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Mit dem auf vier Bände angelegten Werk wird erstmalig eine Ikonologie der christlichen Kunst im historischen Ablauf geschildert. Die komplexe Geschichte des Bildes in der Kirche wird ausgehend von der Intention der Darstellungen auf den verschiedenen Bildträgern aufgezeigt und die Weise der damit verbundenen Argumentation fundiert dargelegt. Eingebettet in allgemeine historische Entwicklungen wird der Wandel der Themenkreise beschrieben. In der Einleitung werden die Prinzipien der Arbeit erläutert. Teil 1 (Alte Kirche) behandelt die Entstehung einer christlichen Bildkunst am Grabe (auf Sarkophagen und in Katakomben) und den späteren Übergang in die Kirchdekoration. Nach gleichen Prinzipien werden in Teil 2 die Bildkunst des Mittelalters, in Teil 3 die der Neuzeit und in Teil 4 die andersartige Entwicklung in der Ostkirche geschildert.
Author: Paul Shore

Abstract

The forty-one years between the Society of Jesus’s papal suppression in 1773 and its eventual restoration in 1814 remain controversial, with new research and interpretations continually appearing. Shore’s narrative approaches these years, and the period preceding the suppression, from a new perspective that covers individuals not usually discussed in works dealing with this topic. As well as examining the contributions of former Jesuits to fields as diverse as ethnology—a term and concept pioneered by an ex-Jesuit—and library science, where Jesuits and ex-Jesuits laid the groundwork for the great advances of the nineteenth century, the essay also explores the period the exiled Society spent in the Russian Empire. It concludes with a discussion of the Society’s restoration in the broader context of world history.

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Jesuit Studies
Mit dem auf vier Bände angelegten Werk wird erstmalig eine Ikonologie der christlichen Kunst im historischen Ablauf geschildert.
Die komplexe Geschichte des Bildes in der Kirche wird ausgehend von der Intention der Darstellungen auf den verschiedenen Bildträgern aufgezeigt und die Weise der damit verbundenen Argumentation fundiert dargelegt. Eingebettet in allgemeine historische Entwicklungen wird der Wandel der Themenkreise beschrieben.
Im zweiten Teil stehen mit Blick auf die Neubegründung staatlicher Macht im Westen sowie die Scholastik zunächst Werke der Buchmalerei, der Kirchendekoration und der Ausstattung im Zentrum. Ein häufiges Phänomen ist hier die Argumentationsweise der Typologie. Mit der Gotik setzt sich ein neuer Naturalismus durch, der gesehene Wirklichkeit im Bild wiedergeben will und auch alte Themen verändert. Der Bildschmuck der Kathedralportale wird ebenso wie die zunehmende Komplexität der Altarretabel beleuchtet. Teils auf östlichen Einflüssen basierend, gewinnt im Spätmittelalter die Tafelmalerei, ebenso wie die neuen Medien der Druckgraphik (Holzschnitt und Kupferstich), in der Privatandacht wie im Wallfahrtswesen an Bedeutung.
‘Ecumenism’ and ‘independency’ suggest two distinct impulses in the history of Christianity: the desire for unity, co-operation, connectivity, and shared belief and practice, and the impulse for distinction, plurality, and contextual translation. Yet ecumenism and independency are better understood as existing in critical tension with one another. They provide a way of examining changes in World Christianity. Taking their lead from the internationally acclaimed research of Brian Stanley, in whose honour this book is published, contributors examine the entangled nature of ecumenism and independency in the modern global history of Christianity. They show how the scrutiny afforded by the attention to local, contextual approaches to Christianity outside the western world, may inform and enrich the attention to transnational connectivity.

Abstract

From Eusebio Kino to Daniel Berrigan, and from colonial New England to contemporary Seattle, Jesuits have built and disrupted institutions in ways that have fundamentally shaped the Catholic Church and American society. As Catherine O’Donnell demonstrates, Jesuits in French, Spanish, and British colonies were both evangelists and agents of empire. John Carroll envisioned an American church integrated with Protestant neighbors during the early years of the republic; nineteenth-century Jesuits, many of them immigrants, rejected Carroll’s ethos and created a distinct Catholic infrastructure of schools, colleges, and allegiances. The twentieth century involved Jesuits first in American war efforts and papal critiques of modernity, and then (in accord with the leadership of John Courtney Murray and Pedro Arrupe) in a rethinking of their relationship to modernity, to other faiths, and to earthly injustice. O’Donnell’s narrative concludes with a brief discussion of Jesuits’ declining numbers, as well as their response to their slaveholding past and involvement in clerical sexual abuse.

In: Brill Research Perspectives in Jesuit Studies
For years the fact that the debate on science and religion was not related to cultural diversity was considered only a minor issue. However, lately, there is a growing concern that the dominance of ‘Western’ perspectives in this field do not allow for new understandings. This book testifies to the growing interest in the different cultural embeddings of the science and religion interface and proposes a framework that makes an intercultural debate possible. This proposal is based on a thorough study of the ‘lived theology’ of Christian students and university professors in Abidjan, Kinshasa and Yaoundé. The outcomes of the field research are related to a worldwide perspective of doing theology and a broader scope of scholarly discussions.
Tracing Their Paths, Reassessing Their Goals
This book collects fifteen essays and book sections about the Jesuits in India written over a period of more than thirty years. Many of these pieces, unavailable for years, now appear together for the first time. The essays open a window on the 450-year Jesuit history in India, from Roberto de Nobili in the seventeenth century to the leading Jesuit scholars of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The volume looks back into this long missionary history, but Clooney’s eye is also on the question of relevance today: How ought interreligious learning take place in the twenty-first century?

“Western Jesuit Scholars in India is a fascinating collection of studies of 17th-21st century Jesuit writings in and about classical India. By his methods and questions, Francis Clooney, Indologist and Jesuit theologian, exposes certain aporias and deficiencies latent in Indology. It concludes with a notable proposal of an interfaith sensibility.”
Gérard Colas, Directeur de recherche émérité, Centre National de la Recherche scientifique, Paris

“Francis X. Clooney’s Western Jesuit Scholars in India is that of a humanist. He is not only a studious and assiduous reader of texts in languages and intellectual idioms that few scholars are capable of untangling, but is also committed to finding deep human and spiritual connections, detecting the intellectual empathies and affinities that the Jesuit missionaries had labored to bring out in their writings over half a millennium. With a clear and engaging pen, impressive erudition, and intellectual humility before the truly difficult task, Clooney studies what is undoubtedly one of the most fascinating chapters in Jesuit intellectual history, the encounter with Indian philosophical and textual traditions. Seekers of knowledge and cultural understanding of all stripes will find in this book plenty of wisdom, some surprises, and a large historical canvas stretching from Italy to India and back, and beyond.”
Ines G. Županov, Senior Fellow, Centre d’études de l’Inde et de l’Asie du Sud, CNRS, Paris