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Author: David T. Runia
This volume is a further continuation of the annotated bibliographies on the writings and thought of the Jewish exegete and philosopher Philo of Alexandria, following those on the years 1937–1986 published in 1988, 1987–1996 published in 2000 and 1997–2012 published in 2012. Prepared in collaboration with the International Philo Bibliography Project, it contains a complete listing of all scholarly writings on Philo for the period 2007 to 2016. Part One lists texts, translations, commentaries etc. (75 items). Part Two contains critical studies (1143 items). In Part Three additional items up to 2006 are presented (27 items). In all cases a summary of the contents of the contribution is given. Six indices, including a detailed Index of subjects, complete the work.
A wide range of specialists provide a comprehensive overview of the reception of Pythagorean ideas in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, shedding new light especially on the understudied ‘Medieval Pythagoras’ of the Latin West. They also explore the survival of Pythagoreanism in the Arabic, Jewish, and Persian cultures, thus adopting a multicultural perspective. Their common concern is to detect the sources of this reception, and to follow their circulation in diverse linguistic areas. The reader can thus have a panoramic view of the major themes belonging to the Pythagorean heritage – number philosophy and the sciences of the quadrivium; ethics and way of life; theology, metaphysics and the soul – until the Early Modern times.
This volume, examining the reception of ancient rhetoric, aims to demonstrate that the past is always part of the present: in the ways in which decisions about crucial political, social and economic matters have been made historically; or in organic interaction with literature, philosophy and culture at the core of the foundation principles of Western thought and values. Analysis is meant to cover the broadest possible spectrum of considerations that focus on the totality of rhetorical species (i.e. forensic, deliberative and epideictic) as they are applied to diversified topics (including, but not limited to, language, science, religion, literature, theatre and other cultural processes (e.g. athletics), politics and leadership, pedagogy and gender studies) and cross-cultural, geographical and temporal contexts.
Brill’s Companion to the Reception of Homer from the Hellenistic Age to Late Antiquity presents a comprehensive account of the afterlife of the Homeric corpus. Twenty chapters written by a range of experts in the field show how Homeric poems were transmitted, disseminated, adopted, analysed, admired or even criticized across diverse intellectual environments, from the late 4th century BCE to the 5th century CE. The volume explores the impact of Homer on Hellenistic prose and poetry, the Second Sophistic, the Stoics, some Christian writers and the major Neoplatonists, showing how the Greek paideia continued to flourish in new contexts.
Studies in Book History, the Classical Tradition, and Humanism in Honor of Craig Kallendorf
Habent sua fata libelli honors the work of Craig Kallendorf, offering studies in several fields in which he chiefly distinguished himself: the history of the book and reading, the classical tradition and reception studies, Renaissance humanism, and Virgilian scholarship with a special focus on the creative transformation of the Aeneid through the centuries. The volume is rounded out by an appreciation of Craig Kallendorf, including a review of his scholarship and its significance.

In addition to the topics mentioned above, the volume’s twenty-five contributions are of relevance to those working in the fields of classical philology, Neo-Latin, political philosophy, poetry and poetics, printing and print culture, Romance languages, art history, translation studies, and Renaissance and early modern Europe generally.

