Browse results

Restricted Access

Lost Knowledge

The Concept of Vanished Technologies and Other Human Histories

Series:

Benjamin B. Olshin

Lost Knowledge: The Concept of Vanished Technologies and Other Human Histories examines the idea of lost knowledge on a deep time scale — indeed, back to a period between myth and history. In particular, it investigates a peculiar idea found in a number of early texts: that there was knowledge of sophisticated technologies, with knowledge that became obscured over time or was destroyed with the civilization that had created it. The book presents critical studies of a series of early Chinese, Greek, and other texts that treat the idea of specific “lost” technologies, such as mechanical flight and the transmission of images. This study also examines why such ideas about a vanished “golden age” were so prevalent in so many cultures.
Restricted Access

Series:

Douglas R. Underwood

In (Re)using Ruins, Douglas Underwood presents a new account of the use and reuse of Roman urban public monuments in a crucial period of transition, A.D. 300-600. Commonly seen as a period of uniform decline for public building, especially in the western half of the Mediterranean, (Re)using Ruins shows a vibrant, yet variable, history for these structures.
Douglas Underwood establishes a broad catalogue of archaeological evidence (supplemented with epigraphic and literary testimony) for the construction, maintenance, abandonment and reuses of baths, aqueducts, theatres, amphitheatres and circuses in Italy, southern Gaul, Spain, and North Africa, demonstrating that the driving force behind the changes to public buildings was largely a combined shift in urban ideologies and euergetistic practices in Late Antique cities.
Restricted Access

Kontinuität und Wandel des Senatorenstandes im Zeitalter der Soldatenkaiser

Prosopographische Untersuchungen zu Zusammensetzung, Funktion und Bedeutung des amplissimus ordo zwischen 235-284 n. Chr.

Series:

Nikolas Hächler

In Kontinuität und Wandel des Senatorenstandes im Zeitalter der Soldatenkaiser untersucht Nikolas Hächler die Zusammensetzung, Funktion und Bedeutung des ordo senatorius zwischen 235-284 n. Chr., als das Imperium Romanum eine Reihe tiefgreifender Veränderungen durchlief.
Grundlage der vorliegenden Studie stellt eine prosopographische Zusammenstellung dar, in welcher Lebensläufe senatorischer Amtsträger ausgehend von aktuell bekannten Quellenzeugnissen rekonstruiert werden. Obschon militärische Spitzenfunktionen im Laufe des 3. Jhs. zusehends von Rittern anstelle von Senatoren ausgeübt wurden und der ordo amplissimus damit an Bedeutung verlor, stellt sich bei näherer Betrachtung tatsächlich heraus, dass ihm für den Erhalt des Römischen Reiches während der so genannten Reichskrise noch immer grundlegend stabilisierende Funktionen zukamen.

In Kontinuität und Wandel des Senatorenstandes im Zeitalter der Soldatenkaiser Nikolas Hächler observes the composition, function and general importance of the ordo senatorius during 235-284 C.E. when the Roman Empire was affected by a series of radical changes. The study is grounded on a prosopographical analysis, in which Hächler presents a reconstruction of senatorial cursus based on the currently known source material. Although the most important functions within the Roman army were gradually filled by members of the ordo equester instead of viri clarissimi and the senatorial order thereby suffered a loss of importance during the 3rd century, it remained of utmost significance for the stability of the Imperium Romanum in times of crisis.
Open Access

Series:

Edited by Stéphane Martin

In recent years, storage has come to the fore as a central aspect of ancient economies. However studies have hitherto focused on urban and military storage. Although archaeological excavations of rural granaries are numerous, their evidence has yet to be fully taken into account. Such is the ambition of Rural Granaries in Northern Gaul (Sixth Century BCE – Fourth Century CE). Focusing on northern Gaul, this volume starts by discussing at length the possibility of quantifying storage capacities and, through them, agrarian production. Building on this first part, the second half of the book sketches the evolution of rural storage in Gaul from the Iron Age to Late Antiquity, setting firmly archaeological evidence in the historical context of the Roman Empire.
Restricted Access

Series:

