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From Mythos to Logos

Andrea Palladio, Freemasonry, and the Triumph of Minerva

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Edited by Michael Trevor Coughlin

In his new book From Mythos to Logos : Andrea Palladio, Freemasonry and the Triumph of Minerva, Michael Trevor Coughlin provides an interpretive lens to explore how myth was used to encode sixteenth-century, Italian works of architecture and their frescoed interiors with Logos – providing powerful insights that promote a way of being in a world in which peace and freedom are the greatest hallmarks of society. Leaning heavily on the intersection between myth and philosophy, Coughlin convincingly argues Freemasonry began in the Italian city of Vicenza in 1546, offering fresh insight into the origin of Freemasonry, one of the most powerful and longstanding organizations in the world – one in the midst of a popularity and membership boom that is unprecedented.
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Edited by Pamela M. Jones, Barbara Wisch and Simon Ditchfield

This volume, edited by Pamela M. Jones, Barbara Wisch, and Simon Ditchfield, focuses on Rome from 1492-1692, an era of striking renewal: demographic, architectural, intellectual, and artistic. Rome’s most distinctive aspects--including its twin governments (civic and papal), unique role as the seat of global Catholicism, disproportionately male population, and status as artistic capital of Europe--are examined from numerous perspectives. This book of 30 chapters, intended for scholars and students across the academy, fills a noteworthy gap in the literature. It is the only multidisciplinary study of 16th- and 17th-century Rome that synthesizes and critiques past and recent scholarship while offering innovative analyses of a wide range of topics and identifying new avenues for research.

Contributors are: Renata Ago, Elisa Andretta, Katherine Aron-Beller, Lisa Beaven, Eleonora Canepari, Christopher Carlsmith, Patrizia Cavazzini, Elizabeth S. Cohen, Thomas V. Cohen, Jeffrey Collins, Simon Ditchfield, Anna Esposito, Federica Favino, Daniele V. Filippi, Irene Fosi, Kenneth Gouwens, Giuseppe Antonio Guazzelli, John M. Hunt, Pamela M. Jones, Carla Keyvanian, Margaret A. Kuntz, Stephanie C. Leone, Evelyn Lincoln, Jessica Maier, Laurie Nussdorfer, Toby Osborne, Miles Pattenden, Denis Ribouillault, Katherine W. Rinne, Minou Schraven, John Beldon Scott, Barbara Wisch, Arnold A. Witte.
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Das Auge der Geschichte

Der Aufstand der Niederlande und die Französischen Religionskriege im Spiegel der Bildberichte Franz Hogenbergs (ca. 1560–1610)

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Ramon Voges

english

Perceptions of the Dutch Revolt continue to this day to be shaped by Frans Hogenberg's visual reports on its events. In his book Das Auge der Geschichte, Ramon Voges offers for the first time a comprehensive historical analysis of these prints. By examining the broadsheets not as reflections of past events, but as a form of complex visual historiography, he approaches the well-known depictions made at the Hogenberg workshop in Cologne from a new point of view.

His study provides insights into how the visual reports tell the story of great European conflicts in the age of the Wars of Religion. The book not only contributes to the history of historiography, it also reveals how Hogenberg’s prints participated in conflicts about power, faith, and violence.--


deutsch

Die Bildberichte Franz Hogenbergs prägen bis heute die Vorstellungen vom Aufstand der Niederlande. In seinem Buch Das Auge der Geschichte macht Ramon Voges die Druckgraphiken erstmals zum Gegenstand einer umfassenden historischen Untersuchung. Indem er die Blätter nicht als Abbilder eines früheren Geschehens, sondern als vielschichtige Form einer Geschichtsschreibung in Bildern analysiert, wirft er einen neuen Blick auf die vertrauten Darstellungen aus Hogenbergs Kölner Werkstatt.

