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Seventy Years of History as Seen Through German Courts
Law in West German Democracy relates the history of the Federal Republic of Germany as seen through a series of significant trials conducted between 1947 and 2017, explaining how these trials came to take place, the legal issues which they raised, and their importance to the development of democracy in a country slowly emerging from a murderous and criminal régime. It thus illustrates the central issues of the new republic. If, as a Minister for Justice once remarked, crime can be seen as ‘the reverse image of any political system, the shadow cast by the social and economic structures of the day’, it is natural to use court cases to illuminate the eventful history of the Federal Republic’s first seventy years.
Sustainable Development and the Practice of Good Governance
Editor: Wei Zhang
In The Right to Development authors offer a new path for the implementation and protection of the right to development from the new perspective of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.
Instead of emphasizing the economic perspective, this book focuses on how to realize the right to sustainable development by resolution of conflicts among the economy, the environment and society.
Integrating the value analysis into the empirical analysis method, this book expands the scope of the United Nations Declaration on the Right to Development and strengthens its practical function, extracts Chinese experiences, lessons from South Asia, local knowledge in South Africa and practice in Peru on the implementation of the right to development, and puts forward the idea of building human rights criteria in the South.
Environmental and Cultural Concerns
In Intergenerational Equity: Environmental and Cultural Concerns, the editors have produced an important, broad-based volume on intergenerational equity. The authors explore the principle of intergenerational equity in many dimensions, from the theoretical to the practical. While the primary focus is on intergenerational equity in the context of environmental resources and cultural heritage, the principle is also addressed in a broad array of other contexts. The final section of the volume considers intergenerational justice as it applies to indigenous peoples, genocide, migration, sovereign wealth funds and foreign investment. The chapters also provide a critical analysis of the issues and a consideration of the difficulties in implementing intergenerational equity.
This 10th thematic issue of International Development Policy presents a collection of articles exploring some of the complex development challenges associated with Africa’s recent but extremely rapid pace of urbanisation that challenges still predominant but misleading images of Africa as a rural continent. Analysing urban settings through the diverse experiences and perspectives of inhabitants and stakeholders in cities across the continent, the authors consider the evolution of international development policy responses amidst the unique historical, social, economic and political contexts of Africa’s urban development.
Can we adopt human rights concepts, long used to frame problems of social justice, to define environmental justice? Can existing social institutions provide models and tools for achieving environmental justice? This volume views old models of agency through new lenses and examines how several social institutions, such as law, education and health care, address specific environmental problems. The volume presents arguments for human obligations towards the environment and future generations. Scholars assess the limitations of existing models and others point to recent failures in protecting the interests of indigenous groups or species. And on a hopeful note, examples are given of institutions that promise some success in effecting environmental goals. As this discussion of citizenship suggests, much like environmental justice, a global context both in definition and application is required.
Following some ten years as a practicing lawyer and consultant, Kirstyn Inglis has been researching the evolving legal practice of EU enlargement for over ten years. This book, succinctly, introduces this evolving practice, covering ‘transitional arrangements’ in accession treaties, the Treaty of Lisbon, recent European Court case law, the specific governance challenge of incorporating Bulgaria and Romania and the strategy for future enlargements to bring in the Western Balkans and Turkey. In part two, the examples of the environment and the agri-food acquis are explored, including the analysis of the transitional arrangements in practice. Overall, the diversity and complexity of the pre-accession and post-accession challenge of enlargement becomes apparent, as do key challenges for the evolution of the acquis communautaire in an enlarging Union at a time when Croatia is waiting to sign its own accession treaty.