Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 13 items for :

  • Modern History x
  • Brill | Rodopi x
Clear All

Series:

Karin Grelz

Abstract

Marina Cvetaeva (1892–1941) lived a life full of incident, reflecting partly the tumultuous times in which she lived, partly her own strong personality and willingness to follow through on her commitments. Born in Moscow and with considerable experience of residence in Western Europe as a child, she lived in comfort until the Revolution, then after difficult years of War Communism she emigrated to join her husband Sergej Efron, spending a short time in Berlin, several years in Prague, and over a decade in Paris before she returned to the USSR in 1939. There her husband and daughter were arrested, and the family’s experience came to include Stalinist repression. Cvetaeva committed suicide shortly before her 49th birthday, not long after Nazi Germany invaded the Soviet Union. This chapter ties the vicissitudes of Cvetaeva’s life together with her writing and publications.

A Companion to Marina Cvetaeva

Approaches to a Major Russian Poet

Series:

Sibelan Forrester

Marina Cvetaeva is one of the best-known Russian poets of the 20th century, often translated and studied in a copious scholarly literature. With articles on Cvetaeva’s biography and her relationship with visual arts, drama, folklore, music, translation and the work of other poets, this volume offers both a valuable overview of scholarly approaches to her work today and a way to enter specific aspects of her writing and career. Contributors include both foremost established scholars of Cvetaeva’s work and young scholars taking new approaches and discovering neglected artifacts and topics. Scholars who do not read Russian will find this collection of value, as will advanced students of Russian literature, poetry, and women’s writing.

Contributors include Molly Thomasy Blasing, Karen Evans-Romaine, Sibelan Forrester, Karin Grelz, Olga Peters Hasty, Maria Khotimsky, Olga Partan, and Alexandra Smith

Series:

Sibelan E.S. Forrester

Series:

Sibelan Forrester

Abstract

Cvetaeva’s poetic use of folklore is unusual for the Silver Age, though it connects her with nineteenth-century writers, especially Pushkin. Examination of the long folkloric poems “Царь-Девица” and “Молодец”, both based on folktales found in Aleksandr Afanas’ev’s classic three-volume collection of Russian folktales, shows Cvetaeva freely engaging in folkloric strategies of adaptation. She also responds in important ways to the folkloristic commentary provided by Afanas’ev. Folklore has been a significant topic in scholarship on Cvetaeva as well.

Series:

Karen Evans-Romaine

Abstract

According to Marina Cvetaeva, she “hears” in verse, while Pasternak “sees”, and although she disliked the banal comment that her poetry is musical, music was fundamental to her identity and her work, and sound and sense inextricably connected. This chapter examines the role of music in Cvetaeva’s biography and work: musical aspects of her identity as a poet; her self-identification as a poet-“singer” and various musical voices in her work, sometimes in polyphony; her responses to contemporary poets about musical aspects of her poetry; her references to classical composers, folk genres, the song (romans) and the “cruel romance”, and Roma music; musical aspects of her poetic language, including rhythm, rhyme, and sound play, with special reference to her poem in folkloric style Мóлодец and her long poem Крысолов (The Ratcatcher); musical structures in her work; and musical settings of her verse.

Series:

Molly Thomasy Blasing

Abstract

At various points in her life Marina Tsvetaeva claimed to be indifferent to the visual arts. Scholars of her life and works have tended to take her at her word, insisting that Tsvetaeva was primarily a poet of aural sensibilities who derived little inspiration from the visual world. The present essay challenges this notion by drawing together a number of primary source texts and recent scholarly studies to suggest instead that engagement with the visual world in general, and the visual arts in particular, provided substantive and instrumental stimuli in her creative process. In particular, the essay offers evidence of the way that sculpture, painting, and photography operate as key points of departure in her creative mission to transcend the limitations of physical space and chronological time in her poetry and other writings.

Series:

Olga Partan

Abstract

Cvetaeva’s dramatic writings have long been neglected in favor of her poetry and autobiographical and critical/theoretical prose. This article first lists her dramatic writings from the Revolutionary period (intended for the Vachtangov Theater) and from her time in emigration, outlining the plots, since not all the plays are available in translation. Then the generic traits of each play are considered, and critical reactions summarized.

Series:

Alexandra Smith

Abstract

Cvetaeva was never completely forgotten after her death in 1941, but her star began to rise in the 1960s, when (as this article shows) her work and biography began to be cited widely, and by all kinds of poets, as signs of freedom and artistic integrity. The article traces references to Cvetaeva in the works of numerous later Russian poets, beginning with the Thaw generation and moving into the post-Soviet present.