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Charlotte Hille

Clan societies differ substantially from Western democratic states. Clan societies are based around the extended family. Honour and solidarity are important, which is reflected in nepotism and blood revenge. However, a more positive aspect of clan societies is the use of reconciliation to solve conflicts. This guarantees that parties to a conflict can cooperate in the future. When intervening in a clan based society it is important to be aware of the differences compared to Western democracy. Based on theory and practice the cases of Afghanistan, Iraq, Albania and Chechnya are investigated. This book explains clan society and provides tools to facilitate state building and democratization in clan based societies for those who intervene, aimed at conflict resolution and democratization.

Series:

Edited by Alberto Gasparini

The Walls between Conflict and Peace discusses how walls are not merely static entities, but are in constant flux, subject to the movement of time. Walls often begin life as a line marking a radical division, but then become an area, that is to say a border, within which function civil and political societies, national and supranational societies. Such changes occur because over time cooperation between populations produces an active quest for peace, which is therefore a peace in constant movement. These are the concepts and lines of political development analysed in the book.
The first part of the book deals with political walls and how they evolve into borders, or even disappear. The second part discusses possible and actual walls between empires, and also walls which may take shape within present-day empires. The third part analyses various ways of being of walls between and within states: Berlin, the Vatican State and Italy, Cyprus, Israel and Palestine, Belfast, Northern European Countries, Gorizia and Nova Gorica, the USA and Mexico. In addition, discussion centres on a possible new Iron Curtain between the two Mediterranean shores and new and different walls within the EU. The last part of the book looks at how walls and borders change as a result of cooperation between the communities on either side of them.
The book takes on particular relevance in the present circumstances of the proliferation of walls between empires and states and within single states, but it also analyses processes of conflict and peace which come about as a result of walls.

Contributors are: Eliezer Ben-Rafael, Sigal Ben-Rafael Galanti, Melania-Gabriela Ciot, Hastings Donnan, Anneli Ute Gabanyi, Alberto Gasparini, Maria Hadjipavlou, Max Haller, Neil Jarman, Thomas Lunden, Domenico Mogavero, Alejandro Palma, Dennis Soden.

Series:

Rietjens

Modern peace support operations are challenged by an array of issues that are not at all 'military' in nature. Increasingly, military and civilian actors like non-governmental organisations, ministries and contractors have to learn how to work together. This book analyses civil-military cooperation processes in disciplines such as logistics, construction and security. The analysis is based on multiple holistic case studies in Kosovo (1999/2000), Kabul (2003/2004) and the Afghan province Baghlan (2004/2005). Taking a business alliance approach, the phases in a civil-military cooperation process are identified. Then the main factors influencing the process are highlighted. Finally, a framework is proposed for evaluating the quality of civil-military cooperation. The book concludes by recommending ways of improving the cooperation process.

Editor-in-Chief Tugba Basaran, Monique J. Beerli, Didier Bigo and Emma Mc Cluskey

FORTHCOMING IN 2020

In 2020, individuals will become eligible for a limited promotional period of free access to Political Anthropological Research on International Social Sciences (PARISS). Please be sure to revisit this page to take advantage of this offer.

Political Anthropological Research on International Social Sciences (PARISS) encourages transversal social inquiries. The journal seeks to transcend disciplinary, linguistic and cultural fragmentations characteristic of scholarship in the 20th century. It aspires to reinvigorate scholarly engagements untroubled by canonic approaches and to provide a space for outstanding scholarship, marginalized elsewhere due to academic conventions. PARISS seeks to promote a plurality of ways of thinking, researching and writing and to give access to contemporary authors in the social sciences coming from non-English-speaking countries. The editors encourage contributions that write across disciplines, academic cultures and writing styles. Innovative and collective research is particularly welcome.

PARISS is published in cooperation with the Centre d’étude sur les Conflits — Liberté et Sécurité (CCLS).

The editors welcome individually authored or co-authored articles (up to 3 authors; approximately 7,000-11,000 words including footnotes) and collectively authored articles (3+ authors; 10,000-25,000 words including footnotes), as well as book reviews, interviews, commentaries, and shorter articles focused on research methodologies (all up to 5,000 words).

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