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Linguistic and Archaeological Perspectives on the Early Stages of Indo-European
Dispersals and diversification offers linguistic and archaeological perspectives on the disintegration of Proto-Indo-European, the ancestor of the Indo-European language family.
Two chapters discuss the early phases of the disintegration of Proto-Indo-European from an archaeological perspective, integrating and interpreting the new evidence from ancient DNA. Six chapters analyse the intricate relationship between the Anatolian branch of Indo-European, probably the first one to separate, and the remaining branches. Three chapters are concerned with the most important unsolved problems of Indo-European subgrouping, namely the status of the postulated Italo-Celtic and Graeco-Armenian subgroups. Two chapters discuss methodological problems with linguistic subgrouping and with the attempt to correlate linguistics and archaeology.

Contributors are David W. Anthony, Rasmus Bjørn, José L. García Ramón, Riccardo Ginevra, Adam Hyllested, James A. Johnson, Kristian Kristiansen, H. Craig Melchert, Matthew Scarborough, Peter Schrijver, Matilde Serangeli, Zsolt Simon, Rasmus Thorsø, Michael Weiss.
Christian Influences from Early Modern to Modern
The Transformations of Tragedy: Christian Influences from Early Modern to Modern explores the influence of Christian theology and culture upon the development of post-classical Western tragedy. The volume is divided into three parts: early modern, modern, and contemporary. This series of essays by established and emergent scholars offers a sustained study of Christianity’s creative influence upon experimental forms of Western tragic drama.
Both early modern and modern tragedy emerged within periods of remarkable upheaval in Church history, yet Christianity’s diverse influence upon tragedy has too often been either ignored or denounced by major tragic theorists. This book contends instead that the history of tragedy cannot be sufficiently theorised without fully registering the impact of Christianity in transition towards modernity.

Abstract

Religion and literature is the study of interrelationships between religious or theological traditions and literary traditions, both oral and written, with special attention to religious or theological underpinnings of, influences upon, and reflections in, individual “texts” (oral and written) or authors’ oeuvres. This overview considers the origins and history of, and methods employed in, that scholarly enterprise, focusing upon the dual construals of “literature” in religious studies (as a body of sacred writings and as writing valued for artistic merit); the problematics of defining “religion”; the transformation of theology and literature as a “field” (pioneered by Nathan A. Scott Jr. et al.) to religion and literature; the affiliated fields of myth criticism, and of biblical reception; and the institutionalization, globalization, and future of the study of religion and literature.

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Religion and the Arts

Abstract

Chardin wrote The Divine Milieu in 1927 (published in 1957). Waugh could not have known Chardin’s essay before the publication of Brideshead Revisited, but he demonstrates similar ideas concerning one’s spiritual development. A primary goal of both writers was to reconcile the apparent duality of matter and spirit. They argue for the necessity of individual freedom in one’s spiritual search, the value of creative work of all kinds in building spiritual insight, and the importance of perceiving divine influence at the center of all things.

In: Religion and the Arts
In: Religion and the Arts

Abstract

Renowned American protest painter George Tooker’s sacramental art opens new perspectives on the relation of the sacramental economy to modern cultural critique. Differing from extant scholarship and taking into account preparatory drawings, this article claims that George Tooker’s The Seven Sacraments altarpiece is best understood in continuity with the rest of the artist’s protest painting. This interpretation does not diminish the religious or conciliatory significance of Tooker’s masterwork but rather draws out its unique voice as a way of protesting the alone-while-together structures of American society. As western societies confront epidemics of loneliness amidst hyper-connectivity, Tooker suggests generative horizons by which sacramental theology might contribute to that conversation—not in posing a simple fix against existential loneliness, but showing forth sacraments as interconnected, graced practices which first and foremost acknowledge loneliness while at the same time denying it the power to be the final word.

In: Religion and the Arts
In: Religion and the Arts
In: Religion and the Arts
In: Religion and the Arts