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This is the first complete description of Poumai Naga (Poula), an understudied language spoken in Manipur in northeast India. Poumai Naga belongs to the Angami-Pochuri clade of the Trans-Himalayan family. The book comprises all aspects of the language, including phonology, lexicon, morphosyntax, syntax and discourse. This work employs the tone periodic table, an innovative method used for documenting tone languages. A bilingual lexicon and a collection of fully-analysed texts are provided in the appendices. This research work represents a substantial contribution to the field of comparative Trans-Himalayan linguistics.
Band IV: Funktionswörter, Adverbien, Phraseologisches: eine Auswahl
The Wortatlas der arabischen Dialekte / Word Atlas of Arabic Dialects (WAD) intends to provide an unprecedented survey of the lexical richness and diversity of the Arabic dialects as spoken from Uzbekistan to Mauretania and Nigeria, from Malta to Sudan, and including the Ki-Nubi Creole as spoken in Uganda and Kenya. The multilingual word atlas consists of four volumes in total with some 500 onomasiological maps in full colour. Each map presents a topic or notion and its equivalents in Arabic as collected from the dialectological literature (dictionaries, grammars, text collections, ethnographic reports, etc.), from the editors’ own field work, from questionnaires filled out by native speakers or by experts for a certain dialect region, and also from the internet. Polyglot legends in German, English, French, Spanish, Italian accompany the maps to facilitate further access. Each map is followed by a commentary in German, providing more details about the sources and the individual forms, and discussing semantic and etymological issues. All quotations are in their original language. The maps mainly show lexical types, detailed and concrete forms are given in the commentaries. An introduction is provided in Volume 1 in both German and English. Indices of all lexemes in the atlas will be available for each volume. The first volume Band I: Mensch, Natur, Fauna und Flora / Volume 1: Mankind, Nature, Fauna and Flora contains subjects such as ‘family members’, ‘professions’, ‘human qualities’. The second volume, Band II: Materielle Kultur, deals with material culture (‘house’, ‘utensils’, ‘food’, ‘clothing’, ‘vehicles’, etc.). The third volume Band III: Verben, Adjektive, Zeit und Zahlen focuses on verbs, and adjectives. The forth volume Band IV: Funktionswörter und Phraseologisches will contain functionwords and some phraseological items. The atlas will be indispensable for everyone interested in the modern spoken Arabic language, as well as for dialectologists and for semanticists.
This peer-reviewed series publishes descriptions of the world's understudied languages, either as full-fledged grammars or as language sketches. The GSWL is an umbrella series currently consisting of the sub-categories for grammars and sketches on:
Mainland and Insular South East Asia (edited by Paul Sidwell and Mathias Jenny),
Romance Languages (edited by Roberta D’Alessandro),
African languages (edited by Gerrit J. Dimmendaal),
Indigenous Languages of Russia (edited by Beáta Wagner-Nagy and Valentin Gusev), and
Papuan Languages (edited by Antoinette Schapper and Lila San Roque).
This section of Grammars and Sketches of the World's Languages deals specifically with the languages of mainland and insular South East Asia, including but not limited to Austroasiatic, Hmong-Mien, Tai-Kadai, Tibeto-Burman, Austronesian and Andamanese.
This section of Grammars and Sketches of the World's Languages deals specifically with the languages of mainland and insular South East Asia, and is open to all language families of the area: Austroasiatic, Hmong-Mien, Tai-Kadai, Tibeto-Burman, Austronesian and Andamanese. Contributions can come from a range of sources, including: dissertations, field notes, and reworkings of extant studies. Ideally they will include a basic lexicon and appendix of glossed texts. For print volumes we prefer at least 200 printed book pages, these can include multiple short sketches forming coherent volumes. Shorter works as stand-alone publications can be presented as e-editions. Media files (images, audio, video) can be included in e-editions or as links in print volumes (subject to copyright considerations).

We encourage a unifying typological approach, so that these volumes are both accessible to typologists coming from different theoretical backgrounds and intelligible to the wider linguistic readership. Authors are expected to follow Leipzig glossing rules and IPA conventions. The editors may specify the TOC structure and the list of abbreviations; these will be discussed with authors at the book proposal stage.

