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Edited by Pamela M. Jones, Barbara Wisch and Simon Ditchfield

This volume, edited by Pamela M. Jones, Barbara Wisch, and Simon Ditchfield, focuses on Rome from 1492-1692, an era of striking renewal: demographic, architectural, intellectual, and artistic. Rome’s most distinctive aspects--including its twin governments (civic and papal), unique role as the seat of global Catholicism, disproportionately male population, and status as artistic capital of Europe--are examined from numerous perspectives. This book of 30 chapters, intended for scholars and students across the academy, fills a noteworthy gap in the literature. It is the only multidisciplinary study of 16th- and 17th-century Rome that synthesizes and critiques past and recent scholarship while offering innovative analyses of a wide range of topics and identifying new avenues for research.

Contributors are: Renata Ago, Elisa Andretta, Katherine Aron-Beller, Lisa Beaven, Eleonora Canepari, Christopher Carlsmith, Patrizia Cavazzini, Elizabeth S. Cohen, Thomas V. Cohen, Jeffrey Collins, Simon Ditchfield, Anna Esposito, Federica Favino, Daniele V. Filippi, Irene Fosi, Kenneth Gouwens, Giuseppe Antonio Guazzelli, John M. Hunt, Pamela M. Jones, Carla Keyvanian, Margaret A. Kuntz, Stephanie C. Leone, Evelyn Lincoln, Jessica Maier, Laurie Nussdorfer, Toby Osborne, Miles Pattenden, Denis Ribouillault, Katherine W. Rinne, Minou Schraven, John Beldon Scott, Barbara Wisch, Arnold A. Witte.
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Andrea Pearson

In Gardens of Love and the Limits of Morality in Early Netherlandish Art, Andrea Pearson charts the moralization of human bodies in late medieval and early modern visual culture, through paintings by Jan van Eyck and Hieronymus Bosch, devotional prints and illustrated books, and the celebrated enclosed gardens of Mechelen among other works.
Drawing on new archival evidence and innovative visual analysis to reframe familiar religious discourses, she demonstrates that depicted topographies advanced and sometimes resisted bodily critiques expressed in scripture, conduct literature, and even legislation. Governing many of these redemptive greenscapes were the figures of Christ and the Virgin Mary, archetypes of purity whose spiritual authority was impossible to ignore, yet whose mysteries posed innumerable moral challenges. The study reveals that bodily status was the fundamental problem of human salvation, in which artists, patrons, and viewers alike had an interpretive stake.
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Das Auge der Geschichte

Der Aufstand der Niederlande und die Französischen Religionskriege im Spiegel der Bildberichte Franz Hogenbergs (ca. 1560–1610)

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Ramon Voges

english

Perceptions of the Dutch Revolt continue to this day to be shaped by Frans Hogenberg's visual reports on its events. In his book Das Auge der Geschichte, Ramon Voges offers for the first time a comprehensive historical analysis of these prints. By examining the broadsheets not as reflections of past events, but as a form of complex visual historiography, he approaches the well-known depictions made at the Hogenberg workshop in Cologne from a new point of view.

His study provides insights into how the visual reports tell the story of great European conflicts in the age of the Wars of Religion. The book not only contributes to the history of historiography, it also reveals how Hogenberg’s prints participated in conflicts about power, faith, and violence.--


deutsch

Die Bildberichte Franz Hogenbergs prägen bis heute die Vorstellungen vom Aufstand der Niederlande. In seinem Buch Das Auge der Geschichte macht Ramon Voges die Druckgraphiken erstmals zum Gegenstand einer umfassenden historischen Untersuchung. Indem er die Blätter nicht als Abbilder eines früheren Geschehens, sondern als vielschichtige Form einer Geschichtsschreibung in Bildern analysiert, wirft er einen neuen Blick auf die vertrauten Darstellungen aus Hogenbergs Kölner Werkstatt.

