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This book attends to the most essential, lucrative, and overlooked business activity of early modern Europe: the trade of paper. Despite the well-known fact that paper was crucial to the success of printing and record-keeping alike, paper remains one of the least studied areas of early modern history. Organised into three sections, ‘Hotspots and Trade Routes’, ‘Usual Dealings’, and ‘Recycling Economies’, the chapters in the collection shed light on the practices, materials, and networks of the paper trade. Altogether, the collection uncovers the actors involved in the networks of paper production, transportation, purchase, and reuse, between the thirteenth and nineteenth centuries and across the central and peripheral papermaking regions of Europe.
This book offers a survey of the constitution of the French memoir tradition, and explores in detail the works of four representative authors: Philippe de Commynes, Louise de Savoie, Philippe de Cheverny, and François de Bassompierre. Works of self-writing were usually printed under the title of “memoirs” and have been often considered a uniform genre. These early forms of self-writing were in fact highly heterogenous works at the crossroads of multiple genres, from the account book to the astrological diary. Their writing, printing, and circulation challenge modern notions of autobiographical genres: their authorship is often questionable and collective, and they tended to be compiled in large collections for political ends, without regard to the authors’ intention.
Author: Dirk Imhof

Abstract

As of 1620 Balthasar Moretus I envisioned a new edition of the famous polyglot Bible that his grandfather Christopher Plantin had printed in Antwerp in the years 1568-1572. While he searched for the necessary type, he had the Jesuit Petrus Lansselius stay in Antwerp for several years to prepare a revised text and commentaries. After seven years of preparation it became clear that he would never be able to complete his project. The appearance of the first volume of the Parisian Polyglot in 1628 made it clear that he was too late and that he had to abandon the entire project. With this article I will demonstrate the importance of having strong support for prestigious editions. Even if a publisher had gathered enough financial means and all the type and paper that were necessary for printing his desired publication, without external backing it was extremely difficult to realize his dream.

In: Quaerendo
In: Early Modern French Autobiography
In: Early Modern French Autobiography
In: Early Modern French Autobiography
In: Early Modern French Autobiography
In: Early Modern French Autobiography
In: Early Modern French Autobiography
In: Early Modern French Autobiography