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The Yearbook of Islamic and Middle Eastern Law (YIMEL) is the leading English language journal covering contemporary Islamic laws and laws of the Middle East. Practitioners and academics dealing with the Middle East can turn to YIMEL for an instant source of information on the developments in the Middle East region and wider Muslim world. YIMEL covers Islamic and non-Islamic legal subjects, including the laws themselves, of some twenty Arab and other Islamic countries. Focusing on YIMEL's role in publishing and disseminating ground-breaking and novel research on Islamic law, Volume 19 includes a Special Edition on the theme of Islamic Law and Empire consisting of a dedicated Preface and articles in Part I, as well as other contributions on legal developments in the Middle East and South Asia, important judgements and book reviews, assembled in Part II. The publication's practical features include: - articles on current topics, - the text of a selection of important case judgments, - book reviews.
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The Rome Statute of the ICC at its Fifteenth Anniversary (Achivements and Perspectives) is an edited book comprising of 13 chapters written by contributors to a conference dedicated to discuss the development, achievements and possible future evolution of the Rome Statute and international criminal law. The authors include academics from various legal systems, practitioners from the ICC and the Special Tribunal for Lebanon, attorneys and other practitioners and theoretics.

The International Criminal Court is the first universal international criminal tribunal. Though quite new (only 15 years have passed since the entry into force of its basic document - the Rome Statute), it has already developed interesting case-law and continues to elaborate on both substantive and procedural international criminal law.

Contributors are Ivana Hrdličková, Claus Kreß, Tamás Lattmann, Jan Lhotský, Milan Lipovský, Iryna Marchuk, Josef Mrázek, Anna Richterová, Simon De Smet, Ondřej Svaček, Pavel Šturma, Kateřina Uhlířová, Kristýna Urbanová, Aloka Wanigasuriya.
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Caleb Henry Wheeler

In The Right to Be Present at Trial in International Criminal Law Caleb Henry Wheeler analyses what it means for the accused to be present during international criminal trials and how that meaning has changed. This book also examines the impact that absence from trial can have on the fair trial rights of the accused and whether those rights can be upheld outside of the accused’s presence. Using primary and secondary sources, Caleb Wheeler has identified four different categories of absence and how each affects the right to be present. This permits a more nuanced understanding of how the right to be present is understood in international criminal law and how it may develop in the future.
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The Max Planck Yearbook of United Nations Law (UNYB), founded in 1997, appears under the auspices of the Max Planck Foundation for International Peace and the Rule of Law. The first part, ‘The Law and Practice of the United Nations’, concentrates on the legal fundamentals of the UN, its Specialized Agencies and Programmes. The second part, ‘Legal Issues Related to the Goals of the United Nations’, analyses achievements with regard to fulfilling the main objectives of the UN. The UNYB addresses both scholars and practitioners, giving them insights into the workings, challenges and evolution of the UN.
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The International Protection Alternative in Refugee Law

Treaty Basis and Scope of Application under the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees and Its 1967 Protocol

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Jessica Leigh Schultz

Under what circumstances can a state refuse refugee status to a person whose risk of persecution exists in only part of her country of origin? In this book, Jessica Schultz examines the treaty basis and criteria for the ‘internal protection alternative’ (IPA), a commonly invoked limit on the right to refugee status. She finds that the scope for applying the IPA under the Refugee Convention is narrower than is usually conceived in contemporary state practice and legal theory.
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Kushtrim Istrefi

In European Judicial Responses to Security Council Resolutions: A Consequentialist Assessment, Kushtrim Istrefi examines the multiple effects of European courts decisions as regards Security Council targeted sanctions and security detentions interfering with fundamental rights. He elaborates what type of judicial responses ensured real and practical respect for human rights for the petitioners, encouraged Security Council due process reform, clarified Security Council authorisations on security detentions, and tested the primacy and universal character of the UN Charter.
Making use of legal and non-legal instruments, including confidential leaks, Istrefi sheds some light upon what happened to, among others, petitioners, the SC due process reform agenda, and the UN Charter after such cases as Kadi, Al-Jedda, Ahmed, Al-Dulimi.
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This collective volume draws on the themes of intersectionality and overlapping policy universes to examine and evaluate the shifting functions, frames and multiple actors and instruments of an ongoing and revitalized cooperation in EU external migration and asylum policies with third states. The contributions are characterized by a problem-driven research and seek to develop bottom-up policy-oriented solutions, while taking into account global, EU-based and local perspectives and the shifting universes of EU migration, border and asylum policies. In 15 chapters, we explore the multifaceted dimensions of the EU external migration policy and its evolution in post-crisis geopolitical environment of the Global Compacts.
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Regionalism and Human Protection

Reflections from Southeast Asia and Africa

This book provides a detailed examination of how norms concerning human rights, civilian protection and prevention of mass atrocities have fared in the regions of Southeast Asia and Africa. Originated as a spin off of the journal GR2P (vol. 8/2-3, 2016), it has been enriched with new chapters and revised contents, which contrast the different experiences of those regions and investigates the expression of human protection norms in regional organisations and thematic policy agendas as well as the role of civil society mechanisms/processes. Hunt and Morada have brought together scholar-practitioners from across the world.The collection identifies a range of insights that provide rich opportunities for south-south exchange and mutual learning when it comes to promoting and building capacity for human protection at the regional level.
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Revisiting Unity and Diversity in Federal Countries

Changing Concepts, Reform Proposals and New Institutional Realities

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The principal aim of this book is to revisit the basic theme of “unity and diversity” that remains at the heart of research into federalism and federation. It is time to take another look at its contemporary relevance to ascertain how far the bifocal relationship between unity and diversity has evolved over the years and has been translated into changing conceptual lenses, practical reform proposals and in some cases new institutional practices. This book is structured around four main parts: (1) the evolving conception of diversity over time and across continents; (2) the interplay between unity and diversity in complex settings; (3) federalism as decision-making and new institutional practices that have been put forward and tested; and (4) constitutional design and asymmetrical federalism as a way to respond to legitimate and insisting claims and political demands.
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This important and unique volume begins with seven essays that discuss the contemporary challenges to implementing international humanitarian law. Its second and largest section comprises 263 entries covering the vast majority of IHL concepts. Written by a wide range of experts, each entry explains the essential legal parameters of a particular element of IHL, while offering practical examples and, where relevant, historical considerations, and supplying a short bibliography for further research. The starting point for the selection were notions arising from the Geneva Conventions, the Additional Protocols, and other IHL treaties. However, the reader will also encounter entries going beyond the typical scope of IHL, such as those related to the protection of the natural environment and animals, and entries that, in addition to an IHL perspective, discuss relevant issues through the lens of human rights law, refugee law, international criminal law, the law on State responsibility, national law, and so on. The editors have also attempted to take into account certain concepts that have no direct foundation in IHL, but that are commonly used in mass media and politics, or generate wide interest in contemporary society, such as drones, economic warfare, cyber warfare, sniping, targeted killings, transitional justice, terrorism, and many other topics. The Companion to International Humanitarian Law offers a much-needed tool for both scholars and practitioners, supplying information accessible enough to enable a variety of users to quickly familiarise themselves with it and sufficiently comprehensive to be a source for reflection and further research for more demanding users. Its aim is to facilitate the practical application of IHL, and be of use to a wide audience interested in or confronted with IHL, ranging from professionals in humanitarian assistance and protection in the field, legal officers and advisers at the national and international level, trainers, academics, scholars, and students.