Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 167 items for :

  • Search level: All x
  • Status (Books): Published x
Clear All
Commemorating the Legacy of James Legge (1815-1897)
Author: Alexander Chow
This volume explores the important legacy of Scottish missions to China, with a focus on the missionary-scholar and Protestant sinologist par excellence James Legge (1815–1897). It challenges the simplistic caricature of Protestant missionaries as Orientalizing imperialists, but also shows how the Chinese context and Chinese persons “converted” Scottish missionaries in their understandings of China and the broader world.

Scottish Missions to China brings together essays by leading Chinese, European, and North American scholars in mission history, sinology, theology, cultural and literary studies, and psychology. It calls attention to how the historic enterprise of Scottish missions to China presents new insights into Scottish-Chinese and British-Chinese relations.

Contributors are: Joanna Baradziej, Marilyn L. Bowman, Alexander Chow, Gao Zhiqiang, Joachim Gentz, David Jasper, Christopher Legge, Lauren F. Pfister, David J. Reimer, Brian Stanley, Yang Huilin, Zheng Shuhong.
Buddhist Statecraft in East Asia explores the long relationship between Buddhism and the state in premodern times and seeks to counter the modern, secularist notion that Buddhism, as a religion, is inherently apolitical. By revealing the methods by which members of Buddhist communities across premodern East Asia related to imperial rule, this volume offers case studies of how Buddhists, their texts, material culture, ideas, and institutions legitimated rulers and defended regimes across the region.
The volume also reveals a history of Buddhist writing, protest, and rebellion against the state.
Contributors are Stephanie Balkwill, James A. Benn, Megan Bryson, Gregory N. Evon, Geoffrey C. Goble, Richard D. McBride II, and Jacqueline I. Stone.
Author: Hans Derks
Both Karl Marx and Max Weber inspired the writing of the two volumes of The Market and the Oikos. Weber coined a market versus oikos contradiction, in which oikos not only means house, household or family, but later also the state, while Marx saw a town versus country antagonism. Both scholars, however, explained insufficiently these most complicated concepts, let alone some mutual relationships. This second volume, The Market and the Oikos, Vol. II: The Peasant and the Nomad in History, continues the analysis of their antagonisms in their mutual relationships by providing the main practical characteristics in different historical, economic and sociological contexts, based on the writing of Max Weber as explained in Vol. I. While the first volume tried to characterize the relationships from economic and historical points of view, this second volume takes a historical/sociological angle. In both volumes, Hans Derks’ argument proceeds from early world historical examples to the present context of contemporary China, stressing the highly neglected role of nomads in history.
Volume Editor: C.X. George Wei
Considering the important impact of Asian cultures on international relations, we conducted a multifaceted analysis and authentic summary of the Asian experiences and patterns of dealing with foreign relations from an Asian insider’s perspective, aiming to find out where the diverging or converging diplomatic ways of the West and the East came from and what the positive diplomatic values and practices originated from Asian traditions are.
Focusing on China, volume one thoroughly analyses the nature, political culture and mechanism of the tribute system from ancient time to the modern era within and beyond China. Volume two studies the culture and diplomacy of various individual Asian nations except for China, both in general and in particular cases, with an interdisciplinary approach.

考慮到亞洲文化對國際關係之影響的特殊重要性, 我們從一個亞洲局内人的角度, 對亞洲處理對外關係的經歷和模式進行了多方面的分析和真實可信的總結, 以發現在哪裏東西方的外交方式出現了分歧或聚合, 以及什麽是源於亞洲傳統的具有積極意義之外交價值觀. 卷一集中于中國, 徹底分析了朝貢體系的本質, 政治文化及其從古至近代以及在中國境外的延申和演變.
卷二以跨學科的方式, 探討了除中國以外亞洲各國不同的文化和外交, 既有綜合分析, 也有個案研究.
A Traditional Song Text from Guangxi in Southern China
Editors / Translators: David Holm and Meng Yuanyao
This is an annotated edition of a traditional song text, written in the Zhuang character script. The Brigands’ Song is part of a living tradition, sung antiphonally by two male and two female singers. The song is probably unique in presenting the experiences of ordinary men and women during wartime in pre-modern China. The narrative relates how the men are sent off to war, fighting as native troops on behalf of the Chinese imperial armies. The song dates from the Ming dynasty and touches on many topics of historical significance, such as the use of firearms and other operational details.
By examining the life and thought of self-exiled Chinese intellectuals after 1949 by placing them in the context of the global Cold War, Kenneth Kai-chung Yung argues that Chinese intellectuals living in Hong Kong, Taiwan and overseas Chinese communities in the 1950s could not escape from the global anti-utopian Cold War currents. Each of them responded to such currents quite differently. Yung also examines different models of nation-building advocated by the émigré intellectuals and argues in his book that these émigré intellectuals inherited directly the multifaceted Chinese liberal tradition that was well developed in the Republican era (1911–1949). Contrary to existing literature that focus mostly on the New Confucians or the liberals, this study highlights that moderate socialists cannot be ignored as an important group of Chinese émigré intellectuals in the first two decades of the Cold War era. This book will inspire readers who are concerned about the prospects for democracy in contemporary China by painting a picture of the Chinese self-exiles’ experiences in the 1950s and 1960s.
Women, Media, and Colonial Modernity During the Interwar Years
Author: Sumei Wang
The East Asian Modern Girl reports the long-neglected experiences of modern women in East Asia during the interwar period. The edited volume includes original studies on the modern girl in Taiwan, Korea, Manchuria, Japan, Shanghai, and Hong Kong, which reveal differentiated forms of colonial modernity, influences of global media and the struggles of women at the time. The advent of the East Asian modern girl is particularly meaningful for it signifies a separation from traditional Confucian influences and progression toward global media and capitalism, which involves high political and economic tension between the East and West. This book presents geo-historical investigations on the multi-force triggered phenomenon and how it eventually contributed to greater post-war transformations.
Merchants and Missionaries in 16th and 17th Century Japan
Author: Mihoko Oka
Winner of the prize "Fundação Oriente – Embaixador João de Deus Ramos" of the Academia de Marinha 2021

This book attempts to depict certain aspects of the Portuguese trade in East Asia in the 16th and 17th centuries by analyzing the activities of the merchants and Christian missionaries involved. It also discusses the response of the Japanese regime in handling the systemic changes that took place in the Asian seas. Consequently, it explains how Jesuit missionaries forged close ties with local merchants from the start of their activities in East Asian waters, and there is no doubt that the propagation of Christianity in Japan was a result of their cooperation. The author of this book attempted to combine the essence of previous studies by Japanese and western scholars and added several new findings from analyses of original Japanese and European language documents.