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Epistolary Literature, Circulation, and The Gospels for All Christians
Author: David Smith
In The Epistles for All Christians, David Smith argues that epistolary literature offers analogous evidence of circulation to the Gospels. Since Richard Bauckham’s edited volume The Gospels for All Christians was published in 1998, debate over the validity of the contributors’ claims that the Gospels were written for “all Christians” has revolved around interpretation. Smith brings circulation to bear on the conversation.
Studying ancient media practices of publication and circulation and using social network theory, Smith makes a compelling case that if the evangelists did not expect their texts to circulate they would be atypical.
In the past years, reflections on Jewish literatures and theoretical and methodological approaches discussed in Comparative Literature have converged. Places and Forms of Encounter in Jewish Literatures. Transfer, Mediality and Situativity brings together close readings and contextualizations of Jewish literatures with theories discussed in Comparative and World Literature Studies. The contributions are arranged in five chapters capturing central processes, actors and dynamics in the making of literatures, namely Literary Agents, Literary Figures, Writing Voids, Making of Literatures and Perceiving and Creating Languages. The volume seeks to illuminate the interrelations between literary systems, and to highlight Jewish literatures as a prism for encounters on the levels of text, discourse and culture, and their transformative force.
Ce volume comporte un dossier sur la thématique du rire dans À la recherche du temps perdu. Toutes sortes de procédés rhétoriques, de multiples collusions avec le destinataire, un discours nourri de plaisir et d’intentions caustiques, donnent à cette dimension une place de première importance. Ironie raffinée qui subtilise les perspectives, satire mordante ou subreptice, burlesque caricatural et grotesque scabreux, humour bonhomme ou raillerie polissonne, moquerie ou sarcasme, toutes les nuances du rire, du plus léger au gros calibre, se rencontrent tout au long de l’apprentissage de ‘Marcel’.

This volume includes a major section on the theme of laughter in the Recherche. Various rhetorical processes, many collusions with the recipient, a discourse nourished with pleasure and caustic intentions, make that this dimension plays a prominent role. Sophisticated irony that subtilises the perspectives, harsh or subreptitious satire, caricatural burlesque and scabrous grotesque, good humour or rascally moquerie, sarcasm or derision, we encounter all kinds and variants of laughter, from the most gentle to its extremely furious manifestations, throughout the apprenticeship of ‘Marcel’.

Avec des contributions de/contributors: Paul Aron; Dominique Defer; Nell de Hullu-van Doeselaar; Karen Haddad; Sjef Houppermans; Didier Hurson; Mathieu Jung; Bérengère Moricheau-Airaud; Anne-Aël Ropars; Thanh-Vân Ton That; Manet van Montfrans; Ruud Verwaal; Philippe Willemart.
Reading Talmudic Sources as Arguments: A New Interpretive Approach elucidates the unique characteristics of Talmudic discourse culture. Approaching Talmudic literature from a linguistic perspective, the book shows the extensive and hidden ways in which later rabbis used early formulations. Applying Quentin Skinner's interpretive question “What was the author doing in composing the text in this particular way?" to Talmudic literature reveals that Talmudic debate is not only about ideas, concepts and laws but also about the latter's connection to pre-existing formulations. These early traditions, rather than only being accepted or not, are used by later generations to build their own arguments. The book articulates the function of tradition at the time that Rabbinic Judaism was forged.
The Judeo-Persian Rendition of the Buddha Biographies
The Prince and the Sufi is the literary composition of the seventeenth-century Judeo-Persian poet Elisha ben Shmūel. In The Prince and the Sufi: The Judeo-Persian Rendition of the Buddha Biographies, Dalia Yasharpour provides a thorough analysis of this popular work to show how the Buddha's life story has undergone substantial transformation with the use of Jewish, Judeo-Persian and Persian-Islamic sources. The complete annotated edition of the text and the corresponding English translation are thorough and insightful. This scholarly study makes available to readers an important branch in the genealogical tree of the Buddha Biographies.
Proceedings of the International Conference Held at the John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, 24–26 October 2017
Editor: Henryk Drawnel
The essays in Sacred Texts and Disparate Interpretations cover an array of core themes from various areas of Qumran studies, including textual criticism of the Hebrew Bible, Second Temple history, philology, paleography, Wisdom and religious poetry.
Contributors to this volume generally consider these themes from a historical perspective, trying to find new solutions to old questions and entering in constructive dialogue with the opinions of other scholars. Paleographic investigations, textual criticism as well as literary and philological approaches make this volume a valuable contribution to the variegated and often highly specialized directions of inquiry into the contents and historical background of the Dead Sea Scrolls.
In: Sacred Texts and Disparate Interpretations: Qumran Manuscripts Seventy Years Later