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Historical Explorations
International Law and Islam: Historical Explorations offers a unique opportunity to examine the Islamic contribution to the development of international law in historical perspective. The role of Islam in its various intellectual, political and legal manifestations within the history of international law is part of the exciting intellectual renovation of international and global legal history in the dawn of the twenty-first century. The present volume is an invitation to engage with this thriving development after ‘generations of prejudiced writing’ regarding the notable contribution of Islam to international law and its history.
By virtue of ratifying the Women’s Convention, Egypt is internationally obliged to eliminate gender discrimination in its domestic legislation. Yet, women in Egypt face various forms of discrimination. This may legally be justified through Sharia-based reservations, which many Muslim-majority countries enter to human rights treaties to evade an obligation of implementation where Human Rights run counter to Sharia. This book examines the compatibility of Sharia-based reservations with international law and identifies discrepancies between Sharia and domestic law in order to determine rights Egyptian women are entitled to according to Sharia, and yet denied under Egyptian law. Account is moreover given to Egypt’s implementation efforts in the non-reserved areas of law. To this end, Egypt’s 2014 Constitution and four areas of statutory law are examined as case studies, namely, female genital mutilation; human trafficking; nationality; and labor law.
Ahmad Alkhamees defines Creative Shari‘ah compliance as compliance with the letter but not the objectives of Shari‘ah. In recent years, Islamic finance industry practises have come under scrutiny, with strong critiques levelled against many institutions that claim to provide Shari‘ah-compliant products and services, which in fact undermine the spirit and the objectives of Shari‘ah. This book significantly contributes to the sphere of Islamic finance in three main ways. First, it critically appraises justifications of creative Shari‘ah compliance practises. Second, it examines how Shari‘ah supervisory board (SSB) governance practises, and the inconsistent fatwas issued by SSBs, contribute to the issue of creative Shari‘ah compliance. Most importantly, it suggests regulatory mechanisms which regulators can employ in Islamic countries such as Saudi Arabia and in secular countries such as the United Kingdom to deal with the issue of creative Shari‘ah compliance.
Editor: Ardi Imseis
Under the editorship of Ardi Imseis, Volume 18 of the Palestine Yearbook of International Law features articles on: colonialism and apartheid; the Mavi Marmara Flotilla; populist legal movements; corporate accountability for human rights violations; the World Trade Organization; and state crimes.

The Yearbook is an unparalleled reference work of general international law, in particular as related to Palestine. The Yearbook regularly features English-language articles reviewing contemporary legal questions and translations of key legislation, court decisions, and academic material. It is intended for use by legal practitioners, government officials, researchers, scholars, and students. Published in cooperation with the Birzeit University Institute of Law, the Yearbook is a valuable resource for anyone seeking well-researched and timely information about Palestine and related legal issues.

Contributors: Valentina Azarova; Birju Dattani; Nina Jorgensen; Victor Kattan; John Reynolds; Ozlem Ulgen; Kim Van der Borght and Hisham Awwad.
Financial Engineering and Product Innovation
The Sukūk market is the fastest growing segment of international finance. The study explores the dimension of this market, its growth globally and the main Sukūk markets. The liquidity in this market, the main currency denomination, the subscription diversification, the subprime crisis effects and the dominant structures are elaborated. The difference between sovereign and corporate Sukūk, the benefits and reasons behind Sukūk issuance as well as the Sharī‘ah basis are analysed. Securitisation as the best way forward for Sukūk structuring is scrutinized. The study also discusses the various legal, Sharī‘ah, financial and operational risks facing Sukūk as well as the default controversies. Finally the book examines the methodologies in rating Sukūk and highlights the issues of Sukūk listing, Sukūk index and Sukūk fund.
International Law and the Reform of Sharī’a-derived Legislation
The debate surrounding women’s family rights under Sharī’a-derived law has long been held captive to the competing fundamentalisms of universalism and cultural relativism. These two conflicting perspectives fail to promote practical tools through which such laws can be reformed, without prejudice to their religious nature. This book examines the development of Egypt’s Sharī’a-derived family law, and its compatibility with international obligations to eliminate discrimination against women. It highlights the interplay between domestic reform processes, grounded in the tools of takhayyur, talfiq and ijtihad, and international institutions and mechanisms. In attempting to reconcile these two seemingly dissonant value systems, this book underscores the shortcomings of Egypt’s legislation, proposes particular reforms, while simultaneously presenting alternatives to insular interpretations of international women’s rights law.
While the system of international law is improving enormously and certain legal provisions are becoming an integral part of jus cogens norms, this body of law must be studied together with other systems which have basically been effective in its development. The principles of the rule of law must be evaluated collectively rather than selectively. In fact, most Islamic nations have ratified the ICC Statute. They have thereby contributed to the establishment of the pillars of morality, equality, peace and justice. At the same time, those pillars may be strengthened by means of an accurate interpretation of the principles of international criminal laws by all parties. The objective of these comparative philosophies is to examine their core principles, similarities and differences. The intention is to indicate that the variation in theories may not obstruct the legal implementation of international criminal law if their dimensions are judged objectively and with the noblest of motives towards mankind.
In: Competing Fundamentalisms and Egyptian Women’s Family Rights
In: Competing Fundamentalisms and Egyptian Women’s Family Rights