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Author: Ian Maclean
In Episodes in the Life of the Early Modern Learned Book, Ian Maclean investigates intellectual life through the prism of the history of publishing, academic institutions, journals, and the German book fairs whose evolution is mapped over the long seventeenth century. After a study of the activities of Italian book merchants up to 1621, the passage into print, both locally and internationally, of English and Italian medicine and ‘new’ science comes under scrutiny. The fate of humanist publishing is next illustrated in the figure of the Dutch merchant Andreas Frisius (1630-1675). The work ends with an analysis of the two monuments of the last phase of legal humanism: the Thesauruses of Otto (1725-44) and Gerard Meerman (1751-80).
The wide scholarly interests of Scots in the Restoration period are analysed by Murray Simpson through this in-depth study of the library of James Nairn (1629-1678), a Scottish parish minister. The collection demonstrates a remarkable receptivity to new intellectual ideas. At some two thousand titles Nairn’s is the biggest library formed in this period for which we have detailed and accurate records. The collection is analysed by subject. In addition, there is a biographical study and chapters investigating aspects of the Scottish book market and comparing other contemporary Scottish clerical libraries. A short-title catalogue of the collection, giving references to relevant online bibliographies and catalogues, a select provenance index and a subject index complete the work.
Author: Robert Jones
From the first Arabic grammar printed at Granada in 1505 to the Arabic editions of the Dutch scholar Thomas Erpenius (d.1624), some audacious scholars - supported by powerful patrons and inspired by several of the greatest minds of the Renaissance – introduced, for the first time, the study of Arabic language and letters to centres of learning across Europe. These pioneers formed collections of Arabic manuscripts, met Arabic-speaking visitors, studied and adapted the Islamic grammatical tradition, and printed editions of Arabic texts - most strikingly in the magnificent books published by the Medici Oriental Press at Rome in the 1590s. Robert Jones’ findings in the libraries of Florence, Leiden, Paris and Vienna, and his contribution to the history of grammar, are of enduring importance.
In: Learning Arabic in Renaissance Europe (1505-1624)
In: Learning Arabic in Renaissance Europe (1505-1624)
In: Learning Arabic in Renaissance Europe (1505-1624)
In: Learning Arabic in Renaissance Europe (1505-1624)
In: Learning Arabic in Renaissance Europe (1505-1624)
In: Learning Arabic in Renaissance Europe (1505-1624)