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Diverse National Engagements with Paradoxes of Policy and Practice
Moving towards Inclusive Education: Diverse National Engagements with Paradoxes of Policy and Practice presents perspectives from Asia-Pacific and Europe that have seldom been heard in international debates. While there may be global consensus around United Nations' goals for inclusion in education, each country's cultural and religious understandings shape national views regarding the priorities for inclusion. Some countries focus on disability, while others bring in concerns about culture, ethnicity, language, gender and/or sexuality. In this fascinating collection, senior commentators explore the ethical difficulties as well as hopes for a more inclusive education in their countries, raising questions of interest for educators, policy-makers and all who support the work of inclusive education.

Contributors are: Vishalache Balakrishnan, Bayarmaa Bazarsuren, Cleonice Alves Bosa, Yen-Hsin Chen, Lise Claiborne, Tim Corcoran, Bronwyn Davies, Carol Hamilton, Dorothea W. Hancock, Mashrur Imtiaz, Maria Kecskemeti, Silvia Helena Koller, Yvonne Leeman, Sonja Macfarlane, Roger Moltzen, Sikder Monoare Murshed, Sanjaabadam Sid, Simone Steyer, Eugeniusz Świtała, Wiel Veugelers, and Ben Whitburn.
Critical Storytelling in 2020: Issues, Elections, and Beyond embraces the fierce urgency of the year 2020. This collection features timely research, critical stories, and engaging poetry written by undergraduate students, Master’s and Ph.D. students, recently-graduated students, and faculty. The authors hail from fields of Communication Studies, Education, Journalism, Media Arts & Studies, Creative Writing, Criminal Justice, Law, and Business/Organizational Communication. For those that share personal narratives and poems, we are drawn to witness how the personal is often political and the individual is often collective. For those that share more social-scientific papers (literature reviews, some with narrative sections), we are drawn to witness how the political is often personal and the collective is often individual. The year 2020 clearly is a year that highlights our complex reality of politics, personal and collective issues, and futures influenced by the present. This volume, in both direct and deviant ways, speaks to issues of pivotal import in the U.S. in a year that will see a crucial census, a historic election, and the momentous, yet-to-be-seen movement birthed from contested change and courageous critical storytellers. The authors herein dare to share their voices in written form and bravely offer their perspectives to us—their stories ring out beyond the written page.

Contributors are: Bowen Dong, Aurora Gross, Nicholas D. Hartlep, Brandon O. Hensley, Phelan Johnson, Miles Kinsman, Karen Chava Knox, Sarah Kominek, Emmitt Lewis, Sarita McKenney, Kelsey Mesmer, Taylor Nondorf, Julie M. Novak, Christopher Saleh, Daniel Socha, Ashley Teffer, and Kimberly Tracey.
Using a range of critical perspectives, On the Question of Truth in the Era of Trump closely examines notions of “truth in crisis” leading up to and after the election of Donald Trump. The authors explore how truth is constructed along the lines of race, social class, and gender as filtered through the self-referential characteristics of social media in particular. The authors assert that the US left has shown itself inadequate to the task of confronting right wing ideologies, which have only intensified since the 2016 election, resulting in increased mobilization of white supremacist and nationalist groups.

Whether underestimating Trump by downplaying the threat of his candidacy during the primaries, trivializing the concerns of women and minorities as “identity politics,” or rushing to prioritize the free speech rights of the far-right, left academics and the media have found themselves unable to use their traditional arsenal of evidence, rational discourse, and appeals to diversity of viewpoints.

The authors assert that political resistance to the right is not a matter of playful use of signs and symbols or discourse alone and has to be fought directly and in solidarity. At this point, it is clear that Trump and his supporters have not just deployed relativism as a form of strategy, but have fully weaponized it against their perceived enemies: women, immigrants, minorities, LGBTQ people along with educational, scientific, and journalistic institutions. It is hoped that this in-depth, critical dissection of truth in the current political reality will assist in the project of resistance.

