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The United Nations Declaration on Minorities

An Academic Account on the Occasion of its 20th Anniversary (1992-2012)

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Edited by Ugo Caruso and Rainer Hofmann

Created in order to celebrate the 20th Anniversary of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Persons Belonging to National or Ethnic, Religious and Linguistic Minorities (1992-2012), this publication aims to offer readers a comprehensive review, written by a variety of scholars in the field, of the value and impact of the standards formulated in the Declaration. In so doing, it hopes to stimulate attention for and debate around the Declaration and its principles. The regional perspectives and case studies included further enable the identification of positive initiatives and good practices as well as persistent gaps in the implementation of the standards enshrined in the Declaration.

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Edited by Tove H. Malloy and Ugo Caruso

In Minorities, their Rights, and the Monitoring the European Framework Convention for the Protection of National Minorities, Malloy and Caruso have collected a number of essays authored by prominent European experts on minority rights with aim to provide a first ever description and analysis of the processes guiding the monitoring of the Convention. The volume addresses both the technical and political side of the monitoring, and it brings in not only views from the host of the Convention, the Council of Europe, but also from the external players that interact with the Convention in the course of seeking to protect Europe’s national minorities

A Gateway between a Distant God and a Cruel World

The Contribution of Jewish German-Speaking Scholars to International Law

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Reut Yael Paz

Through a collective biographical methodology of four scholars (Hans Kelsen, Hans J. Morgenthau, Hersch Lauterpacht and Erich Kaufmann) this book investigates how Jewish identity and intellectual ties to Judaic civilisation in the German speaking and legal context influenced international law. By using biblical constitutive metaphors, it argues that Jewish German lawyers inherited, inter alia, a particular Jewish legal approach that ‘made’ their understanding of the law as a means to reach God. The overarching argument is that because of their Jewish heritage, Jewish scholars inherited the endorsement of earthly particularism for the sake of universalism and the other way around: for the sake of universalism, humanity’s differences need to be solved through the law.

State Continuity and Nationality: The Baltic States and Russia

Past, Present and Future as Defined by International Law

Ineta Ziemele

The International Law Commission, when drafting articles on nationality of persons in situations of State succession, omitted cases of unlawful territorial changes. These do not result in State succession; they may be dealt with under the rubric of State continuity. The Baltic – Russian cases show the particularly complex nature of these situations, both as concerns agreement on continuity and decisions on nationality. The author examines in detail the Citizenship Laws of the Baltic States and Russia, as well as relevant constitutional and international statements about the international legal status of the States and responses of the international community thereto. The main question addressed in the book is about solutions which States have to adopt concerning nationality of individuals in situations of State continuity, especially where States re-emerge after long years of occupation. Although the book is specific in its origin, it is of general importance because it draws conclusions concerning developments in law and practice which are relevant for a better understanding and regulation of nationality and statehood in international law.

Forging a Singaporean Statehood: 1965-1995

The Contribution of Japan

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Robin Ramcharan

This work takes an in-depth look at the muli-faceted contemporary relationship between Singapore and Japan since the end of World War II. It is the story of a relationship between an economic superpower, Japan, and an enterprising city-state whose leaders have sought to emulate not only Japan's economic success but several key facets of Japanese society as well. No other country surpasses Singapore in its public admiration of Japan. How is it possible for a multi-ethnic Singapore to emulate a relatively homogeneous Japan? What features of economic and political motives behind the attempt to emulate Japan? These and other questions are adressed in this work, which will be of interest to scholars of the international relations and security of East and Southeast Asia.