Religious Diffusion and Cross-fertilization beyond the Reach of the Central Tibetan Government
The volume brings together nine contributions presenting cutting-edge research on Ris med. The relatively high degree of political autonomy in the A mdo and Khams regions paved the way for the Rnying ma, Sa skya, Bka’ brgyud, Jo nang, and Bon traditions to closely collaborate with each other in a spirit of mutual respect and non-partiality ( ris med), while enjoying protection and support from local rulers. The contributors examine degrees of tolerance ranging from hierarchical inclusivism to genuine pluralism, inter-tradition relations and collaborations, religio-political entanglements, and the positions, writings and actions of the key figures of Ris med. Thus, they bring to light that Ris med cannot be reduced to its historical, political, religious or sociological facet, but is always a conglomerate of all of them.

Groundbreaking research by leading international Tibetan studies scholars Filippo Brambilla, Gabriele Coura, Douglas Duckworth, Adam C. Krug, Klaus-Dieter Mathes, Giacomella Orofino, Rachel H. Pang, Adam S. Pearcey, and Frédéric Richard.
Author: Zaifu Liu
Volume Editors: Howard Y. F. Choy and Jianmei Liu
Liu Zaifu 劉再復 is a name that has already been ingrained within contemporary Chinese literary history. This landmark volume presents Anglophone readers with Liu’s profound reflections on Chinese literature and culture at different times. The essays collected here demonstrate Liu’s historical experience and trajectory as an exiled Chinese intellectual who persistently safeguards the individuality and the autonomy of literature, refusing to succumb to political manipulation.

Liu’s theory of literary subjectivity has opened ways for Chinese writers to thrive and innovate. His panoramic view not only unravels the intricate interplay between literature and politics but also firmly regards the transcendental value of literature as a significant ground to subvert revolutionary dogmatism and criticize Chinese modernity. Rather than drawing upon the existing paradigm, he reinvents his own unique theoretical conceptions in order to exile the borrowed “gods.”
This series aims to publish authoritative, innovative and informative studies on topics in East Asian Buddhist philosophy (broadly construed) from any period, including the modern period. It is devoted to publishing specialist monographs on influential texts, thinkers and philosophical topics; broad comparative studies (such as, but not limited to, Buddhist and Confucian comparative philosophical studies, East Asian and Indian comparative philosophical studies, and East Asian and Western comparative philosophical studies), as well as more specialist studies on topics in Buddhist logic, epistemology, metaphysics, ontology and ethics. East Asian Buddhist Philosophy welcomes studies of how Indian philosophical materials were adopted, adapted, modified, recontextualized, and developed in China, Japan and Korea; as well as studies dealing with Korean and Japanese philosophical texts written in Chinese script.

Abstract

The article explores the extent to which experts from different countries share the same axiological approaches with regard to the dialogue among civilizations and international cooperation at governmental and grass-roots levels. The article shows how subject matter experts provide collaborative input into the features and limits that shape global universal values. Interactions among civilizations promoting their equality and partnership as opposed to clashes should be at the heart of the transformations of values. Such transformations are expected to foster mutual exchange and enrichment achieved through a deeper understanding of the inevitability of increasing global interconnectedness and mutual dependence.

In: Journal of Chinese Philosophy
Author: Lisa Raphals

Abstract

This paper addresses the location of virtue within a virtuous person. It examines the relations of body (shen 身, ti 體, xing 形, gong 躬), mind (xin 心) and spirit (shen 神) in the Shijing 詩經, which describes virtue (de 德) in terms of the bodies and minds of virtuous agents. I argue that virtue is attributed to outward behavior, rather than inner state, and that that behavior is described via the performance of the shen or gong body.

In: Journal of Chinese Philosophy
Author: Michael Nylan

Abstract

This essay provides an overview of the prescriptions advanced by the Han-era Documents classic, since it was indisputably the Documents that served as the chief guide to political philosophy in the early empires for members of the elite with the requisite high cultural learning. It presents the authoritative pronouncements of the Documents on a number of key issues, such as, Who has the legitimacy to rule? How shall the good ruler and his officials act to retain legitimacy? What is the best form of government? How are punishments to be applied? How are taxes and tribute, domestic and foreign policy, to be administered? It prescribes actions to further the virtues of foresightedness, compassion, and fairness.

In: Journal of Chinese Philosophy