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In Children and the Responsibility to Protect, Bina D’Costa and Luke Glanville bring together more than a dozen academics and practitioners from around the world to examine the intersections of the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) principle and the theory and practice of child protection. Contributors consider themes including how the agency and vulnerability of children is represented and how their voices are heard in discussions of R2P and child protection, and the merits of drawing together the R2P and Children and Armed Conflict (CAAC) agendas, as well as case studies of children’s lives in conflict zones, child soldiers, and children born of conflict-related sexual violence.

This collection of essays was first published in the journal Global Responsibility to Protect (vol.10/1-2, 2018) as a special issue.

Contributors are: J. Marshall Beier, Letícia Carvalho, Bina D’Costa, Myriam Denov, Luke Glanville, Michelle Godwin, Erin Goheen Glanville, Cecilia Jacob, Dustin Johnson, Atim Angela Lakor, Katrina Lee-Koo, Ryoko Nakano, Jochen Prantl, Jeremy Shusterman, Hannah Sparwasser Soroka, Timea Spitka, Jana Tabak, Shelly Whitman.
Legal Framework and Current Issues
In Germany, as elsewhere, couples and individuals suffering from unwanted childlessness have two principal means to overcome it. One, adoption, has existed and has been quite heavily regulated in Germany for centuries. The other, assisted reproduction, has only recently come into its own with advances in medical technology and has not yet been comprehensively dealt with by the German legislature.
This monograph provides a survey of adoption and assisted reproduction as alternative (non-coital) ways of establishing parent-child relationships in Germany.

Other titles published in this series:
- Economic Consequences of Divorce in Korea, Hyunjin Kim; isbn 9789004323711
- Assisted Reproduction in Israel; Law, Religion and Culture, Avishalom Westreich; isbn 9789004346062
- Feminicides of Girl Children in the Family Context; An International Human Rights Law Approach, Clara Chapdelaine-Feliciati; isbn 9789004330870
A Case Law Study on Selected Rights
The Convention on the Rights of the Child has changed the paradigm of how (human rights) law looks at children: from “objects” of protection to full rights-holders of all human rights. Consequently, social rights are not voluntary welfare services but an expression of the dignity and rights of the child. In Social Rights of Children in Europe Katharina Häusler provides a thorough analysis of how these basic social rights are interpreted by the three major human rights bodies on the level of the Council of Europe and the European Union. It thus offers not only an excellent picture of the main lines of interpretation but also of the major gaps and challenges for the realisation of children’s social rights in Europe.
Comparative Legal and Social Developments towards Prohibition and Beyond
Corporal Punishment of Children - Comparative Legal and Social Developments towards Prohibition and Beyond provides insights into the views and experiences of prominent academics, and political, religious, and human rights activists from Australia, Canada, Germany, Ireland, Israel, New Zealand, Norway, South Africa, Sweden, the UK, and the US. Country-specific and thematic insights in relation to children’s ongoing experience of corporal punishment are detailed and discussed, and key questions are raised and considered with a view to advancing progress towards societies in which children’s human rights to dignity and optimal development are more fully recognised.
An International Human Rights Law Approach
In Feminicides of Girl Children in the Family Context: An International Human Rights Law Approach, Clara Chapdelaine-Feliciati examines the issue of feminicide, more specifically female infanticide, and the extent to which it is addressed under international law. For this purpose, she explores the origins of son preference and ‘daughter devaluation’, and the myriad factors that underpin female infanticide. Legal semiotics is employed to analyse legislation and case law, and assess whether the provisions of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights(ICCPR 1966) sufficiently protect girl children. Amendments to the ICCPR are proposed to clarify States parties’ duty of due diligence and ensure that the crime of female infanticide is effectively prohibited, investigated, and prosecuted.
Child Fostering in West Africa in the 20th Century
In Transfers of Belonging, Erdmute Alber traces the history of child fostering in northern Benin from the pre-colonial past to the present by pointing out the embeddedness of child foster practices and norms in a wider political process of change. Child fostering was, for a long time, not just one way of raising children, but seen as the appropriate way of doing so. This changed profoundly with the arrival of European ideas about birth parents being the ‘right’ parents, but also with the introduction of schooling and the differentiation of life chances. Besides providing deep historical and ethnographical insights, Transfers of Belonging offers a new theoretical frame for conceptualizing parenting.
The main argument in this BRP is that assisted reproduction in Israel gives expression to and develops the right to procreate. It is a complex right, and therefore at times no consensus has been reached on the form of its actual application (as in the case of surrogacy and egg donation, and, from a different direction, in that of posthumous sperm retrieval). This right, however, despite the debates on its boundaries, is widely accepted, practiced, and even encouraged in the Israeli context, with a constructive collaboration of three main elements: the Israeli civil legal system, religious law (which in the context of the Israeli majority is Jewish law), and Israeli society and culture.
In this book Aoife Daly argues that where courts decide children’s best interests (for example about parental contact) the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child's "right to be heard" is insufficient, and autonomy should instead be the focus. Global law and practice indicate that children are regularly denied due process rights in their own best interest proceedings and find their wishes easily overridden. It is argued that a children’s autonomy principle, respecting children’s wishes unless significant harm would likely result, would ensure greater support for children in proceedings, and greater obligations on adults to engage in transparent decision-making. This book is a call for a reconceptualisation of the status of children in a key area of children’s rights.
On Belonging, Responsiveness and Hope
Re-understanding the Child’s Right to Identity - On belonging, Responsiveness and Hope, by Ya'ir Ronen offers an innovative understanding of the right to identity aiming to transform its meaning and thus its protection. Drawing on sources from different disciplines, including law, theology, philosophy, psychology and social work, the author offers a vision of social and legal change in which law is a healing force. In it, policies and practice protect children's sense of belonging recognizing human interdependence. They dignify children's disempowered narratives through their responsiveness, protect children's need to be authentic beings and nourish the hope for change and growth in children at risk and their families
In: Re-understanding the Child’s Right to Identity