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This multi-disciplinary volume shows Istanbul, capital of the vast polyglot, multiethnic, and multireligious Ottoman empire and home to one of the world’s largest and most diverse urban populations, as an early modern metropolis. It is the first collective effort to reflect the wealth of recent scholarship on early modern Istanbul , embracing novel subjects and questions, and fresh approaches to older debates.

Assembling topics seldom treated together, and crisscrossing the socioeconomic, political, cultural, environmental, and spatial, it examines the myriad human and non-human actors, local and global, that shaped the city into one of the key sites of early modern urbanity.

Contributors are: Oscar Aguirre-Mandujano , Zeynep Altok, Walter G. Andrews, Betül Başaran, Cem Behar, Maurits H. van den Boogert, John J. Curry, Linda T. Darling, Suraiya Faroqhi, Emine Fetvacı, Shirine Hamadeh, Cemal Kafadar, Çiğdem Kafescioğlu, Deniz Karakaş, Leyla Kayhan Elbirlik, B. Harun Küçük, Selim S. Kuru, Karen A. Leal, Gülru Necipoğlu, Christoph K. Neumann, Aslı Niyazioğlu, Amanda Phillips, Marinos Sariyannis, Aleksandar Shopov, Lucienne Thys-Şenocak, Nükhet Varlık, N. Zeynep Yelçe, Gülay Yılmaz, and Zeynep Yürekli.
Author: Sigrun Haude
At its core, Coping with Life during the Thirty Years’ War (1618–1648) explores how people tried to survive the Thirty Years’ War, on what resources they drew, and how they attempted to make sense of it. A rich tapestry of stories brings to light contemporaries’ trauma as well as women and men’s unrelenting initiatives to stem the war’s negative consequences. Through these close-ups, Sigrun Haude shows that experiences during the Thirty Years’ War were much more diverse and often more perplexing than a straightforward story line of violence and destruction can capture. Life during the Thirty Years’ War was not a homogenous vale of gloom and doom, but a multifaceted story that was often heartbreaking, yet, at times, also uplifting.
This book reconfigures the study of the origins of the Enlightenment in the Spanish Empire. Challenging dominant interpretations of the period, this book shows that early eighteenth-century Spanish authors turned to Enlightenment ideas to reinvent Spain’s role in the European balance of power. And while international law grew to provide a legal framework that could safeguard peace, Spanish officials, diplomats, and authors, hardened by the failure of Spanish diplomacy, sought instead to regulate international relations by drawing on investment, profit, and self-interest. The book shows, on the basis of new archival research, that the Diplomatic Enlightenment sought to turn the Spanish Empire into a space for closer political cooperation with other European and non-European states and empires.
Étienne Pasquier (1529–1615) was a lawyer, royal official, man of letters, and historian. He represented the University of Paris in its 1565 suit to dislodge a Jesuit school from Paris. Despite royal support, the Jesuits remained in conflict with many institutions, which in 1595 expelled them from much of the realm. With ever-increasing polemics, Pasquier continued to oppose the Jesuits. To further his aims, he published a dialog between a Jesuit (almost certainly Louis Richeome) and a lawyer (Pasquier himself). He called it the Jesuits’ Catechism (1602). Pasquier’s work did not stop the French king from welcoming the Jesuits back. But Pasquier’s Catechism remained central to Jansenist and other anti-Jesuit agitation up to the Society’s 1773 suppression and beyond.
In the early modern period, images of revolts and violence became increasingly important tools to legitimize or contest political structures. This volume offers the first in-depth analysis of how early modern people produced and consumed violent imagery and assesses its role in memory practices, political mobilization, and the negotiation of cruelty and justice.

Critically evaluating the traditional focus on Western European imagery, the case studies in this book draw on evidence from Russia, China, Hungary, Portugal, Germany, North America and other regions. The contributors to this volume highlight the distinctions between visual cultures of violence, as well as their entanglements in a period of intensive transregional communication, early globalization and European colonization.

Contributors include: Monika Barget, David de Boer, Nóra G. Etényi, Fabian Fechner, Joana Fraga, Malte Griesse, Alain Hugon, Gleb Kazakov, Nancy Kollmann, Ya-Chen Ma, Galina Tirnanic, and Ramon Voges.