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Findings, Collections, Dispersals
In Ancient Marbles in Naples in the Eighteenth Century Eloisa Dodero aims at documenting the history of numerous private collections formed in Naples during the 18th century, with particular concern for the “Neapolitan marbles” and the circumstances of their dispersal. Research has thus made it possible to formulate a synthesis of the collecting dynamics of Naples in the 18th century, to define the interest of the great European collectors, especially British, in the antiquities of the city and its territory and to draw up a catalogue which for the first time brings together the nucleus of sculptures reported in the Neapolitan collections or coming from irregular excavations, most of which shared the destiny of dispersal, in some cases here traced in definitive fashion.
Editor: Carsten Jahnke
A Companion to Medieval Lübeck offers an introduction to recent scholarship on the vibrant and source-rich medieval history of Lübeck. Focusing mainly on the twelfth to fifteenth centuries, the volume positions the city of Lübeck within the broader history of Northern Germany and the Baltic Sea area. Thematic contributions highlight the archaeological and architectonical development of a northern town, religious developments, buildings and art in a Hanseatic city, and its social institutions. This volume is the first English-language overview of the history of Lübeck and a corrective to the traditional narratives of German historiography. The volume thus offers a fresh perspective on the history of medieval Lübeck—as well as a handy introduction to the riches of the Lübeck archives—to undergraduates, graduate students, and scholars in related fields.

Contributors are Manfred Finke, Hartmut Freytag, Antjekathrin Graßmann, Angela Huang, Carsten Jahnke, Ursula Radis, Anja Rasche, Dirk Rieger, Harm von Seggern and Ulf Stammwitz.
Antiquarianism, Classical Erudition and the Visual Arts in the Late Renaissance
Pirro Ligorio’s Worlds brings renowned Ligorio specialists into conversation with emerging young scholars, on various aspects of the artistic, antiquarian and intellectual production of one of the most fascinating and learned antiquaries in the prestigious entourage of Cardinal Alessandro Farnese. The book takes a more nuanced approach to the complex topic of Ligorio’s ‘forgeries’, investigating them in relation to previously neglected aspects of his life and work.
Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal, La collection des antiquités, Vol. 3, Les objets en métal et les gemmes
This is the third out of eight projected volumes making available to the public the contents in the collection of Greek and Roman Antiquities in one of Canada’s most prestigious museums. Here are presented a variety of metal objects (mostly bronze figurines, medical instruments, brooches, weaponry and a lead sarcophagus), the small collection of jewelry and the ancient gems and seal stones (mainly Roman) some still set in rings. Ce volume est le troisième de la série de huit volumes projetés qui vise à publier la collection des antiquités grecques et romaines d’un des grands musées canadiens. Nous présentons ici des objets métalliques très variés (surtout des statuettes de bronze, des instruments médicaux, des épingles, des armes et un sarcophage de plomb), un petit nombre de bijoux et de gemmes anciennes (surtout romaines) certaines encore serties dans une bague.
The collection Migration, Integration and Connectivity on the Southeastern Frontier of the Carolingian Empire offers insights into the Carolingian southeastern frontier-zone from historical, art-historical and archaeological perspectives.
Chapters in this volume discuss the significance of the early medieval period for scholarly and public discourses in the Western Balkans and Central Europe, and the transfer of knowledge between local scholarship and macro-narratives of Mediterranean and Western history. Other essays explore the ways local communities around the Adriatic (Istria, Dalmatia, Dalmatian hinterland, southern Pannonia) established and maintained social networks and integrated foreign cultural templates into their existing cultural habitus.
Contributors are Mladen Ančić, Ivan Basić, Goran Bilogrivić, Neven Budak, Florin Curta, Danijel Dzino, Krešimir Filipec, Richard Hodges, Nikola Jakšić, Miljenko Jurković, Ante Milošević, Marko Petrak, Peter Štih, Trpimir Vedriš.
Humanism and Antiquarian Culture in Renaissance Southern Italy
This volume offers the first comprehensive study of the De Nola (Venice 1514), a hitherto underappreciated Latin text written by the Nolan humanist and physician Ambrogio Leone. Furnished with four pioneering engravings made with the help of the Venetian artist Girolamo Mocetto, the De Nola is an impressively rich and multifaceted text, which contains an antiquarian (and celebratory) study of the city of Nola in the Kingdom of Naples. By describing antiquities, inscriptions, and buildings, as well as social and religious phenomena, the De Nola offers a precious window into a southern Italian Renaissance city, and constitutes a refined example of sixteenth-century antiquarianism. The work is analysed in a multidisciplinary approach, encompassing art and architectural history, antiquarianism, literature, social history, and anthropology.