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The Spatiality of the Hispanic Avant-Garde: Ultraísmo & Estridentismo, 1918-1927 is a thorough exploration of the meanings and values Hispanic poets and artists assigned to four iconic locations of modernity: the city, the cafés, means of transportation, and the sea, during the first decades of the 20th century. Joining important studies on Spatiality, Palomares-Salas convincingly argues that an unsolvable tension between place and space is at the core of the Hispanic avant-garde cultural production. A refreshing, transatlantic perspective on Ultraism and Stridentism, the book moves the Hispanic vanguards forward into broader, international discussions on space and modernism, and offers innovative readings of well-known, as well as rarely studied works.
Archaeological Case Studies
Material Encounters and Indigenous Transformations in the Early Colonial Americas brings together 15 case studies focusing on the early colonial history and archaeology of indigenous cultural persistence and change in the Caribbean and its surrounding mainland(s) after AD 1492. With a special emphasis on material culture and by foregrounding indigenous agency in shaping the diverse outcomes of colonial encounters, this volume offers new perspectives on early modern cultural interactions in the first regions of the ‘New World’ that were impacted by European colonization. The volume contributors specifically investigate how foreign goods were differentially employed, adopted, and valued across time, space, and scale, and what implications such material encounters had for indigenous social, political, and economic structures.

Contributors are: Andrzej T. Antczak, Ma. M. Antczak, Oliver Antczak, Jaime J. Awe, Martijn van den Bel, Mary Jane Berman, Arie Boomert, Jeb J. Card, Charles R. Cobb, Gérard Collomb, Shannon Dugan Iverson, Marlieke Ernst, William R. Fowler, Perry L. Gnivecki, Christophe Helmke, Shea Henry, Gilda Hernández Sánchez, Corinne L. Hofman, Menno L.P. Hoogland, Rosemary A. Joyce, Floris W.M. Keehnen, J. Angus Martin, Clay Mathers, Maxine Oland, Alberto Sarcina, Russell N. Sheptak, Roberto Valcárcel Rojas, Robyn Woodward
Holy Organ or Unholy Idol? focuses on the significance of the cult of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and its accompanying imagery in eighteenth-century New Spain. Lauren G. Kilroy-Ewbank considers paintings, prints, devotional texts, and archival sources within the Mexican context alongside issues and debates occurring in Europe to situate the New Spanish cult within local and global developments. She examines the iconography of these religious images and frames them within broader socio-political and religious discourses related to the Eucharist, the sun, the Jesuits, scientific and anatomical ideas, and mysticism. Images of the Heart helped to champion the cult’s validity as it was attacked by religious reformers.
Identidad y Exilio desde la Edad Moderna hasta nuestros días
Españoles en Europa: Identidad y Exilio desde la Edad Moderna a nuestros días focuses on exile as a great identifier of modern times. It constitutes a highly comprehensive view of Hispanic exile through a systematic, transnational and trans-historical perspective.

Exile has played an essential role within Europe, which is presented as a complex conglomerate of cultures and literary traditions in constant transformation and dialogue. In the particular case of Hispanic exile, an undeniable complexity arises throughout its history due to various political, economic, cultural and aesthetic factors and to the essential significance of absent figures in the formation of Hispanic culture and identity.

Españoles en Europea: Identidad y Exilio desde la Edad Moderna a nuestros días se concentra en el fenómeno del exilio como gran identificador de tiempos modernos, abordándolo sistemáticamente desde una innovadora perspectiva transnacional y transhistórica.

Europa se presenta como un complejo conglomerado de culturas y de tradiciones literarias en constante transformación y diálogo, donde el fenómeno del exilio ha desempeñado un papel esencial. En el caso particular del exilio hispánico, una clara complejidad se acentúa y agudiza a lo largo de su historia debido a diversos factores políticos, económicos, culturales y estéticos, siendo además innegable la influencia esencial que han tenido los ausentes en la formación de la cultura y la identidad del país.

Contributors: Beatriz Calvo Martín, Carlos Yebra López, Cristian Crusat, Dagmar Vandebosch, Isabel-Clara Lorda Vidal, Fernando Díaz Ruiz, Jorge L. Catalá-Carrasco, Kirsten Bakker, Konstantin Mierau, Manuel Aznar Soler, Manuel de la Fuente, María José González Dávila, Marije Hirstova.
Puentes culturales críticos entre África, Latinoamérica y España
Trans-afrohispanismos: puentes culturales críticos entre África, Latinoamérica y España is an innovative approach to Afro-Hispanic Studies. It focuses on the connections between peoples, territories, and media of expression at the confluence of Africa and the Hispanic world. The volume’s contributors apply perspectives from their respective areas of specialization to their examination of transcultural interactions in a diverse range of contexts. These include Equatorial Guinea, Western Sahara, Spain, Morocco, Afro-descendant communities in Latin America and transnational spaces generated by digital technologies and contemporary migration. The volume offers an expanded understanding of Afro-Hispanic Studies and serves as a model of inquiry in a field whose hallmark is the mobility of people and knowledge.

