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Editor: Joel Andreas
Over the past seven decades—since the 1949 Revolution—every aspect of Chinese society has been profoundly transformed multiple times. No sector has experienced more tumultuous twists and turns than industry. The eight articles contained in this volume examine these twists and turns, focusing on those aspects of industrial relations that involve contention and power, that is, factory politics. They were selected among articles that have appeared in the Chinese journal Open Times (开放时代) over the past decade. Because Open Times has a well-earned reputation for publishing diverse viewpoints, it has been able to attract some of the very best scholarship in China.
The World’s Oldest Encyclopaedia of Technologies
In Kao Gong Ji: The World’s Oldest Encyclopaedia of Technologies, Guan Zengjian and Konrad Herrmann offer an English translation and commentary of the first technological encyclopaedia in China. This work came into being around the 5th century C.E. and contains descriptions of thirty technologies used at the time. Most prominent are bronze casting, the manufacture of carriages and weapons, a metrological standard, the making of musical instruments, and the planning of cities. The technologies, including the manufacturing process and quality assurance, are based on standardization and modularization. In several commentaries, the editors show to which degree the descriptions of Kao Gong Ji correspond to archaeological findings.

Revised and updated translation from the Chinese edition:《考工记: 翻译与评注》(ISBN: 978-7-313-12133-2) by Guan Zengjian, © Shanghai Jiao Tong University Press 2014. Published by Shanghai Jiao Tong University Press.

Abstract

Ethical behavior in South Africa, and consequently in the workplace, is currently a highly topical issue. Hence it was decided to investigate whether demographic differences exist regarding work ethics, in order to guide organizational decision-making and to understand work behavior in a South African sample. The sample consisted of 301 respondents, and data was collected using the Multidimensional Work Ethics Profile (MWEP), which was developed to measure seven facets of work ethics. Inferential statistical analysis was performed to analyze the dataset. The results indicate that male respondents scored higher on delay of gratification in comparison to their female counterparts. Test results for tenure found that increased years of service influenced respondents’ scores positively in hard work and delay of gratification.

In: African and Asian Studies

Abstract

Most prior research on labor market mismatch was constrained by the unavailability of data on skill mismatch and also the absence of panel data which would provide controls for unmeasured heterogeneity. This paper makes use of the panel element of Korea Labor & Income Panel Survey (KLIPS) data and identifies the wage effects of educational mismatch and skill mismatch both separately and jointly. It clearly shows that only a small proportion of the wage effect of educational mismatch is accounted for by skill mismatch, suggesting a relatively weak relation between educational mismatch and skill mismatch. In the analysis appropriate panel methodology produces much weaker estimates of the relevant coefficients than the pooled OLS model. This result indicates that unobserved individual-specific characteristics play a substantial role in the way in which mismatch effects are determined.

In: African and Asian Studies

Abstract

This paper aims to understand the welfare mix in Korea by examining its historical origins and tracing its evolution during Japanese colonial rule. After locating the origins of the welfare mix in the early Chosŏn Dynasty, this study examines the evolution of the welfare mix in Korea under Japanese colonial rule. By focusing on repressiveness and recognition, the dual aspects of Japanese colonial rule, we reveal a traditional aspect of the Korean welfare mix that remained strong and was, paradoxically, reinforced under Japanese colonial rule. Following the establishment of a colonial centralised state, Japanese attempts to impose modern dispensational welfare systems proved inadequate. The Japanese were forced to return to traditional, informal welfare providers, such as kyes, to satisfy Chosŏn’s need for welfare. The paper concludes by arguing that this welfare mix can help to explain the welfare regime in modern Korea.

In: African and Asian Studies