Encounters across Arts, Sciences and Humanities
Experimental Practices seeks to develop the status of science, art, and literature as truly experimental practices and forms of knowledge production – each borrowing from the other in order to further its drive to invention and innovation.
In times of environmental, political, and technological transformation and crisis, the urge to forge new alliances between the humanities, arts, and sciences has given rise to disciplinary hybrids, such as the environmental humanities, the medical humanities, artistic research, or the neurohumanities – all of which signal a turn towards ecological, more-than-human and posthumanist approaches in resonance with a broad array of worldly concerns. In this context, Experimental Practices is a platform for experimental forms of research at the intersections of the humanities, sciences, as well as activists outside academia around issues that shape contemporary and future cultures.
Taking “experimentation” as the practice, topic, and aim of the series, the editors welcome monographs or collected volumes around a specific concept or theme that contribute and enact a practice-based as well as theory-driven poetics of knowledge.
The series is committed to continue a fruitful collaboration with the international SLSA (Society for the Study of Literature, Science, and the Arts), including its independent European branch SLSAeu.
Art and Science in the Early Modern Netherlands / Kunst en wetenschap in de vroegmoderne Nederlanden
Editors: Eric Jorink and Bart Ramakers
Art and science are commonly considered to be two distinct expressions of human culture. This volume of the Netherlands Kunsthistorisch Jaarboek is devoted to the extremely rich and complex relationship between these two in the early modern Netherlands, a relationship which went much further than the use of linear perspective in painting. Both in theory and in everyday practice, the distinction between 'art' and 'science' was hard to sustain, and often proved to be not that relevant at all. Artists perfected the portrayal of human anatomy, natural historians reflected on the visual representation of previously unknown forms of life, and wealthy citizens possessed cabinets of curiosities in which naturalia and articificalia shared prominence. The case studies in this rich and challenging volume explore such topics as the influence of pictography, theories of vision and colour, the influence of Cartesian natural philosophy on art theory, and the allegorisation of science in Dutch frontispieces, amongst others.