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Konstitution sowie Destitution von Subjekten ist auf die strukturbildende Kraft von Szenen angewiesen. Welche inszenatorischen Elemente sind an Bildung und Destabilisierung, ja Auslöschung des Subjekts beteiligt? Welches Wissen wird darin produziert?
In einem interdisziplinären Ansatz konturiert der Band das Verhältnis von Wahrnehmung und Wissen, Politik und szenischer Öffentlichkeit entlang der Schwerpunkte Tribunal, Folter und künstlerischen Verfahren der Selbstverletzung. So wie Tribunale an der Schnittstelle von Rechtsperformanz und Theatralität operieren, ist in der Folter die Verletzung des Subjekts Teil eines Gefüges aus Geheimhaltung, Offenbarung, Mitwisserschaft. Eperimentell erprobte und szenisch aufgeführte Desubjektivierung in künstlerischen Verfahren zeigen kulturelle und gesellschaftliche Restriktionen ebenso wie Vorstellungen über das Subjekt und dessen Grenzen.
Editors / Translators: David Holm and Yuanyao Meng
This is an annotated edition of a traditional song text, written in the Zhuang character script. The Brigands’ Song is part of a living tradition, sung antiphonally by two male and two female singers. The song is probably unique in presenting the experiences of ordinary men and women during wartime in pre-modern China. The narrative relates how the men are sent off to war, fighting as native troops on behalf of the Chinese imperial armies. The song dates from the Ming dynasty and touches on many topics of historical significance, such as the use of firearms and other operational details.
Author: Lou Prendergast
In Conscious Theatre Practice: Yoga, Meditation, and Performance, Lou Prendergast charts a theatre research project in which the notion of Self-realisation and related contemplative practices, including Bikram Yoga and Vipassana meditation, are applied to performance. Coining the term ‘Conscious Theatre Practice’, Prendergast presents the scripts of three publicly presented theatrical performances, examined under the ‘three C’s’ research model: Conscious Craft (writing, directing, performance; Conscious Casting; Conscious Collaborations.
The findings of this autobiographical project fed into a working manifesto for socially engaged theatre company, Black Star Projects. Along the way, the research engages with methodological frameworks that include practice-as-research, autoethnography, phenomenology and psychophysical processes, as well immersive yoga and meditation practice; while race, class and gender inequalities underpin the themes of the productions.
Game Studies Interdisziplinär
Der Band präsentiert interdisziplinäre Zugangsweisen zu Games und vereint fachwissenschaftliche und didaktische Perspektiven aus dem Bereich der Kulturwissenschaften.
Hierbei werden sowohl Indie-Games wie Path Out, Life is Strange und GRIS als auch Tripple-A-Titel wie Call of Duty, GTA und Legend of Zelda betrachtet. Schwerpunktbereiche des Bandes präsentieren unter anderem die Darstellung von Wissenschaft in Games sowie das Spannungsverhältnis von Bild und Storytelling. Es werden Phänomene wie die Werbestrategien der Bundeswehr, psychische Erkrankungen aber auch aktuelle Themen wie Flucht und Migration sowie ökosensible Kulturkritik erörtert.
Abhinavagupta on Dance and Dramatic Acting
Author: Elisa Ganser
What is Dance? What is Theatre? What is the boundary between enacting a character and narrating a story? When does movement become tinted with meaning? And when does beauty shine alone as if with no object? These universal aesthetic questions find a theoretically vibrant and historically informed set of replies in the oeuvre of the eleventh-century Kashmirian author Abhinavagupta. The present book offers the first critical edition, translation, and study of a crucial and lesser known passage of his commentary on the Nāṭyaśāstra, the seminal work of Sanskrit dramaturgy. The nature of dramatic acting and the mimetic power of dance, emotions, and beauty all play a role in Abhinavagupta’s thorough investigation of performance aesthetics, now presented to the modern reader.
Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond
Choreonarratives, a collection of essays by classicists, dance scholars, and dance practitioners, explores the uses of dance as a narrative medium. Case studies from Greek and Roman antiquity illustrate how dance contributed to narrative repertoires in their multimodal manifestations, while discussions of modern and contemporary dance shed light on practices, discourses, and ancient legacies regarding the art of dancing stories.
Benefitting from the crossover of different disciplinary, historical, and artistic perspectives, the volume looks beyond current narratological trends and investigates the manifold ways in which dance can acquire meaning, disclose storyworlds ranging from myths to individual life-stories, elicit the narratees’ responses, and generate powerful narratives of its own. Together, the eclectic approaches of Choreonarratives>/i> rethink dance’s capacity to tell, enrich, and inspire stories.

