Browse results

The volume aims to be a reference work for all researchers interested in the study of fictional dialogue and its translation in suspense novels and films as well as in related genres. The volume also aims to determine the interplay between the creation of suspense and fictional dialogue. The particular interest in dialogue comes from the host of roles it plays in fiction. It helps create suspense and arouses a whole range of feelings in the reader or the audience related to the development of the plot.
Fictional dialogue is the discursive method of evoking orality, conferring authenticity and credibility on a plot and giving fictional characters a voice. As a narrative strategy, dialogue is an important resource that enables the writer to shape the character’s subjectivity. In thrillers the characters’ voice is part of the process of creating suspense, an element of uncertainty, anxiety and excitement, which is not exclusive to this genre. To clearly differentiate suspense from the tension created by other types of fiction, this volume aims to study the relationship between the characters’ voices and the building of suspense and to describe the translation difficulties arising from this particular interdependence.
This book explores the birth, life and afterlife of the story of Romeo and Juliet, by looking at Italian translations/rewritings for page, stage and screen. Through its analysis of published translations, theatre performances and film adaptations, the volume offers a thorough investigation of the ways in which Romeo and Juliet is handled by translators, as well as theatre and cinema practitioners. By tracing the journey of the “star-crossed lovers” from the Italian novella to Shakespeare and back to Italy, the book provides a fascinating account of the transformations of the tale through time, cultures, languages and media, enabling a deeper understanding of the ongoing fortune of the play and exploring the role and meaning of translation. Due to its interdisciplinarity, the book will appeal to anyone interested in translation studies, theatre studies, adaptation studies, Shakespeare films and Shakespeare in performance. Moreover, it will be a useful resource for both lecturers and students.
In: Audiovisual Translation and Media Accessibility at the Crossroads

Since 1983, SWISS TXT - a subsidiary of the Swiss public broadcasting corporation (SRG SSR idée suisse) - has been providing subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing in three of Switzerland's national languages: French, German and Italian. Speech-recognition software has been used since 2008 to subtitle live television programmes in French, German and Italian. Two issues are at stake when subtitling: (1) how to subtitle real live events such as football games, chat shows, parliamentary debates and correspondents' reports, and (2) how deaf or hard-of-hearing viewers can follow the broadcasting of these events on television. The answers to both questions lie in live subtitles. Throughout the implementation and development of live subtitling, the aim has been to improve the service. This contribution describes the challenges posed by speech-recognition systems and the technology and techniques that - in collaboration with WDR Videotext and the engineers from FAB - have been developed at SWISS TXT. It focuses on ways to improve transmission speed and achieve an optimum display mode of respoken subtitles.

In: Audiovisual Translation and Media Accessibility at the Crossroads

De Madame Dacier au père Brumoy, l’histoire des traductions en français d’Aristophane s’écrit en pointillés. Des traductions incomplètes, parfois même remplacées par des résumés, un sentiment d’étrangeté voire d’irréductibilité, renforcé par l’influence supposée du dramaturge sur les affaires du temps (la condamnation de Socrate), palliée ou désignée mais non compensée par un appareil de notes : tout concourt à faire d’Aristophane un auteur que l’on peine à assimiler, et peut-être pour cela porteur d’un « génie » grec que l’on refuse de considérer comme un modèle ; la « grossièreté » d’Aristophane est un lieu commun qui aboutit au jugement définitif de Voltaire : « Aristophane, poète comique qui n’est ni poète ni comique » (Dictionnaire philosophique, 1764). Au XVIIIe siècle, comment rendre représentable ce qui est si constamment désigné comme étranger et obscène ? Telle est la contradiction interne de ces traductions.

In: Philologie et théâtre

The issue of interpretation in audio description (AD) continues to divide both AD practitioners and researchers. In this contribution, we look at interpretation from the point of view of narratological behaviour of sighted viewers. To this end, we analyse data from twelve languages collected in the Pear Tree Project - a research project in which sighted viewers were asked to watch a short film and subsequently recount what they saw. Linking our findings to AD, we find in our analysis that sighted viewers interpret visual events but they avoid extremely subjective interpretations or interpretations in which they pass moral judgments. Thus, we propose that instead of applying the binary opposition of objective versus subjective, we should be using an objectivity- subjectivity scale, which can help determine which interpretive descriptions are less subjective and can consequently be used in AD without running the risk of being patronising or spoon-feeding the sense to the visually impaired.

In: Audiovisual Translation and Media Accessibility at the Crossroads

This contribution explores the effects of language fluency and different types of subtitles (intralingual and interlingual) on film comprehension. In a first experiment, we examine the role of interlingual subtitles in two experimental conditions (with and without French subtitles). In this experiment, comprehension is assessed by a test just after viewing the sequence (images, dialogues and understanding of the situation). The results show facilitating effects of subtitling for the monolinguals and inhibitory effects for bilinguals. In a second experiment, the participants are divided into three groups depending on their knowledge of the oral language of the film (English). Subsequently, the participants are shown three versions of the sequence (non-subtitled, with English (intralingual) or French (interlingual) subtitles). The results indicate an interaction of both experimental factors. This implies an overall facilitating effect of subtitles for the beginner group (particularly when the subtitles are presented in the participants' first language), which is in contrast with a distracting effect for the advanced group (more so when both known languages are on-screen). A third study seeks to evaluate the opportunities that these different types of subtitles may provide in foreign language acquisition or consolidation.

In: Audiovisual Translation and Media Accessibility at the Crossroads
In: Audiovisual Translation and Media Accessibility at the Crossroads
In: Philologie et théâtre

La première traduction française des comédies de Plaute par l’abbé Michel de Marolles paraît en 1658 et elle constitue un moment intéressant dans l’histoire de la réception du comique latin en France. Certaines de ses pièces avaient certes été adaptées à la scène française auparavant, mais cette édition bilingue a la prétention de transmettre un savoir érudit sur ce corpus, grâce à un apparat critique développé, tout en touchant le lectorat mondain : pour ce faire, Marolles donne un air « galant » à la traduction et au commentaire critique. La conséquence la plus frappante, en termes d’herméneutique des textes, de cette nouvelle posture du traducteur et de l’éditeur « scientifique », est l’inscription des réflexions de Marolles, souvent intéressantes, sur la dramaturgie latine (usage de l’aparté, métathéâtralité…) dans les débats contemporains sur le théâtre, grâce au dialogue qu’il mène, dans les notes et remarques, avec La Mesnardiere ou d’Aubignac.

In: Philologie et théâtre