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In The Lyon Terence Giulia Torello-Hill and Andrew J. Turner take an unprecedented interdisciplinary approach to map out the influence of Late-Antique and Medieval commentary and iconographic traditions over this seminal edition of the plays of Terence, published in Lyon in 1493, and examine its legacy. The work had a profound impact on the way Terence’s plays were read and understood throughout the sixteenth century, but its influence has been poorly recognised in modern scholarship. The authors establish the pivotal role that this book, and its editor Badius, played in the revitalisation of the theoretical understanding of Classical comedy and in the revival of the plays of Terence that foreshadowed the establishment of early modern theatre in Italy and France.
Winner of the 2018 Josef IJsewijn Prize for Best Book on a Neo-Latin Topic

Although many humanists, from Petrarch to Fulvio Orsini, had written briefly about library history, the De bibliothecis of Justus Lipsius was the first self-contained monograph on the topic. The De bibliothecis proved to be a seminal achievement, both in redefining the scope of library history and in articulating a vision of a public, secular, research institution for the humanities. It was repeatedly reprinted and translated, plagiarized and epitomized. Through the end of the nineteenth century, scholars turned to it as the ultimate foundation for any discussion of library history. In Ancient Libraries and Renaissance Humanism, Hendrickson presents a critical edition of Lipsius’s work with introductory studies, a Latin text, English translation, and a substantial historical commentary.
Terence between Late Antiquity and the Age of Printing investigates the Medieval and Early Renaissance reception of Terence in highly innovative ways, combining the diverse but interrelated strands of textual criticism, illustrative tradition, and performance. The plays of Terence seem to have remained unperformed until the Renaissance, but they were a central text for educators in Western Europe. Manuscripts of the plays contained scholarship and illustrations which were initially inspired by Late Antique models, and which were constantly transformed in response to contemporary thought. The contributions in this work deal with these topics, as well as the earliest printed editions of Terence, theatrical revivals in Northern Italy, and the readership of Terence throughout the Early Middle Ages.
In: Terence between Late Antiquity and the Age of Printing
In: Terence between Late Antiquity and the Age of Printing
In: Terence between Late Antiquity and the Age of Printing
In: Terence between Late Antiquity and the Age of Printing
In: Terence between Late Antiquity and the Age of Printing
In: Terence between Late Antiquity and the Age of Printing