This volume of Annotated Legal Documents on Islam in Europe covers Spain and consists of an annotated collection of legal documents affecting the status of Islam and Muslims. The legal texts are published in the original Spanish language while the annotations and supporting material are in English. By legal documents are meant the texts of legislation, including relevant secondary legislation, as well as significant court decisions. Each legal text is preceded by an introduction describing the historical, political and legal circumstances of its adoption, plus a short paragraph summarising its content. The focus of the collection is on the religious dimensions of being Muslim in Europe, i.e. on individuals' access to practise their religious obligations and on the ability to organise and manifest their religious life.
The Impact of Article 6 of the European Convention on Human Rights
Author: Cristina Teleki
In Due Process and Fair Trial in EU Competition Law, Cristina Teleki addresses the complex relationship between Articles 101 and 102 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union and Article 6 of the European Convention on Human Rights.
The book is built around the idea that big business can threaten democracy. Due process and fair trial should be central to the process of addressing bigness through competition law, by safeguarding independent decision-making and judicial review and by preventing competition authorities from growing into administrative behemoths threatening democracy from inside. To show this, the book combines a comprehensive review of the case-law of the European Court of Human Rights with insight from economics, psychology and systems theory.
Series Editors: Fabian Amtenbrink and Ramses A. Wessel
Nijhoff Studies in European Union Law is a refereed scholarly monographs series dedicated to the critical analysis of the current state and development of European Union law in a broad sense. Apart from constitutional, institutional and substantive issues of EU law, the series also embraces state-of-the-art interdisciplinary, comparative law and EU policies research with a clear link to European integration. Titles in the Nijhoff Studies in European Union Law series will be of particular interest to academics, policy makers and practitioners dealing with EU law and policies, as well as national and international (non) governmental institutions and bodies.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to Ingeborg van der Laan.
This book casts new light on the application of the principle of proportionality in international law. Proportionality is claimed to play a central role in governing the exercise of public power in international law and has been presented as the ‘ultimate rule of law’. It has also been the subject of fierce criticism: it is argued that it leads to unreflexive and arbitrary application of the law and deprives rights of their role as a ’firewall’ protecting individuals. But the debate on proportionality has tended to focus on the question of ‘how’ proportionality should be carried out. Much less attention has been devoted to the question of ‘who’.
This edited volume bring together scholars from a wide range of areas of international law to consider that question: whose interests are at stake when courts and other legal authorities apply the principle of proportionality? In so doing, this volume casts new light on the role which proportionality can play in international law, in shaping and modulating the power relations between the different entities governed by it.
This volume of Annotated Legal Documents on Islam in Europe covers the Czech Republic and consists of an annotated collection of legal documents affecting the status of Islam and Muslims. The legal texts are published in the original Czech language while the annotations and supporting material are in English. By legal documents are meant the texts of legislation, including relevant secondary legislation, as well as significant court decisions. Each legal text is preceded by an introduction describing the historical, political and legal circumstances of its adoption, plus a short paragraph summarising its content. The focus of the collection is on the religious dimensions of being Muslim in Europe, i.e. on individuals' access to practise their religious obligations and on the ability to organise and manifest their religious life.
Author: Nedžad Grabus
This volume of Annotated Legal Documents on Islam in Europe covers Slovenia and consists of an annotated collection of legal documents affecting the status of Islam and Muslims. The legal texts are published in the original Slovenian language while the annotations and supporting material are in English. By legal documents are meant the texts of legislation, including relevant secondary legislation, as well as significant court decisions. Each legal text is preceded by an introduction describing the historical, political and legal circumstances of its adoption, plus a short paragraph summarising its content. The focus of the collection is on the religious dimensions of being Muslim in Europe, i.e. on individuals' access to practise their religious obligations and on the ability to organise and manifest their religious life.
This book offers a legal analysis of sharing of passenger data from the EU to the US in light of the EU legal framework protecting individuals’ privacy and personal data. It aims to situate this analysis with respect to the ever-growing policies of Global North countries to introduce pre-screening procedures in border control proceedings for the purpose of the fight against terrorism. By tracing the literature on the (in)securitisation and as such depoliticization of border controls through technology-led interventions, it explores the multiplicity of purposes that passenger data sharing entail and considers the question on the limitability of fundamental rights depending on its purpose.
Practical and Theoretical Challenges to 21st Century Federalism
Beyond Autonomy forces us to rethink the meaning of autonomy as a central organising pillar of federalism. Can federations exist beyond the autonomy realm designed to promote territorial self-governance and direct representation among various levels of government? How do governments of federal systems interact over the design and implementation of policy in highly topical areas such as security, where the optimal distribution of authority is blurred? Which mechanisms promote the compromise necessary in many of today’s democratic federal systems? How do newly emerging federations in Africa and Asia design federal institutions in order to decrease conflict while promoting national solidarity? How can federal systems protect the rights of non-territorial minorities such as many indigenous peoples?
The Austrian Review of International and European Law is an annual publication providing a scholarly forum for the discussion of issues of public international and European law, with particular emphasis on topics of special interest for Austria.

Please click here for the online version including the abstracts of the articles of Austrian Review of International and European Law.
This series critically examines issues of legal doctrine and practice in Central and Eastern Europe, including studies on the harmonization of legal principles and rules; the legal impact of the intertwining of domestic economies, on the one hand, with regional economies and the processes of international trade and investment on the other. The series offers a forum for discussion of topical questions of public and private law from domestic, regional, and international perspectives. Comparative research that provides insights in legal developments that can be communicated to those interested in questions, not only of law, but also of politics, economics, and of society of countries in the region also finds a home in the series.

For information about a related title, visit the webpages of the Brill journal Review of Central and East European Law.