The Asian Yearbook of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law aims to publish peer-reviewed scholarly articles and reviews as well as significant developments in human rights and humanitarian law. It examines international human rights and humanitarian law with a global reach, though its particular focus is on the Asian region.

The focused theme of Volume 4 is Law, Culture and Human Rights in Asia and the Middle East.
In Korean Nonprofit/Non-Government Sector Research, Sung-Ju Kim and Jin-Kyung Jung review the various aspects of the nonprofit sector in South Korea. The authors discuss the historical progress of the South Korean nonprofit sector; the internal and external environments of the nonprofit sector; its legal aspects and financial resources; collaboration among nonprofit, for-profit, and government agencies; and current challenges for the nonprofit sector in South Korea.
In: China Law and Society Review
Author: Ethan Michelson

Figuring prominently in prevailing portraits of activism and political contention in contemporary China are weiquan [rights defense] lawyers. Outside of China, the word weiquan emerged in the early 2000s and had achieved near-hegemonic status by the late 2000s as a descriptive label for a corps of activist lawyers—who numbered between several dozen and several hundred—committed to the cause and mobilizing in pursuit of human rights protections vis-à-vis China’s authoritarian party-state. This article challenges the dominant nomenclature of Chinese activism, in which weiquan in general and weiquan lawyers in particular loom large. A semantic history of the word weiquan, traced through an analysis of four decades of officially sanctioned rights discourse, reveals its politically legitimate origins in the official lexicon of the party-state. Unique survey data collected in 2009 and 2015 demonstrate that Chinese lawyers generally understood the word in terms of the party-state’s official language of rights, disseminated through its ongoing public legal education campaign. Because the officially-sanctioned meaning of weiquan, namely “to protect citizens’ lawful rights and interests,” is consistent with the essential professional responsibility of lawyers, fully half of a sample of almost 1,000 practicing lawyers from across China self-identified as weiquan lawyers. Such a massive population of self-identified weiquan lawyers—approximately 80,000 in 2009 assuming that the sample is at least reasonably representative—makes sense only if local meanings of the term profoundly diverge from its dominant English-language representations. Concluding speculations consider and call for further research on why this word was appropriated and redefined by activist Chinese lawyers in the first place.

In: China Law and Society Review
Author: Guofu Liu
Understanding Chinese refugee law is difficult for those outside China or unfamiliar with it due to the complex factors involved. Chinese Refugee Law offers a comprehensive, up-to-date, and readily accessible reference to Chinese refugee law. It focuses first on existing laws and practices relating to refugees in China, then offering a scholar's proposal for a law to handle with refugee affairs and implement the Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees. The book provides the detail, insight and background information needed to understand this complex area of law. It examines both existing Chinese statutes and relevant international documents, drawing on and comparing Chinese and English language sources. It is thus an invaluable resource for both Chinese and non-Chinese readers alike.
Editors: Seokwoo Lee and Hee Eun Lee
Launched in 1991, the Asian Yearbook of International Law is a major internationally-refereed yearbook dedicated to international legal issues as seen primarily from an Asian perspective. It is published under the auspices of the Foundation for the Development of International Law in Asia (DILA) in collaboration with DILA-Korea, the Secretariat of DILA, in South Korea. When it was launched, the Yearbook was the first publication of its kind, edited by a team of leading international law scholars from across Asia. It provides a forum for the publication of articles in the field of international law and other Asian international legal topics.

The objectives of the Yearbook are two-fold: First, to promote research, study and writing in the field of international law in Asia; and second, to provide an intellectual platform for the discussion and dissemination of Asian views and practices on contemporary international legal issues.

Each volume of the Yearbook contains articles and shorter notes; a section on Asian state practice; an overview of the Asian states’ participation in multilateral treaties and succinct analysis of recent international legal developments in Asia; a bibliography that provides information on books, articles, notes, and other materials dealing with international law in Asia; as well as book reviews. This publication is important for anyone working on international law and in Asian studies.

The 2017 edition of the Yearbook is a special volume that has articles highlighting current international legal issues facing particular Asian states.
Author: Mo Zhang
Chinese Contract Law (2nd Ed) offers an in-depth analysis of the contract making process, performance and remedies in the legal framework established under the current regulatory scheme governing contracts in China. The book discusses various contract issues from theoretic and practical viewpoints, and addresses major contractual matters in a comparative way. It examines the law of contracts as drafted, interpreted and applied with Chinese characteristics.

The second edition comprises the latest developments in contract legislation, adjudication and practices in China, including the newly adopted laws, judicial interpretations and guiding cases. It emphasizes contextual distinctions and transactional considerations relevant to contract research and practice. The book provides a meaningful tool to get inside the contemporary contract law of China.
Cooperation and Engagement in the Asia-Pacific Region brings together contributions from leading experts around the world in the law of the sea. The volume addresses topics such as regional cooperation, protection and preservation of the marine environment, freedom of navigation, sustainable fisheries, and future cooperation within the important Asia-Pacific region. This book provides valuable insight into a region that encompasses many important maritime regions, and harbors promising opportunities for maritime cooperation and engagement.
Author: Yu Yan
In Road Traffic Liability in China: A View from Law and Economics, Yu Yan provides an in-depth analysis of the Chinese road traffic liability system, as well as other alternative accident prevention schemes from a view of law and economics. The analysis refers to the functioning of the system both on paper and in practice. The conclusion shows that the current Chinese traffic liability system can only achieve partial deterrence, and that the problems of under-compensation and insufficient risk-spreading seem to be serious, at least in the economically underdeveloped regions. Based on these findings, Yu Yan suggests specific legislative changes to be taken for the policymakers to improve the system.