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This book provides a new perspective on book history by exploring communities created by the production and consumption of printed material. Essays by leading scholars explore the connections between writers, printers, booksellers and readers and examine changes and continuities across the period 1500 to 1800. As well as investigating the networks behind the production and dissemination of printed material, this collection examines the ways in which readers consumed, used and shared their printed texts.
By focusing on the materiality of early modern texts, contributors to this volume offer new interpretations of the history of reading, the book trade, and the book as an object in early modern Europe.
The Journeys of Kalila and Dimna: Itineraries of Fables in the Arts and Literature of the Islamic World
Kalīla wa-Dimna is one of the best-known texts of medieval Arabic literature and counts among the most illustrated works in the Islamic world. The extent of the corpus and its journey through the ages make it the ideal material for a reflection on the evolution of iconography in Islamic art. The studies gathered in this volume edited by Eloïse Brac de la Perrière, Aïda El Khiari and Annie Vernay-Nouri, showcase a wide diversity of approaches that convincingly crosses textual investigation, codicology, iconographical study, and physico-chemical analyses. They explore new tracks, either by devoting themselves to the examination of unknown or rarely studied manuscripts, or by proposing innovative readings of this extremely rich work that is Kalīla wa-Dimna.

Kalīla wa-Dimna est l'un des textes les plus célèbres de la littérature arabe médiévale et compte parmi les œuvres les plus illustrées du monde islamique. L'étendue du corpus et son parcours à travers les âges en font un extraordinaire matériau pour mener une réflexion sur l’image dans l’histoire des arts islamiques. Les études rassemblées dans ce volume dirigé par Eloïse Brac de la Perrière, Aïda El Khiari et Annie Vernay-Nouri, mettent en œuvre une grande diversité d'approches croisant investigation textuelle, codicologique, iconographique et analyses physico-chimiques. Elles explorent toutes des pistes nouvelles, soit en se consacrant à l'examen de manuscrits inédits ou très rarement étudiés, soit en proposant des lectures innovantes de cette œuvre extrêmement riche qu’est Kalīla wa-Dimna.

Contributors: Eloïse Brac de la Perrière, Nathalie Buisson, Mounia Chekhab-Abudaya, Frantz Chaigne, Anna Contadini, Jean-Charles Coulon, Françoise Cuisance, Aïda El Khiari, Rajana Fatima Amalarajah, Béatrice Gruendler, Mika Natif, Bernard O’Kane, Hoa Perriguey, Yves Porter, Francis Richard, Valérie Saurel, Christine Van Ruymbeke, Annie Vernay-Nouri.
This volume celebrates and extends the extraordinary and transformative work of Ian Doyle on medieval manuscripts and their legacies. Eighteen original contributions by eminent international scholars of manuscript studies and history of the book present new research on textual issues, manuscript preservation and circulation, manuscripts and print, and the afterlives of manuscripts. Essays adopt the multi-faceted and nuanced approaches to manuscript studies and history of the book characteristic of Ian Doyle’s work, taking up topics to which his research has drawn attention, extending his studies of particular manuscripts, scribes and networks, and exploring his remarkable contributions to the field.

Contributors are: Ralph Hanna, Susan Powell, Julia Boffey, David Rundle, James Willoughby, Carol Meale, Martha Driver, William Marx, Veronica O'Mara, Richard Gameson, Kathleen Scott, Margaret Connolly, Richard Beadle, A. S. G. Edwards, Elizabeth Rainey, Pamela Robinson, Toshi Takamiya, Linne Mooney, and Derek Pearsall.
Author: Trude Dijkstra
Trude Dijkstra discusses how Chinese religion and philosophy were represented in printed works produced in the Dutch Republic between 1595 and 1700. By focusing on books, newspapers, learned journals, and pamphlets, this study sheds new light on the cultural encounter between China and western Europe in the early modern period. Form, content, and material-technical aspects of different media in Dutch and French are analysed, providing new insights into the ways in which readers could take note of Chinese religion and philosophy. This study thereby demonstrates that there was no singular image of Chinese religion and philosophy, but rather a varied array of notions on the subject.
Forgery and Early Modern Alchemy, Medicine and Natural Philosophy
Volume Editors: Didier Kahn and Hiro Hirai
The production of forgeries under the name of the Swiss physician Paracelsus (1493/94-1541) was an integral part of the diffusion of the Paracelsian movement in early modern Europe. Many of these texts were widely read and extremely influential. The inability of most readers of the time to distinguish the genuine from the fake amid the flood of publications contributed much to the emergence of Paracelsus’ legendary image as the patron of alchemy and occult philosophy. Innovative studies on largely overlooked aspects of Paracelsianism and an extensive catalogue of Paracelsian forgeries make this volume an essential resource for future studies.

Contributors are Tobias Bulang, Dane T. Daniel, Charles D. Gunnoe, Jr., Hiro Hirai, Didier Kahn, Julian Paulus, Lawrence M. Principe, and Martin Žemla.

Originally published as Special Issue of the journal Early Science and Medicine, volume 24 (2019), no. 5-6 (published February 2020), with a revised Introduction and a new Appendix by Julian Paulus, entitled “A Catalogue Raisonné of Pseudo-Paracelsian Writings: Texts Attributed to Paracelsus and Paracelsian Writings of Doubtful Authenticity,” has been added.
Volume Editors: Megan Henvey, Amanda Doviak, and Jane Hawkes
Bringing together the work of scholars from disparate fields of enquiry, this volume provides a timely and stimulating exploration of the themes of transmission and translation, charting developments, adaptations and exchanges – textual, visual, material and conceptual – that reverberated across the medieval world, within wide-ranging temporal and geographical contexts. Such transactions generated a multiplicity of fusions expressed in diverse and often startling ways – architecturally, textually and through peoples’ lived experiences – that informed attitudes of selfhood and ‘otherness’, senses of belonging and ownership, and concepts of regionality, that have been further embraced in modern and contemporary arenas of political and cultural discourse.
Contributors are Tarren Andrews, Edel Bhreathnach, Cher Casey, Katherine Cross, Amanda Doviak, Elisa Foster, Matthias Friedrich, Jane Hawkes, Megan Henvey, Aideen Ireland, Alison Killilea, Ross McIntire, Lesley Milner, John Mitchell, Nino Simonishvili, and Rachael Vause.
Widely read as school texts, the comedies by the Roman dramatist Terence have come down to us in hundreds of medieval copies. Fourteen of the manuscripts produced between 800 and 1200 were given some kind of illustration. In this volume, Beatrice Radden Keefe explores the semiotics of the imagery found in the earliest illustrated Terence manuscripts, and its relationship to the iconography of comedy and theatre from antiquity. She examines six further manuscripts to show how later illustrators abandoned this imagery to varying degrees, finding new emphases and creating new layers of meaning. Illustrators of Terence, it is demonstrated here, brought a range of interests to illustrating the comedies, clarifying their narrative, incorporating social commentary and moralisation, and linking them with Christian allegorical traditions.