Seine Studie gibt darüber Aufschluss, wie die Bildberichte die Geschichte der europäischen Großkonflikte im Zeitalter der Religionskriege erzählen. Sie leistet damit nicht nur einen Beitrag zur Geschichte der Geschichtsschreibung. Sie legt auch offen, wie Hogenbergs Druckgraphiken in die Auseinandersetzungen um Glauben, Herrschaft und Gewalt eingegriffen haben.
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Beyond Chinoiserie

Artistic Exchange between China and the West during the Late Qing Dynasty (1796-1911)

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Edited by Petra ten-Doesschate Chu and Jennifer Milam

The complex interweaving of different Western visions of China had a profound impact on artistic exchange between China and the West during the nineteenth century. Beyond Chinoiserie addresses the complexity of this exchange. While the playful Western “vision of Cathay” formed in the previous century continued to thrive, a more realistic vision of China was increasingly formed through travel accounts, paintings, watercolors, prints, book illustrations, and photographs. Simultaneously, the new discipline of sinology led to a deepening of the understanding of Chinese cultural history. Leading and emerging scholars in the fields of art history, literary studies and material culture, have authored the ten essays in this book, which deal with artistic relations between China and the West at a time when Western powers’ attempts to extend a sphere of influence in China led to increasingly hostile political interactions.
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Kathleen G. Chapman

In Expressionism and Poster Design in Germany 1905-1925, Kathleen Chapman re-defines Expressionism by situating it in relation to the most common type of picture in public space during the Wilhelmine twentieth century, the commercial poster. Focusing equally on visual material and contemporaneous debates surrounding art, posters, and the image in general, this study reveals that conceptions of a “modern” image were characterized not so much by style or mode of production and distribution, but by a visual rhetoric designed to communicate more directly than words. As instances of such rhetoric, Expressionist art and posters emerge as equally significant examples of this modern image, demonstrating the interconnectedness of the aesthetic, the utilitarian, and the commercial in European modernism.
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Edited by Hilaire Kallendorf

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Stephanie L. Fink

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In Renaissance Spain, childbirth was the moment where the promise of life contended with the certainty of ultimate death. Birth and the immediate post-partum period, where midwives mediated the transit between liminal spaces for mother and child, viscerally highlighted the precariousness and even capriciousness of the transition from life to death. In a period that witnessed rapid population shifts in urban centers, the pressures of poverty or shame resulted in newborns abandoned to the care of foundling hospitals. These institutions offered little protection against infant mortality, but at least attended to baptism and burial for foundlings to ensure the safe passage of the soul. Attitudes and practices surrounding the critical moments that magnify the intersections between life and death demonstrate how religiosity and socioeconomic reality fused to produce an understanding of birth that mirrored attitudes toward death. Birth, as with death, constituted a site of liminality revealed in the ways Spaniards wove together the material and the spiritual, the profane and the sacred, to contend with the realities of this world and expectations surrounding the world of the spirit.

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Enrique García Santo-Tomás

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Recent work by José Manuel Nieto Soria, María José del Río Barredo, Carmen Sanz Ayán, and Teófilo Ruiz has successfully connected pivotal aspects of religious rituals and urban dynamics in the depiction of Early Modern Iberian metropolises like Madrid and Seville. This essay builds on these historical approaches, offering a perspective that also proposes the incorporation of key components of Baroque metropolitan culture, both central and liminal—or even marginal. The former would include religious and secular theater, along with other forms of visual display like pageants and banquets; the latter would call for a renewed attention to practices like gambling and smoking, all celebrated in fictional accounts which capture the anxieties of a society in moral and financial decline.

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Ruth MacKay

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The daily and political lives of Castilians in villages, towns, and cities were embedded in a shared understanding of the common good, el bien común, which was based on law, custom, tradition, and history. Castilians’ claims, uttered in fiscal negotiations with higher authorities, town meetings, competition for rights and privileges with neighboring towns, and both policing and caring for their fellow inhabitants, emerged from convictions and practices that were consistent with a political theory of the republic that was both widespread and useful. This essay examines four frameworks in which this notion of community was enacted: citizenship, memory, Christian solidarity, and vassalage.

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Edited by Hilaire Kallendorf