Contributors: Alessandro Barchiesi, Susanna Braund, Hélène Casanova-Robin, Jean-Louis Charlet, Federica Ciccolella, Ingrid De Smet, Margaret Ezell, Edoardo Fumagalli, Julia Gaisser, Lucia Gualdo Rosa, James Hankins, Andrew Laird, Marc Laureys, John Monfasani, Timothy Moore, Colette Nativel, Marianne Pade, Lisa Pon, Wayne Rebhorn, Alden Smith, Sarah Spence, Fabio Stok, Richard Thomas, and Marino Zorzi.
Proceedings of the Fourteenth Workshop of the International Network Impact of Empire (Mainz, June 12-15, 2019)
Volume Editors: Marietta Horster and Nikolas Hächler
This volume presents the results of the fourteenth workshop of the international network 'Impact of Empire'. It focuses on the ways in which Rome's dominance influenced, changed, and created landscapes, and examines in which ways (Roman) landscapes were narrated and semantically represented. To assess the impact of Rome on landscapes, some of the twenty contributions in this volume analyse functions and implications of newly created infrastructure. Others focus on the consequences of colonisation processes, settlement structures, regional divisions, and legal qualifications of land. Lastly, some contributions consider written and pictorial representations and their effects. In doing so, the volume offers new insights into the notion of ‘Roman landscapes’ and examines their significance for the functioning of the Roman empire.
Authors of Greek and Roman philosophical protreptics imitate a kind of exhortation initially associated with Socrates, creating a thread of typically protreptic intertextuality that classifies protreptic as a genre of philosophical literature. Tracing this intertextuality from the Socratic authors to Boethius, the book shows how Greek and Roman protreptics define philosophy as a revisionary form of education, articulate the ultimate goals of this education, and associate their authors and audiences with philosophy as a new discursive practice and a new way of living. These texts constitute the first chapter in the history of educational revision and thus offer thoughts that continue to inform every debate on educational goals.
This book asks why politically-powerful entities invested in the Amphiareion, a sanctuary renowned for its precarity and dependency. The answer lies in unravelling the intricacies of the shrine’s epigraphical record and the stories about the communities and individuals responsible for creating it. By explaining patterns in inscribed display against the backdrop of broader events and phenomena emerging within central Greece, this book revisits the Amphiareion’s narrative and emphasises its political implications for its neighbours. This interpretation offers new perspectives on the sanctuary and exposes agents’ manipulation of it in the course of reinventing their self-image in a changing Greek world.
Volume Editors: Antje Wessels and Jacqueline Klooster
Aetiologies seem to gratify the human desire to understand the origin of a phenomenon. However, as this book demonstrates, aetiologies do not exclusively explore origins. Rather, in inventing origin stories they authorise the present and try to shape the future. This book explores aetiology as a tool for thinking, and draws attention to the paradoxical structure of origin stories. Aetiologies reduce complex ambivalence and plurality to plainly causal and temporal relations, but at the same time, by casting an anchor into the past, they open doors to progress and innovation.
Amazonenepisoden als Bauform des Heldenepos
In Penthesilea und ihre Schwestern – Amazonenepisoden als Bauform des Heldenepos Susanne Borowski establishes Amazon-episodes as a gender-sensitive structural element of epic poetry. This is the first book that provides a comprehensive intertextual interpretation of all Amazon-episodes in Homer’s Iliad, Apollonius Rhodius’ Argonautica, Vergil’s Aeneid, Valerius Flaccusʼ Argonautica, Statiusʼ Thebaid, Silius Italicusʼ Punica and Quintus Smyrnaeus’ Posthomerica.
Where previous scholars have often interpreted Amazons as a symbol of transgressive behaviour, this study shows that they are universally respected warriors. Their appearance, descent, and aristeiai characterize their fighting as transgendered. This study offers new perspectives on the construction of gender in Graeco-Roman Epic.

Mit Penthesilea und ihre Schwestern – Amazonenepisoden als Bauform des Heldenepos weist Susanne Borowski nach, dass Amazonenepisoden eine genderrelevante Bauform des Epos sind. Sie untersucht erstmals aus literaturwissenschaftlicher Perspektive alle überlieferten Amazonenepisoden in Homers Ilias, Apollonius Rhodiusʼ Argonautica, Vergils Aeneis, Valerius Flaccusʼ Argonautica, Statiusʼ Thebais, Silius Italicusʼ Punica und Quintus Smyrnaeusʼ Posthomerica.
Interpretiert die bisherige Forschung Amazonen meist als Symbol von Grenzüberschreitung, erweist die intertextuelle Analyse dieser Studie vielmehr, dass sie unerschrockene, allseits respektierte Kriegerinnen sind. Ihr Äußeres, ihre Abstammung und ihre Aristien charakterisieren ihr Kämpfen durchgängig als transgendered. Die Studie eröffnet neue Perspektiven für die Konstruktion von Gender im griechisch-römischen Epos.