Contributors are: Faith Agostinone-Wilson, Mike Cole, Jeremy T. Godwin, Jones Irwin, Austin Pickup, Daniel Ian Rubin, and Eric C. Sheffield.
A Guidebook for Teaching and Engaging with Critical Whiteness Studies
Author: Jennifer Beech
Despite hopeful—though problematic—proclamations about the end of racism after the election of our first African-American President, we are witnessing a backlash and renewed racism at this point in American and global history. Put simply, Critical Whiteness Studies (CWS) has as much exigency now as ever. Critical Whiteness Studies is an interdisciplinary project—with scholars from legal studies, literature and rhetorical studies, film and visual studies, class and feminist theorists, etc.—that contributes to critical race theory. Scholars tend to posit whiteness as an ideological, political, legal, and social fiction that places so-called whites in a position of hegemony over other non-dominant groups. The project, then, functions to unmask and interrogate these fictions. As part of critical multi-cultural and race theory, the project is anti-oppressive.

Those new to CWS are often unfamiliar with much of the court cases referenced and the critical terminology used by scholars in the field. As such White Out: A Guidebook for Teaching and Engaging with Critical Whiteness Studies is designed to orient readers to the history and purpose of CWS, to key concepts and legal cases, and to established and newer texts and resources. For educators wishing to include CWS in their workshops or courses, this guidebook also includes pedagogical resources ranging a sample syllabus to sample assignments and student texts to advice for structuring a dialogic workshop or classroom.

Student contributors are: Thomas Drake Farmer, Daniel Giraldo, Abby Graves, Elaine Ruby Gunn, Faith Jones, and Connor McPherson.
Tensions, Threats, and Opportunities in the Sustainable Development Goal on Quality Education
Editor: Antonia Wulff
For the third time in three decades world leaders reaffirmed their promise of "Education For All" when adopting Sustainable Development Goal 4 in 2015. It is the most far-reaching commitment to quality and equity in education so far, yet, there is no consensus on what the agenda means in practice.

With a decade left until the 2030 deadline, Grading Goal Four calls upon the education community to engage more thoughtfully and critically with SDG 4 and related efforts. As an ever-growing number of actors and initiatives claim to contribute to its achievement, it is becoming clear that the ambitious but broad priorities within the goal are vulnerable to cherry-picking and misrepresentation, placing it at the heart of tensions between instrumentalist and rights-based approaches to education. This text, a critical analysis of SDG 4, provides a framework for examining trends and developments in education globally.

As the first volume that examines early implementation efforts under SDG 4, Grading Goal Four formulates a critique along with strategies for moving forward. By scrutinising the challenges, tensions and power dynamics shaping SDG 4, it advances rights-based perspectives and strategies for effective implementation and builds capacity for strengthened monitoring and analysis of the goal.
Pathways to Education Reform for Urban Youth Culture
Author: Nadira Jack
Integrating experience and observations with theoretical ideologies and philosophical dispositions, the author provides a refreshing methodology and vision to the development of curriculum and instruction for administrative leaders, educators and policymakers in an urban education setting.

Collectively combing her administrative and instructional experience as an educator, principal and superintendent, she shares with readers a new pedagogical approach that emphasizes principles of collaboration and co-investigation among educators and students to explore universal life lessons and confront systemic oppression that impact urban youth. The Pedagogy of Consciousness is one that emphasizes a humanizing approach to education with balanced partnerships and shared connections among educators and students. The promise of this compelling model is that it collectively revitalizes a broken, disenfranchised system, while demonstrating the capacity to revolutionize urban education and transform lives.

The book opens up with a historical analysis of education, beginning with its inception and culminating with its present state of affairs, confronting systemic inequities and modes of standardization that still permeate today. The author provokes administrative leaders and educators to value student diversity and rethink the architecture of the traditional school systems by placing students at the forefront of their education through the co-development of curriculum and learning themes that impact their lives on a daily basis.

The Pedagogy of Consciousness provides innovative measures for educators and students alike to recognize the excellence that they were born with. The model, which is based on the dynamic disposition of education as a fluid, organic process, highlights relationship building among educators and students as a core element necessary to create a classroom culture based upon facets of loyalty, trust and mutual respect. To this end, educators and students investigate issues that affect their lives on a daily basis to experience self-growth and liberation that ultimately transcends into a shift in perception, thoughts and action. Embedded in the model is also the use of coping mechanisms and daily affirmations that allow students to recognize the highest form of one’s inner consciousness.

