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Vol. V, Section 6: The Greeks, the Romans, the Byzantines, the Franks, and the Goths
Editor: Mayte Penelas
This volume contains the edition and translation of the chapter of al-Maqrīzī’s al-Ḫabar ʿan al-bašar dealing with Greeks, Romans, Byzantines, Franks, and Goths. This chapter is, for the most part, an almost exact reproduction of Ibn Ḫaldūn’s Kitāb al-ʿIbar, from which al-Maqrīzī derived material from many other sources, including prominent Christian sources such as Kitāb Hurūšiyūš, Ibn al-ʿAmīd’s History, and works by Muslim historians like Ibn al-Aṯīr’s Kāmil. Therefore, this chapter of al-Ḫabar ʿan al-bašar is a continuation of the previous Arabic historiographical tradition, in which European history is integrated into world history through the combination of Christian and Islamic sources.
Aramaic, South Arabian, Coptic, Arabic and Judeo-Arabic Documents
The renaissance of Arabic Papyrology has become obvious by the founding of the International Society for Arabic Papyrology (ISAP) at the Cairo conference (2002), and by its subsequent conferences in Granada (2004), Alexandria (2006), Vienna (2009), Tunis/Carthage (2012), Munich (2014), and Berlin (2018). This volume collects papers given at the Munich conference, including editions of previously unpublished Coptic, Arabic and Judeo-Arabic documents, as well as historical studies based on documentary evidence from Achaemenid Bactria, Ancient South-Arabia, and Early Islamic, Fāṭimid and Mamlūk Egypt.

Contributors: Anne Boud'hors; Ursula Bsees; Peter T. Daniels; Maher A. Eissa; Andreas Kaplony; W. Matt Malczycki; Craig Perry; Daniel Potthast; Peter Stein; Naïm Vanthieghem; Oded Zinger 
Author: Nadja Danilenko
In Picturing the Islamicate World, Nadja Danilenko explores the message of the first preserved maps from the Islamicate world. Safeguarded in al-Iṣṭakhrī’s Book of Routes and Realms (10th century C.E.), the world map and twenty regional maps complement the text to a reference book of the territories under Muslim rule. Rather than shaping the Islamicate world according to political or religious concerns, al-Iṣṭakhrī chose a timeless design intended to outlast upheavals. Considering the treatise was transmitted for almost a millennium, al-Iṣṭakhrī’s strategy seems to have paid off. By investigating the Persian and Ottoman translations and all extant manuscripts, Nadja Danilenko unravels the manuscript tradition of al-Iṣṭakhrī’s work, revealing who took an interest in it and why.
Ḫvāndamīrs Ḥabīb as-siyar im Handschriftenzeitalter
Author: Philip Bockholt
In Geschichtsschreibung im Handschriftenzeitalter, Philip Bockholt addresses the question of how history was written in the premodern Islamic world, and offers new insights into one of the most important chronicles composed in Persian, Khvāndamīr’s universal history Ḥabīb al-siyar. Taking into account the political events which occurred in Iran and India around 1500, he examines the manuscript tradition of the work, and gives an in-depth analysis of how the author adapted his chronicle to the Shiʿi and Sunni religio-political outlook of his Safavid and Mughal overlords. Making use of new approaches in the fields of history and philology, Philip Bockholt convincingly proves how texts were transmitted and modified for various audiences during premodern times.

