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Abstract

This article introduces readers to the status of sighthounds in Spain, the abuse they endure at the hands of humans, and the work being carried out to help them by Galgos Del Sol, a local rescue with international partners. This paper is not based on empirical data or on scientific methods; it is, however, sourced directly from the experiences of an established Spanish sighthound rescue organisation, and affords the reader a unique and informed insight into this area.

In: Journal of Applied Animal Ethics Research

Abstract

Similar to other commodities, US sport horses have increasingly been outsourced. The sport horse commodity chain is a long process involving many actors. The data presented document a shift away from US-born horses to those born in Europe. Since the 1980s, the American sport horse market has become a global market. Over $300 million dollars in horses are imported into the United States, and over a third comes from Germany. These foreign horses have uprooted the domestic supply of sport horses, who were US-born ex-racehorses. This research relies on import data to document the transition from a domestic market to a global market. This transformation has wide-reaching implications for the equestrian industry in the US. Through analysis of import statistics, content analysis, and participant observation, data are presented that illustrate how equestrian show jumping changed as a result of the dependence on European supplies of horses.

In: Society & Animals

Abstract

Evidence suggests equine-assisted activities may provide psychological benefits to young people “at-risk.” Results are presented from an equine program among 14- to 16-year-old children (N = 7), mostly boys (N = 6), attending a non-traditional flexi-school in Australia. Thematic analyses were undertaken on observations by facilitators, researchers, and a school teacher, and interviews with a school teacher. Key themes suggest that program participants benefited from positive engagement, social connectedness, and increased confidence, relationships, and attachment. Mechanisms were identified as a desire and an ability to connect with the horse and a positive environment. The social context of the equine program contrasts with other contexts in these young people’s lives, which allowed them to engage through more positive relational, affectionate behavior. For the boys, positive rather than damaging masculine behavior was displayed. Furthermore, the compatible student-environment interactions provide a backdrop which makes other positive changes possible.

In: Society & Animals
In: Society & Animals

Abstract

People who live with pets (companion animals) in many cases see their pets as family members. Yet, in the eyes of the law, pets are still considered personal property. This is relevant to pet custody matters that may arise at the time of divorce or separation; pets fall within divorce financial proceedings. However, they have the unique nature of living and sentient property, which has interests. In this perspective, the best interest of the nonhuman animal should always be taken into account. Nonetheless, the law lacks definitive standards, and the ways in which courts construe contractual disputes involving nonhuman animals that relate to custody disputes in marital or other relationships do not always take into consideration the unique nature of this living and sentient property. This article provides an examination of the current Italian legal system and of Italian case law related to this matter.

In: Society & Animals
In: Society & Animals
In Nonprofit Finance: A Synthetic Review Thad D. Calabrese reviews the current state of research on nonprofit finance. The book comprehensively addresses core finance topics with a focus on those issues that differentiate nonprofit finance from traditional finance. Topics include the financial goals of nonprofits, sources and uses of funds, reserves and working capital, and debt and borrowing. The text also addresses recent innovations in nonprofit finance such as crowdsourcing donations, social impact bonds, flexible low yield paper, and donor-advised funds, as well as innovations in corporate forms. Throughout the text, gaps in our current knowledge are highlighted and avenues for future research are suggested. As such, Nonprofit Finance: A Synthetic Review is relevant for researchers and practitioners alike.

Abstract

A growing number of texts that address the history of the animal protection movement in the United States point to the importance of a document written in 1866 by ASPCA founder Henry Bergh and signed by dozens of influential supporters entitled the “Declaration of the Rights of Animals.” This article pursues the discussions and the bibliographical matter found in these texts along with other likely sources in which the “Declaration” or discussion of it might appear, and comes to the conclusion that no such document exists. In lieu of the “Declaration,” the article locates its origins in a very different document, traces the trajectory that led to that document being viewed in the terms currently ascribed to it, and emphasizes the impact that the presence or absence of such a groundbreaking document as the “Declaration” has on our understanding of the history and evolution of the animal protection movement.

In: Society & Animals

Abstract

The field of finance is concerned with the management of money and how and where such funds are acquired and used. This article reviews the broad literature on finance related to nonprofit and voluntary organizations, identifies gaps in knowledge, and proposes potential avenues for future researchers. It examines in detail the sources of funds for nonprofit organizations, especially nonprofit agencies—including issues around revenue portfolios and interactions, the uses of these funds—with an emphasis on incentives faced by nonprofit organizations around financial disclosures, the benefits and problems of slack resources and profits, and issues of capital structure in nonprofit organizations.

In: Nonprofit Finance: A Synthetic Review

Abstract

Since 2008, rabies has killed several thousand semi-feral dogs in Bali, but hundreds of thousands of dogs have been killed by government officials to control the disease, which continues to spread. This article tracks this rabies outbreak and the efforts to contain the disease, noting frictions that emerged between officials and animal welfare activists. The former depict the dogs as a nuisance that should be exterminated, while the latter showcase the dogs’ cultural and scientific importance. This biopolitical contest hinges on formulations of animality that position dogs in opposition to humans. Rabies complicates this conflict, as it not only violates human/nonhuman animal boundaries, rendering both human and nonhuman communities vulnerable to infection, but also transforms those who are infected into radically animal (violent, unreasonable, frothing) individuals. By rethinking animality via rabies, we may better recognize and counter articulations of animality that render vulnerable populations killable.

In: Society & Animals