The author demonstrates the importance of leading educational reform through teaching students that they are pillars of their own success.
Author: Linda Cooper
Workers’ Education in the Global South explores the historical development of radical workers’ education in South Africa as one particular strand within the broader tradition of radical adult education. Drawing on the theoretical resources of Activity Theory, Gramsci, Freire and others, it investigates the key features of workers’ education as a form of pedagogy with a unique history and logic of practice, and explores how it has been shaped by its location within labour and other social movements as well as its ‘southern’ location within the global political economy. Successive chapters explore its counter-hegemonic but contested purposes, its knowledge practices that seek to overcome the historical divide between intellectual and manual labour, and a pedagogy which often assumes didactic forms but which retains a democratic character through its embeddedness in working class experience. It illustrates the rich processes of experiential learning that happen through day-to-day organising, in workers’ cultural activity as well as through mass action. It argues that this tradition of workers’ education currently stands at a crossroads, as global neoliberal market policies and post-apartheid education and training policies threaten to undermine its radical social vision, and concludes by offering ideas on how this tradition of radical workers’ education might be renewed.
The “Strong Poet”: Essays in Honor of Lous Heshusius is an edited volume focused on the research, scholarship, and leadership of one of the earliest proponents of radical change in the field of special education. This volume is part of the series Critical Leaders and the Foundation of Disability Studies in Education, a collective history of the ecology of ideas that gave way to the emergence of the field of Disability Studies in Education (DSE). The series formalizes the value of attending to a history, distinguished by Steve Taylor (2005), as one that existed before it was named DSE. In this volume the contributors borrow from the venerable life work of Lous Heshusius, to center her original claims, early research, and the enduring challenge she posed to special education against examples from their own practice and personal histories. Each chapter recovers aspects of the genius of Heshusius that ultimately disrupted status quo thinking about disability. Specifically her attention to recognizing the lives and desires of those that society too often relegates to categories and contexts devoid of self-direction and authentic agency. In brief, we find in Heshusius, a researcher who sought to privilege the voice of individuals with disability. She was among those who drew from and elaborated upon the methods and tools of qualitative research.

Contributors are: Julie Allan, Alicia A. Broderick, Danielle M. Cowley, Deborah J. Gallagher, Emily A. Nusbaum, and Linda Ware.
Activist Identity Development of Transgender Social Justice Activists and Educators introduces an anti-oppressive, critical and intersectional approach to social justice activism and education, and adult education for social change. This book examines how state governments, laws, policies, institutions, and systems of dominant hegemonic ideologies, such as education systems, the legal systems, and their gatekeepers influence the social position and epistemic agency of transgender and gender non-conforming people (TGNC), therefore shaping their social justice activist and educator identity development. The research was conducted with eight TGNC social justice activists and educators from eight different countries, who were at the time in leadership positions in organizations working on the advancement of LGBTQI human rights.

This volume seeks not only to understand and interpret power structures, power relations and inequalities in society which determine social positionality of trans activists and influence the formation and development of their activist identity, but also to challenge them by raising critical consciousness, questioning dominant cultural, political, and social domains which determine knowledge production. It advocates for a trans-affirming, intersectional approach to educational provision, theory, and research.
A Decolonizing Approach to Community-Based Action Research
Many community health interventions fail, wasting tax dollars and human resources. These interventions are typically designed by subject matter experts who don’t have direct experience with the local community. In contrast, successful interventions are built from the ground up, planned and implemented by the people that will benefit from them, using community-based action research. Researching With: A Decolonizing Approach to Community-Based Action Research is a guide for how to do research that is inclusive, engages in community-building, and implements a decolonizing framework. This text advocates for a collaborative approach, researching with communities, rather than conducting research on them. Reviewing both theory and method, Jessica Smartt Gullion and Abigail Tilton offer practical tips for forming community partnerships and building coalitions. Researching With also includes helpful information about incorporating community work into a successful academic career. This book can be used as supplemental or primary reading in courses in sociology, social work, health research, nursing, public health, qualitative inquiry, and research methods, and is also of value to individual researchers and graduate students writing their thesis.