focusing on documentary sources, i.e. inscriptions in particular. In addition, the assembled texts contribute to the study of Roman political thought, shaped by earlier traditions primarily during the Principate and the beginning of the Later Roman Empire.
Cet ouvrage collectif apporte de nouveaux éclairages précieux aux discussions sur les vertus, les qualités, la position de l'empereur dans le monde romain (notamment sur la perception de la domination impériale dans les provinces orientales), en se concentrant systématiquement sur les sources, c'est-à-dire les inscriptions en particulier. Les textes réunis contribuent également à l'étude de la pensée politique romaine, façonnée par des traditions antérieures, surtout pendant le Principat et le début de l’Antiquité Tardive.
This first in-depth study of Valerius Flaccus’ animals reveals their role in his poetic programme and the manifold ways in which he establishes their subjectivity. In one encounter, a trapped bird becomes a tragic victim, while the trapper is dehumanized. Elsewhere there are touching portrayals of animal/human camaraderie and friendship. Furthermore, Valerius’ provocative consideration of the ‘monstrous’ challenges simplistic definitions of any being’s nature, or the nature of relationships across species. His challenge entails profound ethical implications for his Roman readership, which resonate with us as we assess our own relationship to animals and the natural world today.
Volume 2 of the two-volume set MITS 56: In 1508, Johannes Trithemius, the Black Abbot, dedicated his Polygraphia, a treatise on writing in ciphers, to Emperor Maximilian I, personally handing over an elaborate autograph. Unlike the editio princeps, which was to be printed a decade later, the manuscript retains the arcane and mysterious tone of the bibliophile scholar’s earlier works on the subject. This book offers the first critical edition and translation of this first version, together with an extensive commentary illuminating the numerous obscure allusions, the impressive literary knowledge of its author, and the genesis of the mechanisms discussed.
Author: Jean Maurais
Much can be learned about a translation’s linguistic and cultural context by studying it as a text, a literary artifact of the culture that produced it. However, its nature as a translation warrants a careful approach, one that pays attention to the process by which its various features came about. In Characterizing Old Greek Deuteronomy as an Ancient Translation, Jean Maurais develops a framework derived from Descriptive Translation Studies to bring both these aspects in conversation. He then outlines how the Deuteronomy translator went about his task and provides a characterization of the work as a literary product.
Volume 1 of the two-volume set MITS 56: In 1508, Johannes Trithemius, the Black Abbot, dedicated his Polygraphia, a treatise on writing in ciphers, to Emperor Maximilian I, personally handing over an elaborate autograph. Unlike the editio princeps, which was to be printed a decade later, the manuscript retains the arcane and mysterious tone of the bibliophile scholar’s earlier works on the subject. This book offers the first critical edition and translation of this first version, together with an extensive commentary illuminating the numerous obscure allusions, the impressive literary knowledge of its author, and the genesis of the mechanisms discussed.