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Editor: SHAO Binhong
Authors: Manfred Elfstrom and Yao Li
China has become a land of protests, though the Chinese state possesses considerable administrative capacity. In this volume, Manfred Elfstrom and Yao Li provide an overview of Chinese contentious politics. They dig deep into major forms of social conflict, explore structural explanations for why protest occurs in China, and describe the ways in which various organizations and framings of issues by citizens affect how protests play out. Shifting to where grassroots activism ultimately leads, Elfstrom and Li survey China’s coercive and conciliatory institutions for maintaining social control, document and explain patterns in the state’s handling of different types of resistance, and examine the social and political impact of unrest. This work not only contributes to a deeper understanding of contentious politics and governance in China, but also provides insights for studies of social movements and authoritarian politics in general.
Editor: William Hurst
This collection includes seven essays translated from the leading Chinese-language journal Open Times. Bringing together a wide range of leading experts across several disciplines, this book offers critical insights on some of the most important questions of contemporary urban Chinese politics and society. Drawing on extensive research across different localities and issues in China, the chapters offer rich data and fresh analyses of the shifting contours of urban governance, social mobilization and contention, and mechanisms of social control in the new Millennium. Taken together, this collection represents the most comprehensive look in some years at how urban Chinese political institutions have adapted and responded to challenges and how social actors and groups have mobilized to press for redress of substantial new grievances.
Editor: SHAO Binhong
Political Economy of Globalization and China's Options offers the political economy of globalization and China’s options in response to globalization’s retrogression, and the construction of world order. What are the strategies for upgrading the competitiveness of an emerging major power? Why does world need a new concept of openness? What are the four major challenges for the world economy? How do Chinese scholars think of in an “Anti-Globalization” environment? What are the five major objectives of global politics? Besides answering these basic questions, we will also consider other issues: the triangular relationship among China, the United States, and Russia; Rise of China and transformation of international order; understanding nuclear security and safety issues from the perspective of global governance.
Theoretical Framework and Chinese Context
As China enters the second decade of the 21st century, it faces tremendous challenges and crisis. How did China arrive at this point of crisis? How do we understand the nature of the challenges? More than any existing study of reform-era China, this volume offers a theoretical discussion of the cultural and social roots of the reform. It does so for the purpose of further exploring whether or not it is possible to imagine alternatives. Contributors to this second volume of “Culture and Social Transformations in Reform Era China” address these questions by exploring some of the most contentiously debated topics including liberalism, human rights, rule of law, the state, capitalism, and socialism.
The Diasporic Mediasphere of Chinese Migrants in New Zealand
Author: Phoebe H. Li
What role does diasporic Chinese media play in the process of Chinese migrants' adaptation to their new home country? With China's rise, to what extent has the expansion of its "soft power" swayed the changing identities of the Chinese overseas? A Virtual Chinatown provides a timely and original analysis to answer such questions.

Using a media and communication studies approach to investigate the reciprocal relationship between Chinese-language media and the Chinese migrant community in New Zealand, Phoebe Li goes beyond conventional scholarship on the Chinese Diaspora as practised by social historians, anthropologists and demographers. Written in an accessible and reader-friendly manner, this book will also appeal to academics and students with interests in other transnational communities, alternative media, and minority politics.

Balance, Imbalance and Rebalance
Editor: SHAO Binhong
What is China's rightful place on the world stage? Will the world remain unipolar as signs of American decline appear to be mounting? How can China maintain a harmonious relationship with its neighbors? What does China intend to do with the new power and influence that appears to be at its disposal? In light of emergent post-2008 economic realities, how should China adjust its foreign economic relations? This volume, the first of its kind, gathers a collection of translations of influential essays, talks, and papers on Chinese foreign policy, national security, and foreign economic relations written by Chinese elites. Many papers have also served as propositions for policy prescriptions to China's leaders, the vast majority of which have to date only been available in Chinese.
Visual Political Communication in Popular Chinese Television Series has been granted the EastAsiaNet 2014 Award!

In Visual Political Communication in Popular Chinese Television Series, Florian Schneider analyses political discourses in Chinese TV dramas, the most popular entertainment format in China today. Schneider shows that despite their often nationalistic stories of glorious emperors and courageous officials, such programmes should not be mistaken for official propaganda. Instead, the highly didactical messages of such series are the outcome of complex cultural governance practices, which are influenced by diffuse political interests, commercial considerations, viewing habits, and ideological assumptions. Schneider argues that these interlinking factors lead to a highly restrictive creative environment and to conservative entertainment content that ultimately risks creating precisely the kind of passive masses that Chinese media workers and government officials are trying so hard to emancipate.