Hamish Cameron

In Making Mesopotamia: Geography and Empire in a Romano-Iranian Borderland, Hamish Cameron examines the representation of the Mesopotamian Borderland in the geographical writing of Strabo, Pliny the Elder, Claudius Ptolemy, the anonymous Expositio Totius Mundi, and Ammianus Marcellinus. This inter-imperial borderland between the Roman Empire and the Arsacid and Sasanid Empires provided fertile ground for Roman geographical writers to articulate their ideas about space, boundaries, and imperial power. By examining these geographical descriptions, Hamish Cameron shows how each author constructed an image of Mesopotamia in keeping with the goals and context of their own work, while collectively creating a vision of Mesopotamia as a borderland space of movement, inter-imperial tension, and global engagement.
Restricted Access

Galen’s Theory of Black Bile

Hippocratic Tradition, Manipulation, Innovation

Series:

Keith Andrew Stewart

In Galen’s Theory of Black Bile: Hippocratic Tradition, Manipulation, Innovation Keith Stewart investigates Galen’s writing on black bile to explain health and disease and shows that Galen sometimes presented this humour as three substances with different properties that can either be harmful or beneficial to the body. Keith Stewart analyses the most important treatises for Galen’s physical description and characteristion of black bile and challenges certain views on the development of this humour, such as the importance of the content of the Hippocratic On the Nature of Man. This analysis allows us to understand how and why Galen defines and uses black bile in different ways for his arguments that cannot always be reconciled with the content of his sources.
Restricted Access

Series:

Laela Zwollo

In Augustine and Plotinus: the human mind as image of the divine Laela Zwollo provides an inside view of two of the most influential thinkers of late antiquity: the Christian Augustine and the Neo-Platonist Plotinus. By exploring the finer points and paradoxes of their doctrines of the image of God (the human soul/intellect), the illustrious church father’s complex interaction with his most important non-biblical source comes into focus. In order to fathom Augustine, we should first grasp the beauty in Plotinus’ philosophy and its attractiveness to Christians. This monograph will contribute to a better understanding of the formative years of Christianity as well as later ancient philosophy. It can serve as a handbook for becoming acquainted with the two thinkers, as well as for delving into the profundity of their thought.
Restricted Access

Roman Turdetania

Romanization, Identity and Socio-Cultural Interaction in the South of the Iberian Peninsula between the 4th and 1st centuries BCE

Series:

Edited by Gonzalo Cruz Andreotti

Roman Turdetania makes use of the literary and archeological sources to provide an updated state of knowledge from a postcolonial approach about the socio-cultural interaction processes and the subsequent romanisation of the populations in the southern Iberian Peninsula from the 4th to the 1st centuries BCE. The resulting communities shaped a new identity, hybrid and converging, resulting from the previous Phoenician–Punic substrate vigorously coexisting with the new Hellenistic-Roman imprint.
Restricted Access

Series:

Edited by Renaud Gagné, Simon Goldhill and Geoffrey Lloyd

Historically, all societies have used comparison to analyze cultural difference through the interaction of religion, power, and translation. When comparison is a self-reflective practice, it can be seen as a form of comparatism. Many scholars are concerned in one way or another with the practice and methods of comparison, and the need for a cognitively robust relativism is an integral part of a mature historical self-placement. This volume looks at how different theories and practices of writing and interpretation have developed at different times in different cultures and reconsiders the specificities of modern comparative approaches within a variety of comparative moments. The idea is to reconsider the specificities, the obstacles, and the possibilities of modern comparative approaches in history and anthropology through a variety of earlier and parallel comparative horizons. Particular attention is given to the exceptional role of Athens and Jerusalem in shaping the Western understanding of cultural difference.
Restricted Access

Series:

Barry O’Halloran

Recently there has been a welcome revival of scholarly interest in the economy of classical Greece. In the face of increasingly compelling arguments for the existence of a market economy in classical Athens, the Finleyan orthodoxy is finally relinquishing its long dominion. In this book, Barry O’Halloran seeks to contribute to this renewed debate by re-interrogating the ancient evidence using more recent economic interpretative frameworks. The aim is to re-evaluate accepted orthodoxies and present the economic history of this emblematic city-state in a new light. More specifically, it analyses the economic foundations of Athens through the prism of its navy. Its macroeconomic approach utilises an employment-demand model through which enormous naval defence expenditures created an exceptional period of demand-led economic growth.