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This book attends to the most essential, lucrative, and overlooked business activity of early modern Europe: the trade of paper. Despite the well-known fact that paper was crucial to the success of printing and record-keeping alike, paper remains one of the least studied areas of early modern history. Organised into three sections, ‘Hotspots and Trade Routes’, ‘Usual Dealings’, and ‘Recycling Economies’, the chapters in the collection shed light on the practices, materials, and networks of the paper trade. Altogether, the collection uncovers the actors involved in the networks of paper production, transportation, purchase, and reuse, between the thirteenth and nineteenth centuries and across the central and peripheral papermaking regions of Europe.
This book offers a survey of the constitution of the French memoir tradition, and explores in detail the works of four representative authors: Philippe de Commynes, Louise de Savoie, Philippe de Cheverny, and François de Bassompierre. Works of self-writing were usually printed under the title of “memoirs” and have been often considered a uniform genre. These early forms of self-writing were in fact highly heterogenous works at the crossroads of multiple genres, from the account book to the astrological diary. Their writing, printing, and circulation challenge modern notions of autobiographical genres: their authorship is often questionable and collective, and they tended to be compiled in large collections for political ends, without regard to the authors’ intention.
Civil War and the Emergence of a Transnational News Culture in France and the Netherlands, 1561-1598
This book explores the reception of foreign news in the late sixteenth century civil wars in France and the Netherlands. Using a large number of French and Dutch chronicles, Baars innovatively demonstrates that the wider public was well aware of events abroad, though mutual interest in the other conflict was far from constant. She sheds new light on the connections between the Dutch Revolt and French Wars of Religion: contemporaries were gradually more inclined to see these wars as part of an international struggle. Baars argues that these times of civil war made inhabitants of both countries more experienced in distinguishing rumour from reliable rapports, stimulating the emergence of a public of critical news consumers.
Volume Editor: Thom Gobbitt
In: Quaerendo

Abstract

Like many wealthy citizens in the Dutch Golden Age, the Amsterdam civil servant Jacob de Wilde collected coins, gems, and small sculptures from Antiquity. Much has already been written about these collections, but De Wilde’s book collection has been largely neglected. This article focuses on his library.

In: Quaerendo

Abstract

The article (developing a paper presented at 2010 SHARP international conference) investigates the ways grand Faust editions from the 1850s and 1870s make sense as equivocal cultural objects migrating within and beyond Germany. Scholars have focused on these imposing tomes to herald the play as expression of a nation-centred claim, with Faust as heroic myth. This interpretation relied on costly plates and external characteristics for principal evidence. This article instead draws attention to circulation, transformations and fuller readings of these items, combining first-hand research in many collections. On the one hand, it looks into the editorial versions as adjustable to different audiences and cultures, using editorial data, reception evidence, and image analysis. On the other, it shows how fuller readings of a tome, based on material, symbolic and archival evidence, tell two different stories. This study of a text’s print apparel and circulation, at odds with its significance as a national myth, has implications well beyond this singular work.

In: Quaerendo
Author: Cis van Heertum

Abstract

This article discusses the survival of Adriaen Koerbagh’s Bloemhof, a controversial work confidently claimed to be rare in bibliographies and in antiquarian booksellers’ catalogues. So far, more than 70 copies have been found worldwide, in libraries and in private collections. Contemporary annotations provide additional biographical information on Koerbagh’s arrest and imprisonment. The reception of Bloemhof in Dutch and—mainly—German bibliographies is also discussed in the article. An appendix with surviving copies has been added.

In: Quaerendo