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This book offers a survey of the constitution of the French memoir tradition, and explores in detail the works of four representative authors: Philippe de Commynes, Louise de Savoie, Philippe de Cheverny, and François de Bassompierre. Works of self-writing were usually printed under the title of “memoirs” and have been often considered a uniform genre. These early forms of self-writing were in fact highly heterogenous works at the crossroads of multiple genres, from the account book to the astrological diary. Their writing, printing, and circulation challenge modern notions of autobiographical genres: their authorship is often questionable and collective, and they tended to be compiled in large collections for political ends, without regard to the authors’ intention.
News in Times of Conflict traces the development and spread of the newspaper and the development of the printing industry in Germany in the first half of the seventeenth century. Based on an inspection of all printed newspapers of this period, the book offers an overview over the regional and thematic reporting and the development of journalistic styles and ethics.
It offers an examination of the coverage of two major events: the death of the Swedish king Gustavus Adolphus, and the execution of King Charles I of England. These case studies provide the opportunity for a comparison with the newspaper markets in France, England and the Low Countries, and with the provision of news through manuscript newsletters.
Civil War and the Emergence of a Transnational News Culture in France and the Netherlands, 1561–1598
This book explores the reception of foreign news during the late sixteenth-century civil wars in France and the Netherlands. Analysing a large body of French and Dutch chronicles, Rosanne Baars innovatively demonstrates that the wider public was well aware of events abroad, though interest in foreign conflicts was far from constant. She sheds new light on the connections between the Dutch Revolt and the French Wars of Religion: contemporaries were gradually more inclined to see these wars as part of an international struggle. Baars argues that these times of civil war made inhabitants of both countries more apt at distinguishing rumour from reliable reports, thus contributing to the emergence of a public of critical news consumers.
Volume Editors: Clifford Davidson and Sophie Oosterwijk
This edition of John Lydgate’s Dance of Death offers a detailed comparison of the different text versions, a new scholarly edition and translation of Guy Marchant’s 1485 French Danse Macabre text, and an art-historical analysis of its woodcut illustrations.
It addresses the cultural context and historical circumstances of Lydgate’s poem and its model, the mural of 1424-25 with accompanying French poem in Paris, as well as their precursors, notably the Vado mori poems and the Legend of the Three Living and the Three Dead. It discusses authorship, the personification and vizualisation of Death, and the wider dissemination of the Dance. The edited texts include commentaries, notes, and a glossary.
Over the past few decades, a growing number of studies have highlighted the importance of the ‘School of Salamanca’ for the emergence of colonial normative regimes and the formation of a language of normativity on a global scale. According to this influential account, American and Asian actors usually appear as passive recipients of normative knowledge produced in Europe. This book proposes a different perspective and shows, through a knowledge historical approach and several case studies, that the School of Salamanca has to be considered both an epistemic community and a community of practice that cannot be fixed to any individual place. Instead, the School of Salamanca encompassed a variety of different sites and actors throughout the world and thus represents a case of global knowledge production.

Contributors are: Adriana Álvarez, Virginia Aspe, Marya Camacho, Natalie Cobo, Thomas Duve, José Luis Egío, Dolors Folch, Enrique González González, Lidia Lanza, Esteban Llamosas, Osvaldo R. Moutin, and Marco Toste.
Volume Editor: Thom Gobbitt
In Law | Book | Culture in the Middle Ages fifteen contributions are brought together, each taking a detailed view on the role of manuscripts and the written word in legal cultures and literate representations thereof. Four broad thematic approaches exploring the manuscript contexts and reception, of law and legal thought are considered: Law-Books, Law & Society, Legal Practice, and Text & Edition. The studies span the medieval period and reach across western and central Europe, closely considering facets of manuscript culture and legal literacies and practices from what are now Bulgaria, England, France and Germany, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway and Wales.
Contributors are Rolf H. Bremmer, Jr., Hannah Burrows, Sonia Colafrancesco, Jan van Doren, Stefan Drechsler, Daniela Fruscione Pistoresi, Thom Gobbitt, Katherine J. Har, Lucy Hennings, Petar Parvanov, Fangzhe Dimurjan Qiu, Ben Reinhard, Sara Elin Roberts, Francesco Sangriso, and Chiara Simbolotti.
In: Law | Book | Culture in the Middle Ages