In Geschichtsschreibung im Handschriftenzeitalter untersucht Philip Bockholt am Beispiel von Ḫvāndamīrs Weltgeschichtschronik Ḥabīb as-siyar, wie Geschichte in der islamischen Vormoderne geschrieben wurde. Vor dem Hintergrund der politischen Umbrüche in Iran und Indien um 1500 analysiert er die intentionale Ebene von Historiografie und zeigt auf, wie ein Historiker sein Werk in verschiedenen Fassungen sowohl für die Safaviden als auch die Moguln an schiitische und sunnitische Kontexte anpasste. Mit der Erforschung der Handschriftentradition eines der am häufigsten kopierten Geschichtswerke der islamischen Welt legt Philip Bockholt die Techniken des Autors offen, die Darstellung von Ereignissen im Sinne des jeweiligen Patrons zu verändern, wodurch Einblicke in den Prozess von Geschichtsschreibung sowie zu Textüberlieferung und Leserschaft im Handschriftenzeitalter möglich werden.
Author: Tobias Nünlist
Schutz und Andacht im Islam befasst sich mit handschriftlichen Dokumenten in Rollenform, die zwischen dem 14. und 19. Jh. entstanden sind. Die vorgestellten Belegstücke stammen aus unterschiedlichen geographischen Kontexten: a. Städtedreieck Tabriz-Konya-Bagdad; b. persischer Kulturraum; c. Osmanisches Reich. Diese Rollen waren bei Angehörigen von Männerbünden (Sufi-Orden, Futuwwa- und Aḫī-Gruppierungen, Gilden) beliebt. Die Studie untersucht das auf diesen Dokumenten verwendete textliche und ge¬stalterische Vokabular. Neben Passagen aus dem Koran (auch vollständige Abschriften) lassen sich oft Gebete und weitere Texte frommen Inhalts feststellen. Gelegentlich finden sich Hinweise, dass die Dokumente aus heterodoxen Umfeldern stammen. Die Studie unterstreicht ausserdem den hohen kunsthistorischen Wert der vorgestellten Belegstücke, die oft für Angehörige von gesellschaftlichen Eliten angefertigt worden sind. Devotion and Protection in Islam deals with hand-written documents in the scroll format dating from the 14th–19th centuries. These documents can be attributed to various geographic contexts: a. the triangle between the cities of Tabriz, Konya and Baghdad; b. the Persianate world; c. the Ottoman Empire. These scrolls were appreciated by members of different associations ( Männerbünde; e.g. Sufi orders, Futuwwa and Aḫī groups). This study analyses the textual and ornamental vocabulary applied on the scrolls. The copied texts mostly comprise passages from the Quran and prayers. Certain features suggest that such scrolls were often produced in heterodox environments. Additionally, this study underscores the high art-historical value of these documents, particularly appreciated by members of the ruling elite.
Author: Efraim Wust
The Yahuda Collection was bequeathed to the National Library of Israel by one of the twentieth century's most knowledgeable and important collectors, Abraham Shalom Yahuda (d. 1951). The rich and multifaceted collection of 1,186 manuscripts, spanning ten centuries, includes works representing the major Islamic disciplines and literary traditions. Highlights include illuminated manuscripts from Mamluk, Mughal, and Ottoman court libraries; rare, early copies of medieval scholarly treatises; and early modern autograph copies.

In this groundbreaking Arabic catalogue, Efraim Wust synthesizes the Islamic and Western manuscript traditions to enrich our understanding of the manuscripts and their compositions. His combined treatment of Arabic, Persian, and Turkish manuscripts preserves the integrity of the collection and honors the multicultural history of the Islamic intellectual traditions.
Editor: Ayman Shihadeh
The Islamic Translation Series aims to make scholarly Arabic texts from a wide range of disciplines available to an international, English-language readership. Comprising parallel English-Arabic texts, volumes in this series are suitable for specialists, students and all those interested in the intellectual traditions of the Islamic world.

This series was previously published by Brigham Young University Press.

If you are interested in submitting book proposals for this series, please contact:
Abdurraouf Oueslati
Acquisitions Editor
oueslati@brill.com
Author: Robert Jones
From the first Arabic grammar printed at Granada in 1505 to the Arabic editions of the Dutch scholar Thomas Erpenius (d.1624), some audacious scholars - supported by powerful patrons and inspired by several of the greatest minds of the Renaissance – introduced, for the first time, the study of Arabic language and letters to centres of learning across Europe. These pioneers formed collections of Arabic manuscripts, met Arabic-speaking visitors, studied and adapted the Islamic grammatical tradition, and printed editions of Arabic texts - most strikingly in the magnificent books published by the Medici Oriental Press at Rome in the 1590s. Robert Jones’ findings in the libraries of Florence, Leiden, Paris and Vienna, and his contribution to the history of grammar, are of enduring importance.
In: Learning Arabic in Renaissance Europe (1505-1624)