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The Codification of Islamic Criminal Law in the Sudan

Penal Codes and Supreme Court Case Law under Numayrī and al-Bashīr

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Olaf Köndgen

In The Codification of Islamic Criminal Law in the Sudan, Olaf Köndgen offers an in-depth analysis of the Sudan’s Islamized penal codes of 1983 and 1991, their historical, political, and juridical context, their interpretation in the case law of the Supreme Court, and their practical application. He examines issues that arise in sharīʿa criminal law, including homicide, bodily harm, unlawful sexual intercourse ( zinā, liwāṭ), rape, unfounded accusation of unlawful sexual intercourse ( qadhf), highway robbery ( ḥirāba), apostasy ( ridda), and alcohol consumption.

Drawing on a wide range of primary and secondary sources, a large number of previously untapped Supreme Court cases, and interviews with judges and politicians, Köndgen convincingly explains the multiple contradictions and often surprising aspects of one of the Arab world’s longest lasting applications of codified sharīʿa criminal law.

Olaf Köndgen won the DAVO Dissertation Prize 2014 for his Ph.D. thesis.

"This extremely well-documented study represents a milestone for the discussion of Islamic criminal law in the Muslim world as a whole and in the Sudan especially. Olaf Köndgen fills an academic void; his work deserves the greatest recognition, for its extraordinary quality, its thoroughness and systematic approach."
Prof. Günter Meyer, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz
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Edited by Anke Bartels, Lars Eckstein, Nicole Waller and Dirk Wiemann

Postcolonial Justice addresses a major issue in current postcolonial theory and beyond, namely, the question of how to reconcile an ethics grounded in the reciprocal acknowledgment of diversity and difference with the normative, if not universal thrust that appears to energize any notion of justice. The concept of postcolonial justice shared by the essays in this volume carries an unwavering commitment to difference within and beyond Europe, while equally rejecting radical cultural essentialisms, which refuse to engage in “utopian ideals” of convivial exchange across a plurality of subject positions. Such utopian ideals can no longer claim universal validity, as in the tradition of the European enlightenment; instead they are bound to local frames of speaking from which they project world.
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Human Rights and Development

Legal Perspectives from and for Ethiopia

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Edited by Eva Brems, Christophe Van der Beken and Solomon Abay Yimer

The papers by international and Ethiopian scholars included in Human Rights and Development: Legal Perspectives from and for Ethiopia focus on the interconnectedness between the protection of human rights and the achievement of development. The book adds to the international debate by providing a unique insight into the Ethiopian perspective on the nexus between rights and development and by discussing how this nexus manifests itself in the Ethiopian context. The comparative and international frameworks and examples constitute a valuable resource for the debate on human rights and development in Ethiopia, which is currently taking place in the context of the developmental state approach pursued by the Ethiopian government.
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The Law Reports of the Special Court for Sierra Leone

Volume III: Prosecutor v. Charles Ghankay Taylor (The Taylor Case)

Edited by Charles Chernor Jalloh and Simon Meisenberg

The Special Court for Sierra Leone was established through signature of a bilateral treaty between the United Nations and the Government of Sierra Leone in early 2002, making it the third modern ad hoc international criminal tribunal. The tribunal has tried various persons, including former Liberian President Charles Ghankay Taylor, for allegedly bearing "greatest responsibility" for serious violations of international humanitarian law committed during the latter half of the Sierra Leonean armed conflict. It completed its work in December 2013. A new Residual Special Court for Sierra Leone, based in Freetown and with offices in The Hague, has been created to carry out its essential “residual” functions.
This volume, which consists of three books and a CD-ROM and is edited by two legal experts on the Sierra Leone court, presents, for the first time in a single place, a comprehensive collection of all the interlocutory decisions and final trial and appeals judgments issued by the court in the case Prosecutor v. Charles Ghankay Taylor. The Taylor case is the jewel in the crown of the SCSL, as it was the first ever trial and conviction of a former African head of state for crimes committed in a neighboring state. It is also one of a handful of such significant cases in international criminal law.
The Taylor Law Report contains the full text of all substantive judicial decisions, including the majority, separate and concurring as well as dissenting opinions and probably the longest trial judgment ever issued by an international criminal court. It additionally provides relevant information for a better understanding of the case, such as the indictments, a list of admitted exhibits and a list of documents on the case file.
This book set, which is the third in a series of edited law reports that follows volume 1 (on Prosecutor v. Brima, Kamara and Kanu – the so-called “AFRC case” published in November 2012) and volume 2 ( Prosecutor v. Norman, Fofana and Kondewa – the “CDF case” published in March 2014) seeks to capture the entire jurisprudential legacy of the tribunal, fills the gap for a single and authoritative reference source of the tribunal’s jurisprudence. These law reports, the last volumes of which will be published in 2015 and 2016, are intended for national and international judges, lawyers, academics, students and other researchers as well as transitional justice practitioners in courts, tribunals and truth commissions as well as anyone seeking an accurate record of the trials conducted by the Special Court for Sierra Leone.

