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Economic Thought and Practice in Early China
To date, ancient Chinese economic thought has never been related to the evidence of economic practice. We know how state economies were supposed to be run in theory, but not in how far economic thought reflected everyday economic action. Moreover, it is still not clear to what extent economic thought formed a separate field of inquiry, to what extent it was independent of certain fundamental cultural notions or overarching political considerations. Finally, why was there so much more of a sustained interest in political economy than anywhere else? These are the questions that this book sets out to consider through analyses of both received and newly excavated sources on economic thought and practice, placing these in their specific historical contexts.

Contributors are Paul R. Goldin, Yohei Kakinuma, Maxim Korolkov, Elisa Levi Sabattini, Andrew Meyer, Yuri Pines, Christian Schwermann, Hans van Ess, and Robin D.S. Yates
This volume offers new insight into key developments in the history of protection for patent rights during the period 1791-1883. The author, Dr Louise J. Duncan, presents a detailed examination of the underlying theoretical bases advanced for the protection of patents in various key European countries, and including new material focusing on the political rhetoric of protagonists and opponents of the patent system during the course of the patent abolitionist debates of the 1860s and 1870s. Finally, the book examines in detail the factors which prompted the movement towards international protection of patents, culminating in the Paris Convention for the Protection of Industrial Property of 1883.
Editors: Ebru Boyar and Kate Fleet
Centred on the socio-economic life of Ottoman Anatolia, this volume examines aspects of production, local and international trade, consumption and the role of the state, both at a local and a central level. Based on a wide array of data and adopting a variety of approaches, chapters range from the macro to the micro, from the overview of Anatolian economic resources to the in-depth examination of the petition language of provincial economic actors. Making a Living in Ottoman Anatolia thus offers the reader an entrée into the rich and varied socio-economic life of a central region of the Ottoman empire.

Contributors are Marc Aymes, Ebru Boyar, Metin Coşgel, Suraiya Faroqhi, Kate Fleet, Elena Frangakis-Syrett, Yonca Köksal, Mehmet Öz, Mehmet Polatel and Sadullah Yıldırım.
Author: David Challis
Foreign Currency Volatility and the Market for French Modernist Art examines how the collapse of the French franc in the decades following the First World War activated powerful ‘push’ and ‘pull’ economic forces that compelled French art collectors to monetise their collections while simultaneously elevating the purchasing power of international art collectors. These factors are shown to have played a significant, and previously under-recognised role, in the large-scale translocation of French modernist art that radically accelerated its commercial and critical reception across the globe and positioned it at the apex of the newly established hierarchy of modern art.
The Law of Accumulation and Breakdown, of the Capitalist System, Being also a Theory of Crises
Author: Henryk Grossman
Editor: Rick Kuhn
Translator: Jairus Banaji
Long awaited, the first full translation of Henryk Grossman’s The Law of Accumulation and Breakdown, of the Capitalist System, Being also a Theory of Crisis has been published in English. Grossman was the preeminent Marxist economist of the 20th century; The Law of Accumulation was the most important, influential and yet denounced of his works. It recovers not only Marx’s primary explanation of capitalism’s economic crises and breakdown tendency but also his method in Capital.
Author: Renard Gluzman
Drawing from a broad range of hitherto unpublished archival material and the reconstructed biographies of hundreds of San Marco ships, this book provides a critical overview of the Republic’s shipping activities contemporary with the major geographical discoveries of the period, the ascendency of the Ottoman Empire in the Mediterranean, and the on-going struggle among the major European powers for political and economic hegemony. Within this complex framework, the agency of environmental factors receives equal importance beside geopolitics and economic interests, challenging the accepted hierarchy of the factors impacting the maritime history of Venice.
Merchants and Missionaries in 16th and 17th Century Japan
Author: Mihoko Oka
This book attempts to depict certain aspects of the Portuguese trade in East Asia in the 16th and 17th centuries by analyzing the activities of the merchants and Christian missionaries involved. It also discusses the response of the Japanese regime in handling the systemic changes that took place in the Asian seas. Consequently, it explains how Jesuit missionaries forged close ties with local merchants from the start of their activities in East Asian waters, and there is no doubt that the propagation of Christianity in Japan was a result of their cooperation. The author of this book attempted to combine the essence of previous studies by Japanese and western scholars and added several new findings from analyses of original Japanese and European language documents.
A Study of 11th to 13th Century Tangut Records
Author: Jinbo Shi
Editor / Translator: Hansong Li
Prices, Markets and Industrialization in the Netherlands, 1800-1913
Author: Arthur van Riel
For over a century now, historians have debated the causes of the lagged industrialization of the Dutch economy during the nineteenth century. To this debate, Trials of Convergence brings the analytical perspective of prices, factor costs and the functioning of markets. Its critical insight is that only an approach based on the integrated incentive structure of the economy allows us to delimit the role of alternative explanations. Using statistical reconstruction and microdata, it shows that the retarded transition resulted from a confluence of forces. These ranged from open economy effects and natural endowments to the resilient influence of the institutions of the former Dutch Republic and the fiscal policy adopted in response to Belgian secession. At the height of the British Industrial Revolution the Dutch economy slowed, triggering a return to the problems of eighteenth-century stagnation. All this meant that the transition to 'modern economic growth' after 1860 came about only in a changed international context and after a period of politico-economic reform.