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Maps and Territory-Building in the Northern Indochinese Peninsula (1885-1914)
Author: Marie de Rugy
Translator: Saskia Brown
This book delivers a connected history of imperial margins in Southeast Asia by comparing the British and French geographical policies and practices at the end of the 19th century. It focuses on a time of scramble in Asia: the English incorporated Upper Burma in the Raj after the third Anglo-Burmese war (1885), whereas the French created a protectorate on Annam-Tonkin (the Northern part of present-day Vietnam). The volume shows how these border areas, disputed by colonial and national states, have been represented and fashioned by different actors: British, French and Chinese empires, the Siam realm and local populations. Laying these discourses alongside the geographical practices of the time and emplacing both within the longue durée allows us to shed light on the original process of territorial construction that they generated.

This work is a translated and updated after the French work Aux confins des empires. Cartes et constructions territoriales dans le nord de la péninsule indochinoise (1885-1914) published by Éditions de la Sorbonne (Paris, France), in 2018.
Its Social and Cultural Significance
Author: Jiří Jákl
Brill’s Southeast Asian Library (SEAL) presents scholarly readers with outstanding scholarship covering all regions of Southeast Asia, especially mainland Southeast Asia, on topics from the past to the present day. Featuring both monographs and edited volumes, it offers rigorously peer-reviewed and enduring contributions from the full spectrum of humanities and social science disciplines.
Initiated in 1938, the ‘Verhandelingen’, or ‘VKI’, is the longest running series of monographs and edited volumes on the humanities and social sciences of Southeast Asia and especially Indonesia. So far, over 300 volumes have been published by internationally renowned scholars. The series’ publications include classics in their field as well as cutting-edge modern scholarship. Informed by theoretical debates the volumes have a strong empirical orientation, thus providing the series with a lasting relevance. Today, the editors focus on history and politics, archeology, anthropology and urban studies, media and popular culture, as well as literature and linguistics. Two sub-series, viz., Power and Place and Southeast Asia Mediated, respectively concentrating on local politics, and media and popular culture, foreground the series’ mission of exploring new topics and themes.

The first 100 volumes are available free of charge under a CC-BY-NC license here. The titles are clustered as VKI E-Book Collection, Vols. 1-100.
Editor / Translator: Paul Sidwell
Not only is May otherwise undescribed in writing, it is the only small Vietic language documented and analysed in such detail, and one of few endangered Austroasiatic languages described so thoroughly.
May is predominantly monosyllabic, yet retains traces of affixes and consonant clusters that reflect older disyllabic forms. It is tonal, and also manifests breathy phonation and vowel ongliding, yeilding a remarkable complexity of syllable types. The lexicon, which is extensively documented, has a substantial achaic component. Consequently, the volume provides an invaluable resource for comparative historical and typological studies.
This book is an English translation of the 2018 Russian language monograph by Babaev and Samarina.
Author: Jacob Cawthorne
Letters without Capitals: Texts and Practices in Kim Mun (Yao) Culture examines the writing culture of Kim Mun communities in Southeast Asia and China. The Kim Mun, who belong to the Yao ethnic group, are renowned for their Daoist religious practices and religious texts written in Chinese script. This work takes an unpublished Kim Mun letter that was composed in Laos and sent to Vietnam as its centrepiece. Through an analysis of the letter, one which uses ethnographic accounts of Kim Mun communities and studies of Kim Mun literary and religious texts, it demonstrates that writing is a cultural technology that primarily serves the purposes of the Kim Mun themselves, rather than being an artefact of historical and cultural relationships of dependency on external state institutions or religious constituencies. This has broad implications regarding our understanding of how writing can be adapted and deployed by minority communities on and beyond the margins of the state and of the underlying relationships between writing, identity and power.
Author: Wim van Zanten
Music of the Baduy People of Western Java: Singing is a Medicine by Wim van Zanten is about music and dance of the indigenous group of the Baduy, consisting of about twelve-thousand people living in western Java. It covers music for rice rituals, for circumcisions and weddings, and music for entertainment. The book includes many photographs and several discussed audio-visual examples that can be found on DOI: 10.6084/m9.figshare.c.5170520.

Baduy are suppposed to live a simple, ascetic life. However, there is a shortage of agricultural land and there are many temptations from the changing world around them. Little has been published on Baduy music and dance. Wim van Zanten’s book seeks to fill this lacuna and is based on short periods of fieldwork from 1976 to 2016.
Memory, Movement, and Modernities across Hemispheres
Series Editors:
Richard T. Chu, University of Massachusetts
Augusto F. Espiritu, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Mariam Lam, University of California, Riverside

For some time now, studies on Southeast Asians have often situated the experiences of these peoples within the territorial boundaries of their countries and within the regional framework of Southeast Asia. Geographically fixed to the Philippines, Thailand, Burma, Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam, Indonesia, Brunei, East Timor, and Singapore, Southeast Asia emerges, as critical area studies underscore, as a site marked by multivalent politics, histories, and cultures. The processes of globalization, neoliberalism, and war have unmoored such fixities in the Eastern as much as in the Western Hemispheres, causing tectonic shifts in the constructions of memory, massive population movements and migrations, and ever new projects and worldings responding to various regimes of the “modern.” Whereas Southeast Asian studies may remain regionally focused, Southeast Asian American studies must increase its focus on the understudied complex, transnational flows and manifold expressions of the Southeast Asian diasporic experience.

Attendant to the rise of the Southeast Asian diasporas, Global Southeast Asian Diasporas (SEAD) provides a peer-reviewed forum for studies that specifically investigate the histories and experiences of Southeast Asian diasporic subjects across hemispheres. We especially invite studies that critically focus on the Southeast Asian experience from a transnational, comparative, and international perspective. SEAD welcomes submissions from a wide array of disciplinary fields (including history, sociology, political science, cultural studies, literary studies, and anthropology, among others) that innovatively interrogate themes such as refugees, political asylum, gender/sexuality, colonialism, globalization, empire, nation/nationalism, ethnicity, and transnationalism.

Manuscripts should be at least 90,000 words in length (including footnotes and bibliography). Manuscripts may also include illustrations, tables, and other visual material. The editors will consider proposals for original monographs, edited collections, translations, and critical primary source editions.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the Publisher, Chunyan Shu.
Series Editors: David Holm and Yuanyao Meng
The Zhuang are a Tai-speaking people and China’s most populous minority. This series presents critical editions of traditional Zhuang texts, written in a character script based on Chinese but modified to represent the Zhuang language. Each volume will present a single text or a number of texts from the same locality or region, including ritual texts, song texts, play scripts, and other genres. Together, these works will serve to introduce many different aspects of Zhuang cultural life to an international readership.

Author: Farabi Fakih
In Authoritarian Modernization in Indonesia’s Early Independence Period, Farabi Fakih offers a historical analysis of the foundational years leading to Indonesia’s New Order state (1966-1998) during the early independence period. The study looks into the structural and ideological state formation during the so-called Liberal Democracy (1950-1957) and Sukarno’s Guided Democracy (1957-1965). In particular, it analyses how the international technical aid network and the dominant managerialist ideology of the period legitimized a new managerial elite. The book discusses the development of managerial education in the civil and military sectors in Indonesia. The study gives a strongly backed argument that Sukarno’s constitutional reform during the Guided Democracy period inadvertently provided a strong managerial blueprint for the New Order developmentalist state.