N.B.: The hardback copy of this title contains a CD-ROM with the scanned decisions that are reproduced in the book and the trial transcripts.
The e-book version does not.
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Access to Information in Africa

Law, Culture and Practice

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Edited by Fatima Diallo and Richard Calland

For a long time, Africa has 'lagged' behind global advances in transparency, but there are now significant developments on the continent. In a ground-breaking book, Access to Information in Africa brings together for the first time a collection of African academics and practitioners to contribute to the fast-growing body of scholarship that is now accumulating internationally. This is therefore an African account of progress made and setbacks suffered, but also an account of challenges and obstacles that confront both policy-makers and practitioners. These challenges must be overcome if greater public access to information is to make a distinctive, positive contribution to the continent’s democratic and socio-economic future. This book offers a necessarily multi-dimensional perspective on the state of ATI in African jurisdictions and the emerging, new praxis - a praxis that will entail a genuine domestication of the right of access to information on the continent.
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The Law Reports of the Special Court for Sierra Leone (2 vols.)

Volume II: Prosecutor v. Norman, Fofana and Kondewa (The CDF Case)

Edited by Charles Chernor Jalloh and Simon Meisenberg

The Special Court for Sierra Leone was established through signature of a bilateral treaty between the United Nations and the Government of Sierra Leone in early 2002, making it the third modern ad hoc international criminal tribunal. The tribunal has tried various persons, including former Liberian President Charles Ghankay Taylor, for allegedly bearing "greatest responsibility" for serious violations of international humanitarian law committed during the latter half of the Sierra Leonean armed conflict.

This volume, which consists of two books and a CD-ROM and is edited by two legal experts on the Sierra Leone court, presents, for the first time in a single place, a comprehensive collection of all the interlocutory decisions and final trial and appeals judgments issued by the court in the case
Prosecutor v. Norman, Fofana and Kondewa (The CDF Case).
It contains the full text of all substantive judicial decisions, including the majority, separate and concurring as well as dissenting opinions. It additionally provides relevant information for a better understanding of the case, such as the indictments, a list of admitted exhibits and a list of documents on the case file.

The book, which is the second in a series of edited law reports that will capture the entire jurisprudential legacy of the tribunal, fills the gap for a single and authoritative reference source of the tribunal’s jurisprudence. It is intended for national and international judges, lawyers, academics, students and other researchers as well as transitional justice practitioners in courts, tribunals and truth commissions as well as anyone seeking an accurate record of the trials conducted by the Special Court for Sierra Leone.

N.B.: The hardback copy of this title contains a CD-ROM with the scanned decisions that are reproduced in the book and the trial transcripts.
The e-book version does not.
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The Law Reports of the Special Court for Sierra Leone (2 vols.)

Volume I: Prosecutor v. Brima, Kamara and Kanu (The AFRC Case)

Edited by Charles Chernor Jalloh and Simon Meisenberg

The Special Court for Sierra Leone was established through signature of a bilateral treaty between the United Nations and the Government of Sierra Leone in early 2002, making it the third modern ad hoc international criminal tribunal. The tribunal has tried various persons, including former Liberian President Charles Ghankay Taylor, for allegedly bearing "greatest responsibility" for serious violations of international humanitarian law committed during the latter half of the Sierra Leonean armed conflict.

This volume, which consists of two books and a DVD and is edited by two legal experts on the Sierra Leone court, presents, for the first time in a single place, a comprehensive collection of all the interlocutory decisions and final trial and appeals judgments issued by the court in the case Prosecutor v. Brima, Kamara and Kanu. It contains the full text of all substantive judicial decisions, including the majority, separate and concurring as well as dissenting opinions. It additionally provides relevant information for a better understanding of the case, such as the indictments, a list of admitted exhibits and a list of documents on the case file.

The book, which is only the first in a series of edited law reports that will capture the entire jurisprudential legacy of the tribunal, fills the gap for a single and authoritative reference source of the tribunal’s jurisprudence. It is intended for national and international judges, lawyers, academics, students and other researchers as well as transitional justice practitioners in courts, tribunals and truth commissions as well as anyone seeking an accurate record of the trials conducted by the Special Court for Sierra Leone.

N.B.: The hardback copy of this title contains a DVD with documents. The e-book version does not.