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In Articulating the Ḥijāba, Mariam Rosser-Owen analyses for the first time the artistic and cultural patronage of the ‘Amirid regents of the last Cordoban Umayyad caliph, Hisham II, a period rarely covered in the historiography of al-Andalus. Al-Mansur, the founder of this dynasty, is usually considered a usurper of caliphal authority, who pursued military victory at the expense of the transcendental achievements of the first two caliphs. But he also commissioned a vast extension to the Great Mosque of Cordoba, founded a palatine city, conducted skilled diplomatic relations, patronised a circle of court poets, and owned some of the most spectacular objects to survive from al-Andalus, in ivory and marble. This study presents the evidence for a reconsideration of this period.
Editor: Mike Humphreys
Few subjects have generated more argument in early medieval, Byzantine, and Orthodox history than Iconoclasm. Supposedly for more than a century the Orthodox Church and Byzantium were wracked by controversy over religious figural imagery, culminating in 843 with the establishment of icon veneration as a fundamental Orthodox practice. In this multidisciplinary Companion to Byzantine Iconoclasm, twelve contributors set the controversy in context and critically examine the key debates: what was the argument about? How much destruction and persecution was there? What caused and fuelled the controversy? What links, if any, were there to events in the Islamic Caliphate and the Latin West? And how can we use our contested literary and material sources to offer answers to these questions?
Author: Irene Binini
This book offers a major reassessment of Peter Abelard’s modal logic and theory of modalities, presenting them as far more uniform and consistent than was until now recognized. Binini offers find new ways of connecting Abelard’s modal views with other parts of his logic, semantics, metaphysics and theology.
Further, the work also provides a comprehensive study of the logical context in which Abelard’s theories originated and developed, by presenting fresh evidence about many 11th and 12th-century sources that are still unpublished. This analysis sheds new light on the relations between Abelard and ancient authors such as Aristotle, Boethius, and Priscian, as well as between Abelard and his contemporaries, such as Anselm of Canterbury, William of Champeaux, Joscelin of Soissons, and Alberic of Paris.
This book presents a collective portrait of the inhabitants of Árpádian- and Angevin-era Hungary identified by their countrymen as Rutheni. Many members of this group hailed from the lands of Halych, Chernihiv, Kyiv, and Volhynia, and migrated to Hungary under the pressure of circumstances, eventually carving out for themselves a position of prominence in the kingdom's social hierarchy and political affairs.

Drawing on a range of sources, this is the first work to make extensive use of Latin-language documents to throw light on the vicissitudes of the life of Rus’ settlers and those bearing Rus’-related names or bynames in medieval Central Europe, revealing their important role in contemporary social and political life.
Reason and Desire in the Monastic Theology of Anselm of Canterbury
Author: John Bayer
Interpretations of Anselm’s Proslogion range between the extremes of ‘rationalism’ and ‘fideism’ because of the challenge of unifying its philosophical and devotional aspects. In this book, Bayer argues that a ‘monastic interpretation’ – or an interpretation that takes seriously the intellectual significance of our existential commitments – offers a powerful compromise.

Through an extensive study of Anselm’s spiritualty, especially as it is manifested in his letters and homiletic works, coupled with a profound study of Anselm’s philosophy of language in the De grammatico and Monologion, Bayer aims to reveal the Anselmian unity of life and thought, and thereby also the harmony between faith and reason. In this way, he defends the Proslogion as a unified and probative argument.