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In The Origins of the Canon of the Hebrew Bible: An Analysis of Josephus and 4 Ezra, Juan Carlos Ossandón Widow examines the thorny question of when, how, and why the collection of twenty-four books that today is known as the Hebrew Bible was formed. He carefully studies the two earliest testimonies in this regard—Josephus’ Against Apion and 4 Ezra—and proposes that, along with the tendency to idealize the past, which leads to consider that divine revelation to Israel has ceased, an important reason to specify a collection of Scriptures at the end of the first century CE consisted in the need to defend the received tradition to counter those that accepted more books.
This volume discusses crucial aspects of the period between the two revolts against Rome in Judaea that saw the rise of rabbinic Judaism and of the separation between Judaism and Christianity. Most contributors no longer support the ‘maximalist’ claim that around 100 CE, a powerful rabbinic regime was already in place. Rather, the evidence points to the appearance of the rabbinic movement as a group with a regional power base and with limited influence. The period is best seen as one of transition from the multiform Judaism revolving around the Second Temple in Jerusalem to a Judaism that was organized around synagogue, Tora, and sages and that parted ways with Christianity.
This extraordinary commentary by a late twelfth-century anonymous northern French exegete interprets the Song of Songs solely according to its plain meaning as a story of two young lovers and their developing relationship. The exegete pays attention to every detail of the text, offering many enlightening insights into its meaning, all the while expanding upon the “way of lovers” – the ways that young people in love go about their lovemaking. The French background of the exegete is made clear by numerous references to knights, coats of arms, weapons, chivalry, and of course, wine drinking. The edition is accompanied by an English translation and extensive introduction which analyzes the various linguistic, literary, and exegetical features of the text.
Between the New World and the Third World
Argentine Jews in the Age of Revolt traces the ongoing efforts among Argentine Jews to rethink the Argentine nation, Jewish membership in it, and the nature of Jewishness itself from 1955 to 1983. Beginning with the celebrations around the supposed triumph of the “liberal nation” after the overthrow of Juan Perón, this study examines Jewish activists’ discourse through years of rapid transitions between civil and military rule, massive social protest, escalating violence, and finally the brutal military dictatorship of 1976 to1983. It argues that these were crucial years in which Jewish activists forcefully discarded previous understandings of the nation and pioneered novel definitions of Jewishness and Zionism designed to resonate in a Latin America upended by revolutionary ferment.
The volume presents a selection of research projects in Digital Humanities applied to the “Biblical Studies” in the widest sense and context, including Early Jewish and Christian studies, hence the title “Ancient Worlds”. Taken as a whole, the volume explores the emergent Digital Culture at the beginning of the 21st century. It also offers many examples which attest to a change of paradigm in the textual scholarship of “Ancient Worlds”: categories are reshaped; textuality is (re-) investigated according to its relationships with orality and visualization; methods, approaches and practices are no longer a fixed conglomeration but are mobilized according to their contexts and newly available digital tools.
In Antisemitism in North America, the editors have brought together an impressive array of scholars from diverse disciplines and political orientations to assess the condition of the Jews in the United States, Canada, Mexico, and the Caribbean. The contributors do not always agree with each other, but they offer perspectives of why the Jewish experience in North America has neither been free from antisemitism nor ever so unwelcoming and dangerous as the countries from which they came. Contributors examine antisemitism in culture, politics, religion, law, and higher education.
Les intellectuels juifs de Bagdad. Discours et allégeances (1908-1951) raconte l’histoire d’un groupe d’intellectuels juifs de langue arabe à Bagdad. Faisant usage de sources historiques, Aline Schlaepfer examine les stratégies que ceux-ci mirent en place pour s’assurer une présence permanente dans la sphère publique en Irak. En analysant leurs discours et leurs allégeances, l'auteure montre qu’ils ne cessèrent jamais de s’exprimer publiquement sur les débats politiques les plus sensibles en Irak: nationalisme, communautarisme, colonialisme, nazisme et fascisme. Cet ouvrage suit leur parcours à travers une première moitié de XXe siècle irakien particulièrement agitée: la révolution jeune-turque de 1908, la création de l’Etat irakien (1920), plusieurs coups d’Etat (1936 et 1941), et la création de l’Etat d’Israël (1948), qui conduisit finalement à leur départ d’Irak en 1951.

In Les intellectuels juifs de Bagdad. Discours et allégeances (1908-1951), Aline Schlaepfer focuses on a group of Arabic-speaking Jewish intellectuals in Baghdad. Making use of historical materials, the author examines how strategies were negotiated by Jewish intellectuals in order to maintain a presence in the Iraqi public sphere. By analysing their discourses and allegiances, she shows that they continuously expressed their views on the most sensitive political debates in Iraq, such as nationalism, sectarianism, colonialism, Nazism and fascism. This work follows their trajectory during a turbulent period in Iraqi history; the 1908 Young-Turk Revolution, the creation of Iraq (1920), several coups d’état (1936 et 1941), and the creation of the State of Israel (1948), eventually leading to their departure from Iraq in 1951.

Judah ben Joseph Moscato (c.1533-1590) was one of the most distinguished rabbis, authors, and preachers of the Italian-Jewish Renaissance. His collection of sermons, Sefer Nefuṣot Yehudah, belongs to the very centre of his important homiletic and philosophical oeuvre. Composed in Mantua and published in Venice in 1589, the collection of 52 sermons addresses the subject of the Jewish festivals, focusing on philosophy, mysticism, sciences, and rites. This volume concludes the translation of the sermons and includes monographic studies about Moscato’s library, philosophical significance with an added Appendix containing his poetical compositions.
In The Fabric of Religious Life in Medieval Ashkenaz, Jeffrey R. Woolf presents the first integrated presentation of the ideals and beliefs that comprised the self-image and worldview of Ashkenazic Jews in the Central and High Middle Ages (900-1300). Through careful examination of a wide range of sources (legal, customal, liturgical, artistic), Woolf shows how religious practice played a dual role in creating and sustaining Jewish life in a hostile environment. They instilled these values, and recast religious traditions to reflect them.

The author demonstrates how hitherto underappreciated ideals such as Purity, Sanctity, and a palpable sense of Divine In-Dwelling played a central role in Ashkenazic religiousity and merged to form the texture, or the "Sacred Canopy," of their lives.
Volume II: The Birth of Jewish Historical Studies and the Modern Jewish Religious Movements
Author: Eliezer Schweid
Translator: Leonard Levin
The culmination of Eliezer Schweid’s life-work as a Jewish intellectual historian, this five-volume work provides a comprehensive, interdisciplinary account of the major thinkers and movements in modern Jewish thought, in the context of general philosophy and Jewish social-political historical developments, with extensive primary source excerpts.

Volume Two, "The Birth of the Jewish Historical Studies and the Modern Jewish Religious Movements," discusses the major Jewish thinkers of central and eastern Europe before 1881, in connection with the movements they fostered: German-Jewish Wissenschaft (Zunz), Reform (Formstecher, Samuel Hirsch, Geiger), Neo-Orthodoxy (S. D. Luzzatto, Steinheim, Samson Raphael Hirsch), Positive-Historical (Frankel, Graetz), and Neo-Haredi (Kalischer, Malbim, Hayyim Volozhiner, Salanter). In addition, extensive attention is given to the thinkers of the east-European Haskalah, both earlier (Levinsohn, Rubin, Schorr, Mieses, Abraham Krochmal) and later proto-Zionist thinkers (Zweifel, Smolenskin, Pines, Lilienblum).