Contributors are Sophie M. Bocksberger, Iris J. Bührle, Marie-Louise Crawley, Samuel N. Dorf, Karin Fenböck, Susan L. Foster, Laura Gianvittorio-Ungar, Sarah Olsen, Lucia Ruprecht, Karin Schlapbach, Danuta Shanzer, Christina Thurner, Yana Zarifi-Sistovari, Bernhard Zimmermann
Editor: Jan Bloemendal
A peer-reviewed series on topics in early modern forms of theatre, theatricality and drama. Contributions may come from any of the disciplines within the humanities, such as theatre studies, musicology, literary history, art history, book history, church history, social history, cultural history, and history of ideas. The series aims to open up new areas of research or new approaches to early modern drama. It publishes monographs, collections of essays and key text editions.

The series publishes an average of one volume per year. The series' editor-in-chief is Jan Bloemendal.
Author: Samuel N. Dorf

Abstract

The representation of ancient Greek images seen on pottery stands out as one of the clearest sources of inspiration for Nijinsky’s 1912 Ballets Russes production of L’ Après-midi d’ un faune, and the adoption of these static poses from antiquity has been recognised as one of the ballet’s most innovative features. This paper places Nijinsky’s work within the larger discussions about ancient Greek dance and music circulating in Parisian artistic and intellectual communities and examines how these static images became narrative dance.

Theoretical writings on ancient Greek dance gained popularity among Parisian scholars through the widely read work of musicologist Maurice Emmanuel. His popular method of deriving ancient movement sequences from static images painted on vases was employed by Isadora Duncan as well as the choreographer Madame Mariquita, who trained countless dancers in erotic “Greek” dance throughout her long career; however, while Nijinsky, Duncan, Mariquita, and Emmanuel share a similar methodology for deriving their ideas of ancient dance, the resulting choreographies based on the same vase paintings are remarkably different.

This article demonstrates that Nijinsky’s Faune draws from a well of dance vocabularies put forth by scholars of antiquity and employed in the choreographed Greek fantasies of Duncan and Mariquita. Nijinsky’s statuesque Faune echoes Emmanuel’s theory of Greek poses but differs from the fluidity found in female-dominated interpretations of Greek dance. Examining Faune in relation to the academic theories of ancient dance and rhythm demonstrates how works in the repertoire of the Ballets Russes reverberated not only with musical and choreographic audiences but with a much larger historiographic project undertaken by archaeologists and scholars to narrate the Greek past.

In: Choreonarratives

Abstract

This chapter gives examples of how cross-cultural adaptation offers insights into ancient Greek dance (in particular the choral odes of tragedy) which are not accessible from the surviving evidence preserved in ancient texts and visual representations.

Over the past twenty years, the Thiasos Theatre Company’s adaptation of Euripides’ Hippolytos (1998–2016) involved setting the original Greek lyrics to Jaipongan from West Java, a dancing style which integrates folk dances (Ketuk Tilu) with classical Javanese forms (Pencak Silat and Tari Kerseus). Java gives us a living analogue of the culturally central combination of mask, song, dance, and drama characteristic of predominantly polytheistic traditions such as those of ancient Greece. (Java’s dance culture still manifests its roots in a polytheistic Hindu performance tradition even though Islam has become Indonesia’s main religion since the 16th century.)

By drawing on Thiasos’ adaptation of Euripides as Indonesian dance drama, this chapter aims to show 1) how seemingly irrelevant evocations of myth and ritual song relate to the central themes of the tragedy, 2) how the symmetry of paired tragic odes (in which the verbal content of each verse differs while following identical rhythms) amplifies the meaning of the choral performances, and 3) how complex it is to derive dance movements from choreographic terminology.

In: Choreonarratives

Abstract

Setting out from the first chapter of Aristotle’s Poetics, where dance is recognised as an independent art form capable of mimesis (1447a26–28), this chapter turns to Aristophanic comedy in order to trace dance scenes in ancient Greek drama at the end of the 5th and the beginning of the 4th centuries. Aristophanes’ comedies contain instructions for the staging (didaskaliai) written into the text, which disclose a wealth of information on the place of dance in these dramas. Two types of scenes are identified that typically feature dancing, namely search scenes as well as cult songs and dances—incidentally, elements of the dramatic plot that comedy shares with tragedy and satyr plays. Drawing on a fourfold typology of didaskaliai as well as metrical analysis, which helps to understand the character and pace of the dance scenes, the chapter discusses passages from Wasps, Acharnians, Thesmophoriazusae, Peace, Birds, and Wealth. It examines in particular the relationship between the dances and the comic plot, which becomes looser over time, and argues that dances, by their performative nature which they share with rituals, build a bridge between the dramatic plot and the world inhabited by the audience.

In: Choreonarratives