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The Egyptian caricature is generally studied as part of Egyptian mass culture, and mainly discussed in the context of Egypt's anti-colonial resistance to British foreign rule, as part of the forging of a “national style". In Cartooning for a Modern Egypt, Keren Zdafee foregrounds the role that Egypt’s foreign-local entrepreneurs and caricaturists played in formulating and constructing the modern Egyptian caricature of the interwar years, that was designated for, and reflected, a colonial and cosmopolitan culture of a few. Keren Zdafee illustrates how Egyptian foreign-local caricaturists envisioned and evaluated the past, present, and future of Egyptian society, in the context of Cairo's colonial cosmopolitanism, by adopting a theoretical, semiotic, and historical approach.
Puentes culturales críticos entre África, Latinoamérica y España
Trans-afrohispanismos: puentes culturales críticos entre África, Latinoamérica y España is an innovative approach to Afro-Hispanic Studies. It focuses on the connections between peoples, territories, and media of expression at the confluence of Africa and the Hispanic world. The volume’s contributors apply perspectives from their respective areas of specialization to their examination of transcultural interactions in a diverse range of contexts. These include Equatorial Guinea, Western Sahara, Spain, Morocco, Afro-descendant communities in Latin America and transnational spaces generated by digital technologies and contemporary migration. The volume offers an expanded understanding of Afro-Hispanic Studies and serves as a model of inquiry in a field whose hallmark is the mobility of people and knowledge.

Trans-afrohispanismos: puentes culturales críticos entre África, Latinoamérica y España es una aproximación innovadora a los Estudios Afrohispánicos. Destaca las conexiones entre gentes, territorios y medios de expresión en la confluencia de África y el mundo hispánico. Estos incluyen Guinea Ecuatorial, el Sáhara Occidental, España, Marruecos, comunidades de afrodescendientes en América Latina y los espacios transnacionales originados por las tecnologías digitales y la migración. Este libro ofrece una visión más amplia de los Estudios Afrohispánicos. Adicionalmente, sirve de modelo de investigación en un campo cuya seña de identidad es la movilidad de gentes y conocimientos.

Contributors are: Joanna Allan, Eduard Arriaga, Antonio Becerra Bolaños, Justo Bolekia Boleká, Julia Borst, Milagros Carazas, Dosinda García-Alvite, Maya García de Vinuesa, Gloria Lara Millán, Alain Lawo-Sukam, Bahia Mahmud Awah, Dorothy Odartey-Wellington, Elisa Rizo, Nayra Pérez Hernández, Juliane Tauchnitz and Kofi Yakpo.
Belonging and Becoming in Self-Testimony
In Black South African Autobiography After Deleuze: Belonging and Becoming in Self-Testimony, Kgomotso Michael Masemola uses Gilles Deleuze’s theories of immanence and deterritorialization to explore South African autobiography as both the site and the limit of intertextual cultural memory. Detailing the intertextual turn that is commensurate with belonging to the African world and its diasporic reaches through the Black Atlantic, among others, this book covers autobiographies from Peter Abrahams to Es’kia Mphahlele, from Ellen Kuzwayo to Nelson Mandela. It proceeds further to reveal wider dimensions of angst and belonging that attend becoming through transcultural memory. Kgomotso Michael Masemola successfully marshalls Deleuzean theories in a sophisticated re-reading that makes clear the autobiographers’ epistemic access to wor(l)ds beyond South Africa.

The French invaded Algeria in 1830, and found a landscape rich in Roman remains, which they proceeded to re-use to support the constructions such as fortresses, barracks and hospitals needed to fight the natives (who continued to object to their presence), and to house the various colonisation projects with which they intended to solidify their hold on the country, and to make it both modern and profitable. Arabs and Berbers had occasionally made use of the ruins, but it was still a Roman and Early Christian landscape when the French arrived. In the space of two generations, this was destroyed, just as were many ancient remains in France, in part because “real” architecture was Greek, not Roman.
In: The Military and Colonial Destruction of the Roman Landscape of North Africa, 1830-1900
In: The Military and Colonial Destruction of the Roman Landscape of North Africa, 1830-1900
In: The Military and Colonial Destruction of the Roman Landscape of North Africa, 1830-1900
In: The Military and Colonial Destruction of the Roman Landscape of North Africa, 1830-1900
In: The Military and Colonial Destruction of the Roman Landscape of North Africa, 1830-1900