This is a peer-reviewed series; the editors will work with authors to ensure high standards. We seek to build a diverse and highly qualified Advisory Board; interested scholars should contact the editors. For information on book proposals and publishing with Brill, please see the Resources for Authors pages.
Editor / Translator: Paul Sidwell
Not only is May otherwise undescribed in writing, it is the only small Vietic language documented and analysed in such detail, and one of few endangered Austroasiatic languages described so thoroughly.
May is predominantly monosyllabic, yet retains traces of affixes and consonant clusters that reflect older disyllabic forms. It is tonal, and also manifests breathy phonation and vowel ongliding, yeilding a remarkable complexity of syllable types. The lexicon, which is extensively documented, has a substantial achaic component. Consequently, the volume provides an invaluable resource for comparative historical and typological studies.
This book is an English translation of the 2018 Russian language monograph by Babaev and Samarina.
Mursi is a Nilo-Saharan language spoken by a small group of people who live in the Lower Omo Valley, Ethiopia, and is one of the most endangered languages of the country.
Based on the fieldwork that the author conducted in beautiful villages of the Mursi community, this descriptive grammar is organized into fourteen chapters rich in examples and an appendix containing four transcribed texts. The readers are thus provided with a clear and useful tool, which constitutes and important addition to our knowledge of Mursi and of other related languages spoken in the area.
Besides being an empirical data source for linguists interested in typology and endangered language description and documentation, the grammar constitutes an invaluable gift to the speech community.
Editor: Brian D. Joseph
The field of linguistics thrives on empirical data, whether from languages, from psycholinguistic experiments, from sociolinguistic interviews, from typological surveys, or from historical investigations, to name just a few sources of data. At the same time, the field also thrives on theory, inasmuch as general theories of language structure, language use, language acquisition, and language change are essential to a full understanding of how the object of our investigations, natural human language, works. Theories provide a basis for testable claims about language, claims that can be tested and confirmed or disproved only by empirical considerations.

Empirical Approaches to Linguistic Theory (EALT) aims to publish high-quality works that are grounded in empirical data but at the same time advance theoretical goals. The relevant notion of 'theory' envisioned here is broad and eclectic, but also rigorous. The contributing empirical data is similarly broadly defined. The series includes single or co-authored monographs on a single topic or linguistic issue, state-of-the art reports and/or thematically coherent multi-authored volumes.

Prospective authors are invited to submit proposals for this series, to be vetted by the series editors, in which the particular theoretical constructs and/or claims to be examined are identified along with the empirical basis for the investigation.
Romance languages have come to play a central role within general linguistics over the last years. Many minor varieties have attracted the interest of scholars, and this has led to the proliferation of articles and books on Romance. While the understanding of various phenomena in the Romance languages has seen many advances, the documentation side has slowed down significantly. Minor Romance languages are less and less documented, both because of a lack of funds and because they are steadily being replaced by standard languages. Those linguists that still dedicate time and effort towards documenting and describing non-standard Romance varieties are often unable to find a venue to publish their work.
A series on the grammars of Romance languages has been long a desideratum among the linguistic community. The Romance subseries of Brill's series Grammars and Sketches of the World’s Languages finally offers a proper venue for such valuable studies, which will appeal to Romance scholars and students working on Romance, as well as linguists keen to discover information about the numerous Romance varieties that are spoken todays in Europe and the Americas.
The series features books on synchronic and diachronic grammars, the phonology, morphology, and syntax of one or more Romance languages. While these grammars can be theoretically informed, this series does not feature specific theoretical analyses of language phenomena, but aims to be accessible to a broad audience. Theoretical tools are thus welcome, but do not constitute the main aim of the series.

This is a peer-reviewed series; the editor will work with authors to ensure high standards. For information on book proposals and publishing with Brill, please see the Resources for Authors pages.
Editor: Juan-Pablo Vita
Akkadian is, after Sumerian, the second oldest language attested in the Ancient Near East, as well as the oldest known Semitic language. It is also a language with one of history’s longest written records. And yet, unlike other relevant languages written over a long period of time, there has been no volume dedicated to its own history. The aim of the present work is to fill that void. The outcome is presented in 26 chapters written by 25 leading authors and divided into two volumes, the first covering the linguistic background and early periods and the second covering the second and first millennia BCE as well as its afterlife.
This peer-reviewed series publishes concise books in all areas of general and applied linguistics. The series welcomes manuscripts consisting of state-of-the-art overviews as well research monographs.