Browse results

Restricted Access

Locating the Sharīʿa

Legal Fluidity in Theory, History and Practice

Series:

Edited by Sohaira Siddiqui

The study of the sharīʿa has enjoyed a renaissance in the last two decades and it will continue to attract interdisciplinary attention given the ongoing social, political and religious developments throughout the Muslim world. With such a variety of debates, and a corresponding multitude of theoretical methods, students and non-scholars are often overwhelmed by the complexity of the field. Even experts will often need to consult multiple sources to understand these new voices and provide accessible answers to specialist and non-specialist audiences alike. This volume is intended for both the novice and expert as a companion to understanding the evolution of the field of Islamic law, the current work that is shaping this field, and the new directions the sharīʿa will take in the twenty-first/fifteenth century.

Contributors are Khaled Abou El Fadl, Asma Afsaruddin Ahmad Ahmad, Sarah Albrecht, Ovamir Anjum, Dale Correa, Robert Gleave, Sohail Hanif, Rami Koujah, Marion Katz, Asifa Quraishi-Landes, David Warren and Salman Younas.
Restricted Access

Tafsir as Mystical Experience: Intimacy and Ecstasy in Quran Commentary

Tafsīr sūrat al-baqara of Sayyid ʿAlī Muḥammad Shīrāzī, The Báb (1819-1850)

Series:

Todd Lawson

In Tafsir as Mystical Experience, Todd Lawson shows how the Quran may be engaged with for meaning and understanding, the usual goal of mystical exegesis, and also how it may be engaged with through tafsīr in a quest for spiritual or mystical experience. In this earliest of the Báb’s extended works, written before his public claim to be the return of the hidden Imam, the act of reading is shown to be something akin to holy communion in which the sacred text is both entrance upon and destination of the mystic quest. The Quran here is a door to an “abode of glory” and an abiding spiritual encounter with the divine through the prophet, his daughter Fāṭima and the twelve Imams of Ithna-ʿasharī Shiʿism who inhabit the letters, words, verses and suras of the Book.

Cover calligraphy by Burhan Zahrai of Quran 53:11
Restricted Access

Series:

Edited by Florian Wilk

Scriptural Interpretation at the Interface between Education and Religion examines prominent texts from Jewish, Christian, and Islamic communities with a view to determining to what extent education ( Bildung) represents the precondition, the central feature and/or the aim of the interpretation of 'Holy Scripture' in antiquity. In particular, consideration is given to the exegetical techniques, the hermeneutical convictions and the contexts of intercultural exchange which determine the process of interpretation. The volume contains a methodological reflection as well as investigations of scriptural interpretation in Jewish texts from the 2nd and 1st centuries B.C.E., in New Testament writings, and in witnesses from late ancient Christianity and in the Qur’an. Finally, it contains a critical appraisal of the scholarly oeuvre of Hans Conzelmann. This work thus fosters scholarly understanding of the function of scriptural interpretation at the interface between education and religion.
Restricted Access

Series:

Edited by Eric F. Mason and Edmondo F. Lupieri

The seventeen studies in Golden Calf Traditions in Early Judaism, Christianity, and Islam explore the biblical origins of the golden calf story in Exodus, Deuteronomy, and 1 Kings, as well as its reception in a variety of sources: Hebrew Scriptures (Hosea, Jeremiah, Psalms, Nehemiah), Second Temple Judaism (Animal Apocalypse, Pseudo-Philo, Philo, Josephus), rabbinic Judaism, the New Testament (Acts, Paul, Hebrews, Revelation) and early Christianity (among Greek, Latin, and Syriac writers), as well as the Qur’an and Islamic literature. Expert contributors explore how each ancient author engaged with the calf traditions—whether explicitly, implicitly, or by clearly and consciously avoiding them—and elucidate how the story was used both negatively and positively for didactic, allegorical, polemical, and even apologetic purposes.
Restricted Access

Ahmad Abdullah Abu al-Haj Thabet, Abdulelah Hazea and M.Y. Zulkifli M. Yusof

Restricted Access

Yehudit Dror

Abstract

This study focuses on the grammatical content of six Quranic exegeses dating from the fourth/tenth to the seventh/thirteenth centuries (see section 1.3). The idea of exploring grammatical aspects of Quranic exegeses is not new in modern research, yet a complete analysis based on a large corpus devoted to the collection, classification, and analysis of the grammatical content of Quranic exegeses is still lacking. This study is limited to an examination of commentaries on sūrat al-nisāʾ. In these, two types of grammatical comments can be distinguished. The first are “formal comments”, in which the commentators conduct a morphological and/or syntactical analysis of various components. Such comments usually include an explicit grammatical term, and most of these have been addressed by traditional grammarians. The second type are “functional comments”. These concern issues that are less common in classical grammatical descriptions, such as agreement, coherence, pragmatics, and other related matters. Usually in these types of comments, no syntactical term is mentioned, although such explanations make important grammatical contributions.

Restricted Access

Mohammad Said Mitwally Ar-Rahawan

Abstract

A “transposed tradition” (al-hadiṯ al-maqlūb) is defined by Muslim traditionists as a hadith whose isnād is grafted to a different text or vice versa, or a hadith whose reporter reversed the order of a sentence within the text. The former is called maqlūb al-isnād, where an inversion occurs in the chain of transmission, while the latter is termed maqlūb al-matn, where an inversion occurs in the order of a sentence or a number of sentences within a text. This paper seeks to specify the date of hadith textual transpositions by using sanad-cum-matn analysis, an approach which employs intensive study of both isnād and textual analysis of hadith variants and has recently proved to be an effective tool for dating single traditions. It also attempts to identify who was responsible for transposing the text and at what stage of transmission a change occurred. On the basis of the answers to these questions, we can test the applicability and efficacy of sanad-cum-matn analysis as a research tool for uncovering hadith textual interpolations.

Restricted Access

Mohd Abd Wahab Fatoni bin Mohd Balwi, Ahmad Sufian bin Che Abdullah and Asmuliadi Lubis

Abstract

Simons’1 “levers of control” is a strategy-based framework that takes into consideration the belief systems of and the functions and interactions within an organization. The purpose of this article is to discuss Simons’ levers of control from an Islamic viewpoint, based on the teachings of the Quran and Sunna. It demonstrates that the concept of “levers of control”, as posited by Simons, does not contradict the basic tenets of Islam. In fact, all the main components of the levers of control – belief system, boundary system, diagnostic control system, and interactive system – were actually emphasized and vigorously implemented by Prophet Muhammad SAW. However, these practices have never before been organized into well-arranged and systematic categories that can be used as guidelines by Islamic organizations. Such organizations should aspire to implement comprehensively the practices of Prophet Muhammad SAW in all aspects of organizational management functions, including those related to control. However, in the absence of clear and comprehensive guidelines, any implementation may not be appropriate or in accordance with the practices of Prophet Muhammad SAW. More importantly, incorrect implementation as a result of limited understanding or misunderstanding of the Prophet’s SAW practices can affect the overall perception of Islam. By properly utilizing the levers of control, organizations that strive to emulate the practices of Prophet Muhammad SAW in their operations can be successful.