Seine Studie gibt darüber Aufschluss, wie die Bildberichte die Geschichte der europäischen Großkonflikte im Zeitalter der Religionskriege erzählen. Sie leistet damit nicht nur einen Beitrag zur Geschichte der Geschichtsschreibung. Sie legt auch offen, wie Hogenbergs Druckgraphiken in die Auseinandersetzungen um Glauben, Herrschaft und Gewalt eingegriffen haben.
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Edited by Konrad Eisenbichler

After the State and the Church, the most well organized membership system of medieval and early modern Europe was the confraternity. In cities, towns, and villages it would have been difficult for someone not to be a member of a confraternity, the recipient of its charity, or aware of its presence in the community. In A Companion to Medieval and Early Modern Confraternities, Konrad Eisenbichler brings together an international group of scholars to examine confraternities from various perspectives: their origins and development, their devotional practices, their charitable activities, and their contributions to literature, music, and art. The result is a picture of confraternities as important venues for the acquisition of spiritual riches, material wealth, and social capital. Contributors include: Alyssa Abraham, Davide Adamoli, Christopher F. Black, Dominika Burdzy , David D’Andrea, Konrad Eisenbichler, Anna Esposito, Federica Francesconi, Marina Gazzini, Jonathan Glixon, Colm Lennon, William R. Levin, Murdo J. MacLeod, Nerida Newbigin, Dylan Reid, Gervase Rosser, Nicholas Terpstra, Paul Trio, Anne-Laure Van Bruaene, Beata Wojciechowska, and Danilo Zardin.
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Edited by Laura Whatley

A Companion to Seals in the Middle Ages is a cross-disciplinary collection of fourteen essays on medieval sigillography. It is organized thematically, and it emphasizes important, often cutting-edge, methodologies for the study of medieval seals and sealing cultures.
As the chronological, temporal and geographic scope of the essays in the volume suggests, the study of the medieval seal—its manufacture, materiality, usage, iconography, inscription, and preservation—is a rich endeavour that demands collaboration across disciplines as well as between scholars working on material from different regions and periods. It is hoped that this collection will make the study of medieval seals more accessible and will stimulate students and scholars to employ and further develop these material and methodological approaches to seals.
Contributors are Adrian Ailes, Elka Cwiertnia, Paul Dryburgh, Emir O. Filipovi, Oliver Harris, Philippa Hoskin, Ashley Jones, Andreas Lehnertz, John McEwan, Elizabeth A. New, Jonathan Shea, Caroline Simonet, Angelina A. Volkoff, and Marek L. Wójcik.
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Edited by Hilaire Kallendorf

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Stephanie L. Fink

Abstract

In Renaissance Spain, childbirth was the moment where the promise of life contended with the certainty of ultimate death. Birth and the immediate post-partum period, where midwives mediated the transit between liminal spaces for mother and child, viscerally highlighted the precariousness and even capriciousness of the transition from life to death. In a period that witnessed rapid population shifts in urban centers, the pressures of poverty or shame resulted in newborns abandoned to the care of foundling hospitals. These institutions offered little protection against infant mortality, but at least attended to baptism and burial for foundlings to ensure the safe passage of the soul. Attitudes and practices surrounding the critical moments that magnify the intersections between life and death demonstrate how religiosity and socioeconomic reality fused to produce an understanding of birth that mirrored attitudes toward death. Birth, as with death, constituted a site of liminality revealed in the ways Spaniards wove together the material and the spiritual, the profane and the sacred, to contend with the realities of this world and expectations surrounding the world of the spirit.

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Enrique García Santo-Tomás

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Recent work by José Manuel Nieto Soria, María José del Río Barredo, Carmen Sanz Ayán, and Teófilo Ruiz has successfully connected pivotal aspects of religious rituals and urban dynamics in the depiction of Early Modern Iberian metropolises like Madrid and Seville. This essay builds on these historical approaches, offering a perspective that also proposes the incorporation of key components of Baroque metropolitan culture, both central and liminal—or even marginal. The former would include religious and secular theater, along with other forms of visual display like pageants and banquets; the latter would call for a renewed attention to practices like gambling and smoking, all celebrated in fictional accounts which capture the anxieties of a society in moral and financial decline.

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Ruth MacKay

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The daily and political lives of Castilians in villages, towns, and cities were embedded in a shared understanding of the common good, el bien común, which was based on law, custom, tradition, and history. Castilians’ claims, uttered in fiscal negotiations with higher authorities, town meetings, competition for rights and privileges with neighboring towns, and both policing and caring for their fellow inhabitants, emerged from convictions and practices that were consistent with a political theory of the republic that was both widespread and useful. This essay examines four frameworks in which this notion of community was enacted: citizenship, memory, Christian solidarity, and vassalage.

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Edited by Hilaire Kallendorf