Trans-afrohispanismos: puentes culturales críticos entre África, Latinoamérica y España es una aproximación innovadora a los Estudios Afrohispánicos. Destaca las conexiones entre gentes, territorios y medios de expresión en la confluencia de África y el mundo hispánico. Estos incluyen Guinea Ecuatorial, el Sáhara Occidental, España, Marruecos, comunidades de afrodescendientes en América Latina y los espacios transnacionales originados por las tecnologías digitales y la migración. Este libro ofrece una visión más amplia de los Estudios Afrohispánicos. Adicionalmente, sirve de modelo de investigación en un campo cuya seña de identidad es la movilidad de gentes y conocimientos.

Contributors are: Joanna Allan, Eduard Arriaga, Antonio Becerra Bolaños, Justo Bolekia Boleká, Julia Borst, Milagros Carazas, Dosinda García-Alvite, Maya García de Vinuesa, Gloria Lara Millán, Alain Lawo-Sukam, Bahia Mahmud Awah, Dorothy Odartey-Wellington, Elisa Rizo, Nayra Pérez Hernández, Juliane Tauchnitz and Kofi Yakpo.
Visualizing Sensuous Suffering and Affective Pain in Early Modern Europe and the Spanish Americas is a trans-cultural collection of studies on visual treatments of the phenomena of suffering and pain in early modern culture. Ranging geographically from Italy, Spain, and the Low Countries to Chile, Mexico, and the Philippines and chronologically from the fourteenth to the eighteenth centuries, these studies variously consider pain and suffering as somatic, emotional, and psychological experiences.
From examination of bodies shown victimized by brutal public torture to the sublimation of physical suffering conveyed through the incised lines of Counter-Reformation engravings, the authors consider depictions of pain and suffering as conduits to the divine or as guides to social behaviour; indeed, often the two functions overlap.
In Ornamental Nationalism: Archaeology and Antiquities in Mexico, 1876-1911, Seonaid Valiant examines the Porfirian government’s reworking of indigenous, particularly Aztec, images to create national symbols. She focuses in particular on the career of Mexico's first national archaeologist, Inspector General Leopoldo Batres. He was a controversial figure who was accused of selling artifacts and damaging sites through professional incompetence by his enemies, but who also played a crucial role in establishing Mexican control over the nation's archaeological heritage.
Exploring debates between Batres and his rivals such as the anthropologists Zelia Nuttall and Marshall Saville, Valiant reveals how Porfirian politicians reinscribed the political meaning of artifacts while social scientists, both domestic and international, struggled to establish standards for Mexican archaeology that would undermine such endeavors.
The present studies on Brazilian modern art seek to specify some of the dominant contradictions of capitalism’s combined but uneven development as these appear from the global ‘periphery’. The grand project of Brasília is the main theme of the first two chapters, which treat the ‘ideal city’ as a case study in the ways in which creative talent in Brazil has been made to serve in the reproduction of social iniquities whose origins can be traced back to the agrarian latifundia. Further chapters scrutinise the socio-historical basis of Brazilian art, and develop, against the grain of the most prominent art historical approaches to modern Brazilian culture, a critical approach to the distinctly Brazilian visual language of geometrical abstraction. The book contends that, from the fifties up to today, formalism in Brazil has expressed the hegemony of the market.
The Collected Writings of David Craven
Art History as Social Praxis: The Collected Writings of David Craven brings together more than thirty essays that chart the development of Craven’s voice as an unorthodox Marxist who applied historical materialism to the study of modern art. This book demonstrates the range and versatility of David Craven’s praxis as a ‘democratic socialist’ art historian who assessed the essential role the visual arts play in imagining more just and equitable societies. The essays collected here reveal Craven’s lifelong commitment to exposing interstices between western and non-western cultures by researching the reciprocating influences between First- and Third-World artists, critics and historians.
Object Lives and Itineraries
In Painted Pottery of Honduras Rosemary Joyce describes the development of the Ulua Polychrome tradition in Honduras from the fifth to sixteenth centuries AD, and critically examines archaeological research on these objects that began in the nineteenth century. Previously treated as a marginal product of Classic Maya society, this study shows that Ulua Polychromes are products of the ritual and social life of indigenous societies composed of wealthy farmers engaged in long-distance relationships extending from Costa Rica to Mexico.

Drawing on concepts of agency, practice, and intention, Rosemary Joyce takes a potter's perspective and develops a generational workshop model for innovation by communities of practice who made and used painted pottery in serving meals and locally meaningful ritual practices.