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Animal experimentation has been one of the most controversial areas of animal use, mainly due to the intentional harms inflicted upon animals for the sake of hoped-for benefits in humans. Despite this rationale for continued animal experimentation, shortcomings of this practice have become increasingly more apparent and well-documented. However, these limitations are not yet widely known or appreciated, and there is a danger that they may simply be ignored. The 51 experts who have contributed to Animal Experimentation: Working Towards a Paradigm Change critically review current animal use in science, present new and innovative non-animal approaches to address urgent scientific questions, and offer a roadmap towards an animal-free world of science.
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The Ecosystem Approach in Ocean Planning and Governance

Perspectives from Europe and Beyond

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The Ecosystem Approach in Ocean Planning and Governance takes stock of the challenges associated with implementing an ecosystem approach in ocean governance. In addition to theorizing the notion of Ecosystem Approach and its multifaceted implications, the book provides in depth analyses of lessons learned and remaining challenges associated with making the Ecosystem Approach fully relevant and operational in different marine policy fields, including marine spatial planning, fisheries, and biodiversity protection. In doing so, it adds much needed legal and social science perspectives to the existing literature on the Ecosystem Approach in relation to the marine environment. While focusing predominantly on the European context, the perspective is enriched by analyses from other jurisdictions, including the USA.
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In Permutations of Responsibility in International Law the concept of responsibility in international law is tackled from a multitude of angles. The various contributions, which emerged from the proceedings of the ILA Hellenic Branch Regional Conference (2012), examine both classical and modern issues relating to the nature of responsibility, both as responsibility for unlawful acts and liability for lawful acts, the multifariousness of actors whose actions (or omissions) may give rise to responsibility and finally the plethora of responsibility-related issues that have emerged in different areas of international law, be it international law of the sea, trade and investment or human rights law.
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Corruption and Targeted Sanctions

Law and Policy of Anti-Corruption Entry Bans

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Anton Moiseienko

In Corruption and Targeted Sanctions, Anton Moiseienko analyses the blacklisting foreigners suspected of corruption and the probation of their entry into the sanctioning state from an international law perspective. The implications of such actions have been on the international agenda for years and have gained particular prominence with the adoption by the US and Canada of the so-called Magnitsky legislation in 2016. Across the Atlantic, several European states followed suit.

The proliferation of anti-corruption entry sanctions has prompted a reappraisal of applicable human rights safeguards, along with issues of respect for official immunities and state sovereignty. On the basis of a comprehesive review of relevant law and policy, Anton Moiseienko identifies how targeted sanctions can ensure accountability for corruption while respecting international law.
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Launched in 1991, the Asian Yearbook of International Law is a major internationally-refereed yearbook dedicated to international legal issues as seen primarily from an Asian perspective. It is published under the auspices of the Foundation for the Development of International Law in Asia (DILA) in collaboration with DILA-Korea, the Secretariat of DILA, in South Korea. When it was launched, the Yearbook was the first publication of its kind, edited by a team of leading international law scholars from across Asia. It provides a forum for the publication of articles in the field of international law and other Asian international legal topics.

The objectives of the Yearbook are two-fold. First, to promote research, study and writing in the field of international law in Asia; and second, to provide an intellectual platform for the discussion and dissemination of Asian views and practices on contemporary international legal issues.

Each volume of the Yearbook contains articles and shorter notes; a section on Asian state practice; an overview of the Asian states’ participation in multilateral treaties and succinct analysis of recent international legal developments in Asia; a bibliography that provides information on books, articles, notes, and other materials dealing with international law in Asia; as well as book reviews. This publication is important for anyone working on international law and in Asian studies.
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The European Convention for the Prevention of Torture and Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment was adopted by the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe in June 1987. It entered into force in February 1989 and all 47 member States are Parties to the Convention. The Convention has already established itself as an important human rights instrument. Its approach is quite different from that of the European Convention on Human Rights. Whereas the ECHR provides a remedy for particular human rights violations after the event, the Convention for the Prevention of Torture (ECPT) seeks to prevent human rights violations, through a system of visits to places of detention. The Convention is intended to be an integrated part of the Council of Europe system for the protection of human rights, placing a proactive non-judicial mechanism alongside the reactive judicial mechanism established under the ECHR.
The Yearbook of the European Convention for the Prevention of Torture offers an essential annual overview of developments in relation to the ECPT.
Part One contains general information. Part Two is about the European Committee for the prevention of torture and inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment (CPT). Part Three is a general report on the activities of the European Committee for the prevention of torture and inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment. Part Four contains reports on visits by the European Committee for the prevention of torture and inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment and responses of governments.

Bilingual: English and French; 2-volume set.
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Alexandre Skander Galand

This book offers a unique critical analysis of the legal nature, effects and limits of UN Security Council referrals to the International Criminal Court (ICC). Alexandre Skander Galand provides, for the first time, a full picture of two competing understandings of the nature of the Security Council referrals to the ICC, and their respective normative interplay with legal barriers to the exercise of universal prescriptive and adjudicative jurisdiction. The book shows that the application of the Rome Statute through a Security Council referral is inherently limited by the UN Charter as well as the Rome Statute, and can conflict with other branches of international law, including international human rights law, the law on immunities and the law of treaties. Hence, it spells out a conception of the nature and effects of Security Council referrals that responds to these limits and, in turn, informs the reader on the nature of the ICC itself.
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Caleb Henry Wheeler

In The Right to Be Present at Trial in International Criminal Law Caleb H. Wheeler analyses what it means for the accused to be present during international criminal trials and how that meaning has changed. This book also examines the impact that absence from trial can have on the fair trial rights of the accused and whether those rights can be upheld outside of the accused’s presence. Using primary and secondary sources, Caleb Wheeler has identified four different categories of absence and how each affects the right to be present. This permits a more nuanced understanding of how the right to be present is understood in international criminal law and how it may develop in the future.
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The Max Planck Yearbook of United Nations Law (UNYB), founded in 1997, appears under the auspices of the Max Planck Foundation for International Peace and the Rule of Law. The first part, ‘The Law and Practice of the United Nations’, concentrates on the legal fundamentals of the UN, its Specialized Agencies and Programmes. The second part, ‘Legal Issues Related to the Goals of the United Nations’, analyses achievements with regard to fulfilling the main objectives of the UN. The UNYB addresses both scholars and practitioners, giving them insights into the workings, challenges and evolution of the UN.